Search results

1 – 10 of over 16000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 November 2021

Ishwar Singh Darji and Suman Dahiya

This study aims to evaluate the financial performance of the textile industry in Haryana located in the northern part of India.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate the financial performance of the textile industry in Haryana located in the northern part of India.

Design/methodology/approach

Input-oriented Cooper, Charnes and Rhodes (CCR) and Banker, Charnes and Cooper (BCC) techniques of data envelopment analysis, as well as the return to scale (RTS) technique, were used to conduct the analysis.

Findings

The findings show that textile units in Haryana have hugely underperformed financially with a consolidated technical efficiency score of only 0.35. Both private and public limited textile companies with respective scores of 0.46 and 0.24 are technically efficient. Public limited textile companies are more efficient than private limited companies. Private limited textile companies need to increase their input scale because they are operating at an increasing return to scale while public limited textile companies have to lower their input scale because most companies are operating at a decreasing return to scale to enhance their efficiency.

Originality/value

The study can assist in decision-making to all key stakeholders (Shareholders, management, government, tax authorities, debtors and creditors, among others) by identifying efficient and inefficient companies. Appropriate policies can be framed based on that knowledge.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2007

Janusz Zięba

This paper introduces two types of textile magnetic elements: mechanical-magnetic and circuital. Textile magnetic cores consist of elementary monofilament magnetic fibres…

Abstract

This paper introduces two types of textile magnetic elements: mechanical-magnetic and circuital. Textile magnetic cores consist of elementary monofilament magnetic fibres. Textile magnetic coils which are composed of a textile carcass, winding (electro-conductive yarn or wire) and magnetic fibres are presented. Textile magnetic elements are mainly textile cores which are the basic elements of textile electromagnetic devices such as sensors, actuators and transformers. Textile sensors are used to measure human physiological parameters such as breathing rhythm and pulse.

One of the most interesting applications of magnetic non-wovens is magnetic shielding. I present macroscopic magneto-mechanical and magnetic models circuital which will possibly be the basis for future mathematical description and simulation procedures of magnetic fibres and textile magnetic cores. The analysis results of transversal and longitudinal magnetic fibres are also presented. The mathematical problem of designing textile magnetic cores with the interlacement of the magnetic fibres is described. A block diagram for simulation models created by the Matlab-Simulink program is presented.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Nicholas Bilalis, Luk N. Van Wassenhove, Emmanuel Maravelakis, Andreas Enders, Vassilis Moustakis and Aristomenis Antoniadis

The European Union (EU) clothing and textile industries are characterized by very intense international competition. EU producers face fierce competition from exports of

Downloads
2455

Abstract

Purpose

The European Union (EU) clothing and textile industries are characterized by very intense international competition. EU producers face fierce competition from exports of new industrialized countries whose low wages and social charges give them a considerable competitive advantage. This paper seeks to present the results of an analysis of the European textile sector competitiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based on an industrial excellence (IE) model developed by INSEAD. This model has been used for the last ten years in an annual award (IEA), given out in France and Germany. This time the model was used not for giving an award, but for assessing and analyzing the current status of industrial excellence in the textile sector. For this reason a sample of textile companies from three European countries was used and results of the analysis are presented. The textile companies that participated in the analysis were benchmarked against the technologically advanced IEA sample consisting of companies from various industries, which participated in the competition during the last three years.

Findings

Key performance indicators of the textile sector are analyzed, including quality, flexibility, supply chain management, strategy formulation and strategy implementation. Significant improvement potential, especially in the areas of human resource management and knowledge management, is indicated.

Research limitations/implications

Provides a methodology for employing the IE approach in their operation. Also provides a methodology for analyzing sector performance and new areas of differentiation in the European textile sector.

Practical implications

The results of the analysis were used to define customized IE training in order to promote expertise in IE in textiles and improve competitiveness of the sector.

