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Article

Krishnadas Nanath and Shivani Ajit Kumar

This paper aims to test the effectiveness of communication platforms in conveying the importance of sustainability messages focusing on electronic waste (e-waste…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to test the effectiveness of communication platforms in conveying the importance of sustainability messages focusing on electronic waste (e-waste) recycling. While corporate communication has been explored well, this research explores the influence of communication medium on the shift in attitude and behavioural intention of higher education students.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental design approach was used with quantitative data analysis to address the research questions.

Findings

The results revealed that the text form of communication was more effective in conveying the e-waste recycling message. Students demonstrated a significant shift in attitude and call for action when they read the sustainability article instead of watching a video with the same message.

Practical implications

With several universities trying to integrate sustainability in their curriculum, this research provides guidelines on effective communication methods for students. It also sheds light on the choice of platforms that can be used by organisations to reach out to their employees to convey sustainability-related messages.

Originality/value

The paper addresses sustainability communication in a university by exploring the best method of communication. The results open up new conversations on the media richness theory in the context of sustainability.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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Case study

Krishnadas Nanath

Bottom of the Pyramid (BOP); social innovation and business modeling.

Abstract

Subject area

Bottom of the Pyramid (BOP); social innovation and business modeling.

Study level/applicability

Undergraduate and graduate level management/business school students. It can be taught in marketing management and entrepreneurship/innovation courses.

Case overview

LifeSpring Hospitals Pvt. Ltd is an expanding chain of hospitals that provide high quality health care to lower-income women and children across Andhra Pradesh. It is a 50-50 equity partnership between Hindustan Latex Ltd and the Acumen Fund. LifeSpring has demonstrated exceptional management principles, some of them being the most innovative and attractive ones. The entire focus of LifeSpring is on one particular niche: maternal care. Some argue about its strategy of not adopting diversification, but LifeSpring has proved its point by actually turning out to be a profitable business. The strategy of focusing on one niche has led to reduction in cost in terms of specialized doctors and the range of equipment needed to serve. Adding to the strategic strength of LifeSpring, its operations (management) is perfectly aligned with the organization's vision and quality is achieved via highly standardized procedures for maternal care service.

Expected learning outcomes

This case will cover two important aspects of BOP and social innovation. MBA students will investigate an innovative business model and apply their analytical skills to analyse the sustainability of the model.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes and exercise for class-based discussion.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article

Krishnadas Nanath, Ali Sajjad and Supriya Kaitheri

University selection in higher education is a complex task for aspirants from a decision-making perspective. This study first aims to understand the essential parameters…

Abstract

Purpose

University selection in higher education is a complex task for aspirants from a decision-making perspective. This study first aims to understand the essential parameters that affect potential students' choice of higher education institutions. It then aims to explore how these parameters or priorities have changed given the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Learning about the differences in priorities for university selection pre- and post-COVID-19 pandemic might help higher education institutions focus on relevant parameters in the post-pandemic era.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a mixed-method approach, with primary and secondary data (university parameters from the website and LinkedIn Insights). We developed a university selector system by scraping LinkedIn education data of various universities and their alumni records. The final decision-making tool was hosted on the web to collect potential students' responses (primary data). Response data were analyzed via a multicriteria decision-making (MCDM) model. Portal-based data collection was conducted twice to understand the differences in university selection priorities pre- and post-COVID-19 pandemic. A one-way MANOVA was performed to find the differences in priorities related to the university decision-making process pre- and post-COVID-19.

Findings

This study considered eight parameters of the university selection process. MANOVA demonstrated a significant change in decision-making priorities of potential students between the pre- and post-COVID-19 phases. Four out of eight parameters showed significant differences in ranking and priority. Respondents made significant changes in their selection criteria on four parameters: cost (went high), ranking (went low), presence of e-learning mode (went high) and student life (went low).

Originality/value

The current COVID-19 pandemic poses many uncertainties for educational institutions in terms of mode of delivery, student experience, campus life and others. The study sheds light on the differences in priorities resulting from the pandemic. It attempts to show how social priorities change over time and influence the choices students make.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

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Abstract

Title

GOONJ: the power of cloth.

Subject area

Strategic management and social innovation

Study level/applicability

Undergraduate and graduate level management/business school students. It can be taught in strategic management and social innovation courses.

Case overview

GOONJ is a non‐profit organization which has life and dignity for lakhs of people in India over the last decade. It aimed at bringing up clothing as one of the important aspects of human life and make it available for the needy keeping their dignity intact. The case begins with Anshu Gupta, founder of GOONJ thinking deeply about the high‐priority meeting to take GOONJ to the next level and scale up the operations of his social innovation. It then tries to bring up the potential problem of clothing and menstrual hygiene in India followed by explanation of the present working model of GOONJ which allows them to manage the operations with 97 paisa per cloth. With the dream of taking GOONJ to the next level and converting it into a nation‐wide phenomenon, will the present model work?

Expected learning outcomes

This case will cover two important aspects: social innovation process (themes, challenges and implications for practice); and strategic management concepts (stakeholder theory, internal‐external factor evaluation).

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Book part

Alun Epps

By the end of this chapter on minors, internet-enabled devices and online shopping behaviour, readers will be able to

  • Identify fundamental benefits and harm engendered when…

Abstract

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this chapter on minors, internet-enabled devices and online shopping behaviour, readers will be able to

  • Identify fundamental benefits and harm engendered when minors have unlimited access to internet-enabled devices

  • Locate the main catalysts of benefit and harm to minors due to internet usage

  • Show how a priori studies have created a rich and balanced narrative in the field of benefits and harm of the internet to minors

  • Argue how the benefits outweigh the harm (or vice versa) impacting on minors in unlimited use of the internet

  • Develop strategies to enhance the benefits and limit the harm caused by unlimited access to the internet

Identify fundamental benefits and harm engendered when minors have unlimited access to internet-enabled devices

Locate the main catalysts of benefit and harm to minors due to internet usage

Show how a priori studies have created a rich and balanced narrative in the field of benefits and harm of the internet to minors

Argue how the benefits outweigh the harm (or vice versa) impacting on minors in unlimited use of the internet

Develop strategies to enhance the benefits and limit the harm caused by unlimited access to the internet

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