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Article
Publication date: 15 September 2022

Saima Habib, Farzana Kishwar and Zulfiqar Ali Raza

The purpose of this study is to apply silver nanoparticles on the cellulosic fabric via a green cross-linking approach to obtain antibacterial textiles. The cellulosic

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to apply silver nanoparticles on the cellulosic fabric via a green cross-linking approach to obtain antibacterial textiles. The cellulosic fabrics may provide an ideal enclave for microbial growth due to their biodegradable nature and retention of certain nutrients and moisture usually required for microbial colonization. The application of antibacterial finish on the textile surfaces is usually done via synthetic cross-linkers, which, however, may cause toxic effects and halt the biodegradation process.

Design/methodology/approach

Herein, we incorporated citrate moieties on the cellulosic fabric as eco-friendly crosslinkers for the durable and effective application of nanosilver finish. The nanosilver finish was then applied on the citrate-treated cellulosic fabric under the pad-dry-cure method and characterized the specimens for physicochemical, textile and antibacterial properties.

Findings

The results expressed that the as-prepared silver particles possessed spherical morphology with their average size in the nano range and zeta potential being −40 ± 5 mV. The results of advanced analytical characterization demonstrated the successful application of nanosilver on the cellulosic surface with appropriate dispersibility.

Practical implications

The nanosilver-treated fabric exhibited appropriate textile and comfort and durable broad-spectrum antibacterial activity.

Originality/value

The treated cellulosic fabric expressed that the cross-linking, crystalline behavior, surface chemistry, roughness and amphiphilicity could affect some of its comfort and textile properties yet be in the acceptable range for potential applications in medical textiles and environmental sectors.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 January 2019

Sibel Kaplan and Ceren Karaman

The purpose of this paper is to investigate thermal comfort performances of socks produced from cotton and regenerated cellulosic fiber yarns by thermal resistance (by a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate thermal comfort performances of socks produced from cotton and regenerated cellulosic fiber yarns by thermal resistance (by a newly designed foot thermal manikin), moisture management tester (MMT) parameters and permeability (air and water vapor) tests.

Design/methodology/approach

Single jersey fabrics and socks were knitted from 30 Ne yarns produced from cotton, different regenerated cellulosic fibers (viscose, modal, bamboo, micromodal, Tencel®, Tencel LF®) and their blends. Thermal resistances of the socks were compared by a newly developed thermal foot manikin in a more realistic way than measurements in fabric form. Besides air and water vapor permeability, moisture management parameters of the fabrics were tested to differentiate performances of cellulosic fibers.

Findings

Results show that air permeability, liquid absorption and transfer parameters measured by MMT are generally identical and better for regenerated cellulosic fabrics than cotton. Micromodal and Tencel® have better performances for liquid transfer and overall moisture management capacities are superior for bamboo and Tencel LF®. Thermal resistances of the socks are minimum for Tencel LF® having a cross-linked structure and maximum for viscose socks.

Originality/value

It is thought that thermal resistance measured in socks form is more realistic than fabric measurements and results of this study that can be valid for all knitted garments. Moreover, comprehensive material plan of the study is valuable for getting reliable results for regenerated cellulosic fibers that have small differences in cases of thermal resistance and liquid transfer.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 April 2015

Santanu Basak, Kartick K Samanta, Sajal K Chattopadhyay, Rajesh Shashikant Narkar and R Mahangade

The purpose of this paper is to use the natural wastage plant product, bannana pseudostem sap (BPS) for using as fire retardant of cellulosic textile substrate. The study…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use the natural wastage plant product, bannana pseudostem sap (BPS) for using as fire retardant of cellulosic textile substrate. The study aims to use first time any wastage plant product for making fire retardant cellulosic textile. In this regard flame retardant functionality was imparted in cellulosic textile using BPS, an eco-friendly natural wastage product.

Design/methodology/approach

The extracted sap was made alkaline and applied in pre-mordanted bleached and mercerized cotton fabrics. Flame retardant properties of the control and treated fabrics were analyzed in terms of limiting oxygen index (LOI), horizontal and vertical flammability and total heat of combustion using bomb calorimeter. The thermal degradation and pyrolysis was studied using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The chemical composition of the control and BPS treated cellulosic fabric were analyzed by FTIR, SEM and EDX. Durability of the flame retardant functionality to soap washing had also been studied.

Findings

The study showed that the treated fabrics had good flame retardant property compared to control fabrics. The LOI value was found to increase by 1.6 times after application of BPS. As a result of this, the fabric does not catch flame. In horizontal flammability, the treated fabric showed burning with afterglow (without presence of flame) with a propagation rate of 7.5 mm/min, which is almost ten times lower than the control fabric. After application of BPS cellulosic fabric sample produced natural khaki colour. There was no significant change in other physical properties.