Originality/value

The IEA model is used for the first time, not for giving an award, but as an IE assessment tool which can assist managers both of textile companies and intermediary bodies.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Lieva Van Langenhove and Carla Hertleer

After technical textiles and functional textiles, smart textiles came into force a few years back. The term “smart textiles” covers a broad range. The application…

Downloads
5885

Abstract

After technical textiles and functional textiles, smart textiles came into force a few years back. The term “smart textiles” covers a broad range. The application possibilities are only limited by our imagination and creativity. Hence it is not simple for the readers of the many articles that have been published to distinguish where reality ends and where fiction begins. In this paper, it is further explored what smart textiles precisely mean. In a second part, an analysis is made of the possibilities, the state of affairs and the need for further research, including research in the Department of Textiles at the Ghent University (Belgium).

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 16 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 October 2021

Nidhi Goyal, Deepali Rastogi, Manjeet Jassal and Ashwini K. Agrawal

Dyeing and printing are important steps in textile manufacturing. After the process completion, these dyes are released in the effluent. These dyes impart an unacceptable…

Abstract

Purpose

Dyeing and printing are important steps in textile manufacturing. After the process completion, these dyes are released in the effluent. These dyes impart an unacceptable appearance but are also toxic to the soil and water bodies. The present research has been carried out to study the rate of photocatalytic degradation of an azo dye, namely, CI Direct Green 26, using titania nanoparticles under ultra violet (UV) irradiation as a function of temperature and time. Azo dyes account for the majority of all dyestuffs are produced and extensively used in the textile, paper, food, leather, cosmetics and pharmaceutical industries. Titania nanoparticles have been found to successfully degrade these dyes in the presence of UV light. The purpose of the present paper was to study the photodegradation of azo dyes using titania nanoparticles at different temperatures and time periods.

Design/methodology/approach

Titania nanoparticle concentration of 0.1% (w/v) was dispersed in distilled water by sonication for 1 h in sonication bath. The of rate of degradation of Direct Green 26 dye in the titania nanoparticle dispersion, under UV-A exposure was studied at different temperatures ranging from 25°C to 65 °C for time periods ranging from 1 h to 6 h. Photocatalytic degradation tests were performed in a specially designed UV reactor chamber. Raman spectroscopy of Titania nanoparticles, dye and titania/dye mixture before and after UV exposure was carried out using Confocal Laser Dispersion Raman Microscope (Renishaw, UK) with 785 nm excitation laser.

Findings

Titanium dioxide is an efficient photocatalyst for decolourisation of direct dye. The photodegradation of the direct Green dye was found to follow the pseudo first-order reaction. The Arrhenius activation energy was found to be 24.8 kJ/mol with A value of 0.0013 for the photocatalytic degradation of the dye. Raman spectroscopy also confirmed the adsorption of dye on titania nanoparticle and its complete degradation on exposure to UV light.

Practical implications

This research highlights the application of titania nanoparticles for the effective degradation of dye in the effluent from textiles, clothing, paper and any kind of dyeing process. Azo dyes account for the majority of all dyestuffs are produced and extensively used in the textile, paper, food, leather, cosmetics and pharmaceutical industries. Titania nanoparticles have been found to successfully degrade these dyes in the presence of UV light which can be very beneficial for the effluent treatment plants in textile and other industries.

Originality/value

Azo dyes are one of the harmful pollutants released in textile waste water. The degradation and removal of the coloured waste in the textile effluent is an important environmental concern and needs to be investigated. The research is one of the first to investigate and understand the mechanism of the degradation of an azo dye in the presence of titania nanoparticles by Raman spectroscopy.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Case study
Publication date: 23 September 2021

Malay Krishna and Vasant Sivaraman

The case includes links to video clips on textile and apparel manufacture to familiarize students with the textile manufacturing process. The case also provides links to…

Abstract

Supplementary materials

The case includes links to video clips on textile and apparel manufacture to familiarize students with the textile manufacturing process. The case also provides links to audio and video clips of the case protagonist discussing the strengths and weaknesses of the cluster at IK.

