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Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 29 November 2023

Savita Ayyar

Research and innovation are a major national priority in India and are conducted across a diverse group of institutions. While Research Management (RM) activities were previously…

Abstract

Research and innovation are a major national priority in India and are conducted across a diverse group of institutions. While Research Management (RM) activities were previously integrated into researcher and other roles in India, there is now recognition that RM services rendered by professionally trained staff can reduce the administrative burden on researchers, thereby enhancing the ease of doing research. This chapter provides context on the complex higher education and research ecosystem in India, outlines the circumstances leading to the development of RM support at Indian institutions, and highlights the contributions of the India Research Management Initiative in creating a community of practice for RM. The chapter concludes with some projections for the future of RM in India.

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Research Management and Administration Around the World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-701-8

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 9 June 2015

Rakesh Mohan Joshi

India and Iran historically share centuries-old strong socio-cultural and trade relations since ancient times. The chapter explores emerging opportunities and challenges in trade…

Abstract

India and Iran historically share centuries-old strong socio-cultural and trade relations since ancient times. The chapter explores emerging opportunities and challenges in trade and investment in the present era. While Iran is one of the leading producers and exporters of oil, India, a major market for hydrocarbons, is heavily dependent on imports to meet its domestic requirements. This offers trade complementarities between the two countries as India is a secure market for Iran’s oil whereas Iran facilitates India to decrease its over-dependence for oil on Saudi Arabia. This chapter discusses the mutually beneficial trade relationship as well as potential for further deepening the existing economic ties between these two ancient civilizations that could offer a win-win situation for both countries.

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Reintegrating Iran with the West: Challenges and Opportunities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-742-0

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2019

Suvayan Neogi and Chandni Dawani

Any country including India which has registered remarkable growth has done so by participating in the economic integration process led by global and regional trade…

Abstract

Any country including India which has registered remarkable growth has done so by participating in the economic integration process led by global and regional trade liberalization. India has an emerging web of cooperation with East Asian countries, especially Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) through the ASEAN–India dialogue process, the bilateral free trade agreement with Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand and subregional initiatives such as the Mekong–Ganga Cooperation and the Bay of Bengal Initiative for Multi-Sectoral Technical and Economic Cooperation (BIMSTEC; Yong 2005).

India's free trade agreements and regional trade agreements with countries in this region have not been models of success in their implementation even when there were benefits. The main idea of the formal trade negotiation was to enhance ASEAN-India partnership, specifically in the economic arena. However, India's position in ASEAN's external trade and investment flows has not yet experienced any special momentum. The two-way trade between India and ASEAN is tilted toward ASEAN with the trade gap expanding rapidly.

Thus, to understand India's trade with ASEAN, the chapter would examine India's trade prospects with the ASEAN-5 (Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Philippines, and Vietnam) particularly in merchandise trade. This chapter would identify new products that India can export to the ASEAN, which will increase its share in ASEAN's market. In order to achieve this, the chapter seeks to discuss the detailed microanalysis at HS 6-digit level to capture the trade creation effects based on lower unit value items for estimating product-specific potential exports and imports to/from ASEAN.

Details

The Gains and Pains of Financial Integration and Trade Liberalization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-004-7

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 March 2024

Farha Khan and Akansha Mer

Introduction: The ethical implications of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) profiling or DNA fingerprinting or forensic genetics in criminal investigations have gained significant…

Abstract

Introduction: The ethical implications of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) profiling or DNA fingerprinting or forensic genetics in criminal investigations have gained significant attention worldwide. In India, DNA profiling in criminal investigations has increased over the years. However, the ethical considerations of DNA profiling in India have yet to be examined adequately.

Purpose: The study aimed to examine the ethical considerations of DNA profiling in India and compare them with international guidelines. By examining the ethical considerations of DNA profiling in India, this study seeks to contribute to the ongoing discourse on the responsible use of DNA profiling in forensic investigations.

Methodology: The study used a qualitative research design, and data were collected by reviewing relevant literature and laws.

Findings: The findings indicate that the Indian legal framework has gaps in addressing the ethical considerations raised by international guidelines, such as the admissibility of DNA evidence in court, oversight of DNA laboratories, safeguards against discrimination, and privacy and confidentiality protections.

The comparative analysis highlights the need for strengthening the legal framework in India, adopting best practices from international guidelines, and incorporating safeguards to protect against discrimination and ensure the privacy and confidentiality of individuals. By adopting these recommendations, India can ensure that DNA profiling is conducted ethically and responsibly, promoting public trust in the criminal justice system and upholding the rights of all individuals.

Details

The Framework for Resilient Industry: A Holistic Approach for Developing Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83753-735-8

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 June 2021

Mahananda Kanjilal

In an economic sense, urbanization is a process of transformation of rural economy to modern economy. It is measured by the increase in urban population to total population. In…

Abstract

In an economic sense, urbanization is a process of transformation of rural economy to modern economy. It is measured by the increase in urban population to total population. In India, urbanization is increasing over the last 100 years. In 1911, urbanization in India was 10.29% which reached to 31.16% in 2011. In 2018, the urban population of India was 460.78 million or 34% of the total population. In the present world, economic growth of an economy is highly dependent on the growth of Information and Communication technology (ICT). The Indian Information Technology (IT) industry also has created an important place in the global IT market. The objective of this chapter is to search for a relationship between urbanization and development of the ICT sector in India. Secondary time series data of urbanization of India have been analyzed for census years from 1951 to 2011. The data on ICT have been taken for the period 2014–2015. The data have been collected from Internet and Mobile Association of India, Telecom Regulatory Authority of India, Cellular Operations Association of India, and District Information System of Education. For analyzing the development of ICT sector in India the variables taken are e-infrastructure, telephone density per 100 persons, mobile subscribers per 100 persons, mobile subscribers with Internet, schools with computers, and e-participation. Hypothetically, growth of urbanization is expected to develop the ICT sector. From the analysis it comes out that apart from some exceptions, the relatively economically developed and urbanized states of India are found to have a developed ICT sector. Whereas in relatively less urbanized states the development of ICT sectors are not up to the mark.