Practical implications

The application process is simple and cost-effective as no costly chemicals were used. Further advantage is that the treated fabric could also be considered as natural dyed cotton fabric. The developed khaki colour is quite attractive and stable to sun light exposure. This developed process could used in colouration and flame retardant finishing of home furnishing products such as home-window curtain, railway curtain, hospital curtain, table lamp and as a covering material of non-permanent structure like in book fair, festival, religious purpose, etc., where large quantity of textile is used and has chance of fire hazards.

Social implications

BPS abundantly available in Indian as well as other countries and it is normally considered as waste material. It is eco-friendly and produced from renewable source. Therefore, the application of BPS in cotton textile for colouration and functionalization will give the advantages of value addition using natural product. Rural people will be benifited lot by applying this technology whenever it required.

Originality/value

This paper helps to clarify first time why and how a wastage plant product like BPS can be used for preparing fire retardant cotton cellulosic fabric.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2021

Zulfiqar Ali Raza, Faiza Anwar and Sharjeel Abid

Chitosan is widely considered as a natural polymer and a diverse finish to impart antibacterial property and enhanced dye uptake of textiles. Herein, the authors have…

Abstract

Purpose

Chitosan is widely considered as a natural polymer and a diverse finish to impart antibacterial property and enhanced dye uptake of textiles. Herein, the authors have investigated the feasibility of using chitosan/starch blend as a thickener in screen printing of cellulosic fabrics with some natural dyes.

Design/methodology/approach

The polymeric blend of chitosan/starch was prepared and used as a thickener for screen printing with three natural dye extracts, namely, Curcuma tinctoria (turmeric), Beta vulgaris (beet) roots and Lawsonia alba (henna) leaves on cellulosic fabrics like cotton and viscose. The viscosity and rheological properties of print paste as a fresh and after overnight shelving were examined. The influence of polymeric blends on cellulosic fabrics' print properties was inspected by determining their colorfastness, rubbing fastness, tensile strength and antibacterial activity.

Findings

The results depicted that chitosan/starch blend as printing thickener increased the shade depth with good wet and dry rubbing fastness for all the test natural dyes. The antibacterial activity of resultant printed cellulosic fabrics was found to be satisfactory against broad-spectrum bacterial strains.

Practical implications

This study's outcome is the development of chitosan blend thickeners to print the cellulosic fabrics with indigenous natural dyes.

Originality/value

The authors found no previous report on the synthesis of chitosan-based antibacterial blend thickeners with three distinct natural dyes and their application in screen printing of native and regenerated cellulosic fabrics of cotton and viscose, respectively.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2014

K. Haggag, H. S. El-Sayad, Sh. Abd El-Moez and I. Abd El-Thalouth

Cellulosic wastes from El-Nasr Co. for Intermediate Chemicals are used as a starting material for the preparation of methylcellulose with tailored properties. The wastes…

Abstract

Cellulosic wastes from El-Nasr Co. for Intermediate Chemicals are used as a starting material for the preparation of methylcellulose with tailored properties. The wastes are first purified, followed by alkali ageing for different intervals of time. This is done to control the molecular weight of the cellulose molecules, thereby obtaining cellulosics with different degrees of polymerization (DP). These samples along with the original purified cellulose are methylated under similar conditions and the obtained methylcellulose samples are examined for solubility, degree of substitution (DS) and rheological properties. The results obtained from these investigations are summarized as follows. It is found that the DP of the starting cellulose progressively decreases by prolonging the duration of alkali ageing, while the carboxyl content increases. The DS of the methyl groups increases as the DP of the starting substrate decreases. The rheological properties as well as the apparent viscosity at various rates of shear for the prepared derivatives are thoroughly investigated.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2015

M.C.F. Ng and W. Wang

Over the past few decades, there have been an increasing number of attempts to produce materials for fashion creation aiming at cost effectiveness, low environmental…

Abstract

Over the past few decades, there have been an increasing number of attempts to produce materials for fashion creation aiming at cost effectiveness, low environmental impact, labour friendliness and biodegradability. Among them, biotechnology is believed to be one of the finest substitutes for future fashion creation. A study has been carried out to explore the future development of fashion design and the possible applications of materials which can be grown from natural renewable and degradable resources. A pilot test with five design professionals on the comfort of bacterial cellulosic pellicles produced in varied incubation times and broth concentrations was conducted. This paper reports a further investigation of the receptivity to these bacterial cellulosic pellicles as material for future fashion through comparing and evaluating three comfort factors, namely hand comfort, flexibility comfort and breathability comfort, and two appearance factors, namely colour and texture, with 150 subjects using the random sampling method. The optimal favourable pellicle for fashion creation was identified and presented.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2010