Learning outcomes

The case offers opportunities for the learner to analyze the situation from three cases as follows: industry, cluster (broadly location) and firm. Specific teaching objectives are as follows: How to identify and analyze the drivers of competitiveness of a cluster. Assess the strength of clusters using Porter’s Diamond framework. Map the linkages between players of a cluster as follows: across firms, industries and public organizations. Benchmark and compare clusters to identify opportunities for upgrading competitiveness.

Case overview/synopsis

The case describes the challenge facing Mr Nikunj Bagdia, the owner and chief executive of Ken Enterprises Private Limited (Ken), a textile manufacturing unit located in the town of Ichalkaranji (IK), in October of 2019. IK boasts the largest number of cutting-edge air-jet looms in India and Ken is IK’s largest exporter of woven textile fabrics. However, IK lags the textile and apparel manufacturing cluster of Tiruppur, in another region of the country. The case enables a microeconomic analysis of the business environment of industrial clusters and a cluster mapping exercise, which helps identify opportunities for enhancing IK’s textile cluster. As the case closes, Nikunj is trying to prioritize opportunities that could emerge from the analyzes.

Complexity academic level

Masters/MBA level courses on competitiveness, strategy for economic development and microeconomics of competitiveness.

Subject Code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2021

Anna Zhuravleva and Anna Aminoff

The European Union (EU) member states are obligated to implement the separate collection of textile waste by the year 2025. Nowadays, non-profit organizations (NPOs) are…

Abstract

Purpose

The European Union (EU) member states are obligated to implement the separate collection of textile waste by the year 2025. Nowadays, non-profit organizations (NPOs) are the largest collectors of post-use textiles. In support of upcoming changes, this study develops an understanding of barriers and drivers for establishing partnerships between NPOs and companies in reverse textile supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts the embedded single-case design. The main data source is semi-structured interviews with NPOs, companies and research institutes in Finland, identified through intensity case sampling. The drivers and barriers are categorized into seven categories: environmental, economic, social, institutional, technological and informational, supply chain and organizational categories.

Findings

This study elaborates on the barriers and drivers in a new context of textile valorization and prioritizes them. The study identifies the alignment of interests and goals, increased transparency and clarity of terminology and other main factors in establishing the partnership.

Research limitations/implications

Expanding the geographical boundaries of current research will capture the experiences of NPOs and companies in other contextual settings.

Practical implications

This study contributes to the existing knowledge with a broad picture of different barriers and drivers. The findings intend to support the integration of NPOs in reverse textile supply chains.

Social implications

The partnership can potentially minimize the export of post-use textiles to developing countries, thus reducing the negative environmental footprint and social impact of the textile industry.

Originality/value

The study looks at an emerging form of partnership between NPOs and companies in reverse supply chains for enabling valorization of post-use textiles.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 51 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 13 September 2018

Jen Ballie and Mel Woods

Fashion/textile small- to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are currently adding value to previously discarded textile waste by applying practical skills, knowledge and…

Abstract

Fashion/textile small- to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are currently adding value to previously discarded textile waste by applying practical skills, knowledge and expertise to rework and reuse this material. As a result, sustainable design strategies such as zero-waste pattern-cutting, design for disassembly and upcycling are beginning to emerge. However, the scope for redesign will always be limited and the complete lifecycle of the material used needs to be considered at the front-end of the innovation process, to optimise material lifespans and reduce consumer waste. Further work is also required to inspire and educate the next generation of designers to the creative potential of reuse, and help the industry to understand its viability, scalability and role in the future. This chapter explores how the principals of the circular economy might support business model innovation within fashion and textiles. To this end, an exploratory canvas tool for SMEs, ‘Circular by Design’, was devised to aid SMEs to embrace closed-loop systems and to identify the most appropriate sustainable design strategies for their business.