Pablo Catalan and Elena Berger

Alternative fuels for transportation are gaining momentum in the global market. Ethanol has been the most used biofuel as an additive and as a substitute for gasoline in a…

Abstract

Alternative fuels for transportation are gaining momentum in the global market. Ethanol has been the most used biofuel as an additive and as a substitute for gasoline in a number of countries. Current technology to produce ethanol based on sugar and starch crops creates price imbalances in the food market and cannot supply a sustainable industry of ethanol in the long term. Second generation technologies based on cellulosebased feedstocks use non‐edible crops and have a positive energy balance. Notwithstanding, they are not yet economic at the industrial level, requiring investment in Research and Development (R&D) to help overcome technological barriers. Many countries recognise the value of collaboration to increase benefits and reduce costs of research, and some of them have in place policy instruments to promote this practice. Given the policy relevance, multidisciplinary characteristics of biofuels, and increasing incentives towards international cooperation, the monitoring of the evolution and patterns of international collaboration in R&D is in place. We map the evolution of the global scientific activity of research on cellulosic ethanol. We carry out a bibliometric analysis by building a publication dataset drawn from the ISI Thompson Science Citation Index database covering the period between 1970 and 2006. We identify the most productive institutions and countries, their historical evolution and interaction patterns.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Md. Ibrahim H. Mondal and Firoz Ahmed

This study aims to explore the use of knitted rag by synthesizing different grades of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) by applying multiple-step carboxymethylation techniques.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the use of knitted rag by synthesizing different grades of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) by applying multiple-step carboxymethylation techniques.

Design/methodology/approach

CMC was synthesized from knitted rag, a cellulosic waste of textile and garment industries, in aqueous ethanolic sodium hydroxide and subsequently mono-chloroacetic acid reaction medium. Low-substituted to high-substituted products were obtained from single-step to seven-step carboxymethylation of cellulose. In this way, it was possible to produce low-cost and different grades of substituted carboxymethylated cellulose. The synthesized CMC was characterized, and their physical properties were investigated. The structure of CMC and grafted CMC were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

Findings

Solubility, CMC content, degree of substitution and molecular weight of CMC were increased gradually with the increase in the number of reaction steps, although fourth step attained the optimum. The cellulosic waste of knitted rag can easily be used to produce value-added products such as CMC and other cellulose derivatives, and that will ultimately reduce the pollution problems from this waste.

Originality/value

Grafting of prepared CMC film with methyl methacrylate monomer increased their strength, although decreased rigidity and moisture content because the incorporation of hydrophobic methyl methacrylate monomer was observed.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1983

Americus

Rheological Control Additives. Many additives to coatings affect the rheology of the composition so that application and storage properties are improved. A new rheological…

Abstract

Rheological Control Additives. Many additives to coatings affect the rheology of the composition so that application and storage properties are improved. A new rheological additive for emulsion polymers and water‐reducible resins has been described by Whitton and Masterson [Modern Paint & Coatings, November (1980) p. 33]. The authors point out that latex paints practically always require rheological additives if they are to have good application and stability properties. Without additives they are prone to dripping, sagging, and spattering as well as pigment settling, phase separation, and pigment flocculation. The most widely used rheological additives for waterborne coatings are cellulosic derivatives, and the authors estimate that 85 to 90% of latex trade sales coatings are thickened with additives such as hydroxyethylcellulose, methyl hydroxypropylcellulose, and methylcellulose. The disadvantages of these materials is that they are difficult to disperse which means that energy and time are consumed in grinding. Also, in automated pigment slurry systems the cellulosics require a large amount of water for dispersion. This limits flexibility in formulation. Also, the cellulosics can be attacked by enzymes although more expensive enzyme‐resistant forms are available.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 12 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1974

G.E. BOND and J.S. CORNELL

Since the development of electrostatic powder spraying, powders based on epoxy resins have been the ones predominantly used. These powders have worked well in many cases…

Abstract

Since the development of electrostatic powder spraying, powders based on epoxy resins have been the ones predominantly used. These powders have worked well in many cases and can be used for decorative as well as functional coatings. These coatings due, to the chemical nature of epoxy resins, are ‘thermosetting’. This means they not only undergo a physical change when heated, that causes them to melt and flow but they also undergo a chemical change that causes them to increase in molecular weight or ‘crosslink’. Once this happens they cannot be remelted if heated a second time. Due to the wide use of epoxy powders many people associate powder coating with thermosetting powder.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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