Details

Unmaking Waste in Production and Consumption: Towards the Circular Economy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-620-4

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 May 2021

Abdulla and Shiv Kumar

This paper aims to examine technical efficiency and its determinants in Indian textile garments industry in post-agreement on textiles and clothing regime and evaluate the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine technical efficiency and its determinants in Indian textile garments industry in post-agreement on textiles and clothing regime and evaluate the technical efficiency among micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) firms.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses unbalanced panel data for the period 2005–2010 to 2015–2016. The stochastic frontier function is used to estimate technical efficiency and its determinants.

Findings

The results show that the overall ecosystem of textile garments’ value chains could be improved to enhance the technical efficiency thereof. The result also reveals that small-scale firms have the highest technical efficiency scores, and medium-scale firms have the least technical efficiency score among all the categories of MSMEs.

Research limitations/implications

The textile garments industry needs to define its innovation strategies, as these strategies lead to different results that can be achieved only through the management of resources dedicated to the generation and implementation of innovations.

Practical implications

This study has shown that to offset India’s cost disadvantage in the international markets, there is a need to develop an ecosystem of textile manufacturing and value chains, eliminate the inverted duty structure (where inputs are taxed at a higher rate than the final product) and switch over from shuttle looms toward shuttle-less looms. This would unleash the potential of textile and garments industry and make it globally competitive and technically efficient. Further, there will be an alignment with the ease of doing business with an appropriate mix of policy, technology, institution, infrastructure, information and services.

Originality/value

Using frontier production function takes stochastic context into account for the dynamic character of technical efficiency and its components. Most of the past studies have assessed technical efficiency at the aggregate level using three-digit National Industrial Classification (NIC) or four-digit NIC code. An analysis at higher levels of aggregation masks the variation in technical efficiency. This study used five-digit NIC data to measure the firm-specific technical efficiency of the textile industry. According to the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first of its kind in the Indian textile industry using stochastic frontier approach and panel data. Further, it also looks at the contribution of different determinants in technical efficiency to the firms.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Harleen Sahni and Nupur Chopra

Globalization and its impacts on economies, societies and cultures has been a hot topic of research and discussion in the past few years. Recent times are witnessing the…

Abstract

Globalization and its impacts on economies, societies and cultures has been a hot topic of research and discussion in the past few years. Recent times are witnessing the upsurge of another doctrine in the international arena – the practice of isolationism, a policy majorly related to political affairs but extendable to business, sustainability, green behaviour and various other spheres.

Globalization has resulted in various kinds of disordering and reordering of business objectives and practices. Modern day consumers have new needs and lifestyle orientations. The flip side is that increased global operations have precipitated newer challenges for Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). But for managing globalization, isolationism is not the answer (Altman, 2007). Isolationism cannot be expected to have reciprocative effects of globalization. In fact, it may be in dispute with interests of many social stakeholders.

Responsible businesses have reoriented their CSR initiatives towards environmental and social stewardship. Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are the more recent strategic tools that provide a more focussed mandate to address sustainability issues emerging from increased production, consumption and disposal. In the times of vulnerabilities and disruption, there is an increasing emphasis on developing CSR as a horizontal enabler of SDGs.

Fashion & textile industry is the second most polluting industry globally. Fast fashion is having catastrophic impacts on the environment. Due to the massive size and magnitude of the global fashion & textile industry (USD 920 billion in 2018 and projected to grow to USD 1,230 billion by 2024), it becomes important to examine dimensions of CSR, in reference to SDGs in this sector. The fashion & textile industry is one of the most globally integrated. Sourcing, production, supply chain management, market development and retailing are all dependent on integration and collaboration amongst various business entities and regulatory bodies across national boundaries. Isolationism may result in disorientations in the enabling environments of this industry.

As sustainability is going to be the most important directive in coming future, the study aims to examine the cohesiveness between the current CSR initiatives of the fashion & textile sector and the prescribed SDGs. The study will further investigate if the instantaneous momentum of isolationism could cultivate multifaceted challenges for the horizontal integration of CSR in SDGs; and if yes, what will be the nature of these challenges?

1 – 10 of over 16000