Details

Comparative Advantage in the Knowledge Economy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-040-5

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 13 October 2008

Indra Nath Mukherji

In the above example, India is more productive in both, chemicals as well as ceramics. However, while Bangladesh is thrice as productive domestically in respect to ceramics as…

Abstract

In the above example, India is more productive in both, chemicals as well as ceramics. However, while Bangladesh is thrice as productive domestically in respect to ceramics as compared to chemicals, India is only twice as productive in the same product relative to chemicals. It will be worthwhile for Bangladesh to specialise in the production of ceramics in which it has a comparative advantage and for India to specialise in the production of chemicals. Both countries stand to gain through trade provided that for each unit of chemical Bangladesh imports from India it has to part with less than three units of ceramics to India, while India, too, gains if for each unit of chemical it sells Bangladesh it can get more than two units of ceramics. Thus, when trade takes place, it benefits both parties when the ratio of exchange for each unit of chemicals varies between >2 and <3 units of ceramics. The exact rate of exchange would depend on relative bargaining power of the traders. A value nearer to 3 will indicate larger bargaining power for the Indian exporter, and a value nearer to 2 would indicate greater bargaining power for the Bangladeshi exporter. In general, if the relative gains are higher the lower the elasticity of demand for the product and the greater the value addition to the product. Thus, manufactured products generally fetch better exchange as compared to primary products.

Details

Conflict and Peace in South Asia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-534-5

Article
Publication date: 17 June 2024

Sonica Rautela, Nehajoan Panackal and Adya Sharma

India has been on the pathway of improvement concerning healthcare and health outcomes of its population. However, India must overcome its unique challenges and cover a long…

Abstract

Purpose

India has been on the pathway of improvement concerning healthcare and health outcomes of its population. However, India must overcome its unique challenges and cover a long journey ahead. This mandates a need for a high-quality, contemporary and community-based health system that promises consistent and quality healthcare, is trusted and valued by all its citizens, considers the changing population needs and should be affordable and accessible.

Design/methodology/approach

The study examines various dimensions and elements associated with the integrated healthcare system in India and uses input, process and output structural measures.

Findings

The present paper proposes an integrated, comprehensive healthcare system in India that endorses participation from diverse stakeholders such as the government, organizations, the community and individuals who can contribute uniquely. It also focuses on defined and measurable output that can make health a topic of social movement or “Jan Andolan” and create a sustainable and integrated care system.

Originality/value

The study is unique as it focuses on the role of stakeholders in health care. The research emphasized the involvement of the government, community, people and organizations in developing an integrated healthcare ecosystem that includes modern technology, skilled employees, enough finance, governance, efficient delivery platforms and top-tier infrastructure. The model’s output is focused on healthcare that is inexpensive, accessible, available, accountable and user-centered. This would gradually improve everyone’s health and well-being.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 May 2024

H. Maheshwari, Anup K. Samantaray, Rashmi Ranjan Panigrahi and Lalatendu Kesari Jena

The significance of financial literacy (FL) in deciding how to allocate one’s investment capital has recently attracted much attention from various market participants and…

Abstract

Purpose

The significance of financial literacy (FL) in deciding how to allocate one’s investment capital has recently attracted much attention from various market participants and stakeholders. The study examines how FL affects individual investors' investment decisions (ID) in emerging markets. Additionally, the study investigates the potential mediating effects of attitude (ATT) and overconfidence bias (OCB) on the association between FL and ID.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed a structured questionnaire to collect data from 311 individual investors in India, using both convenience and snowball sampling methods. The collected data were analysed using Partial Least Square Structural Equation Modelling (PLS-SEM) and processed through SMART PLS 4.0 software to test the study’s hypotheses.

Findings

FL alone may not greatly affect ID, but the study enhances understanding of investor behaviour by examining how ATT and OCB mediate the link between FL and ID. The findings imply that FL, combined with positive ATT and overconfidence, empowers individual investors with the knowledge and skills for appropriate decision-making.

Practical implications

This research would benefit financial institutions, financial experts, and individual investors in India since it enables them to evaluate the causes and biases affecting their IDs and manage their portfolios accordingly. Policymakers should develop appropriate FL programs for investors to make informed decisions to achieve financial well-being.

Originality/value

The paper is exceptional in its approach as it delves into the mediating function of ATT and OCB in the intricate association between FL and ID. This innovative approach sets it apart from other studies in the field, making it a unique contribution to literature.

Peer review

The peer review history for this article is available at: https://publons.com/publon/10.1108/IJSE-05-2023-0370

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 May 2024

Kavita Pandey, Surendra S. Yadav and Seema Sharma

The purpose of this paper is to validate the theoretical finding that digital MNEs avoid physical presence norms of permanent establishment and royalty characterization rules for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to validate the theoretical finding that digital MNEs avoid physical presence norms of permanent establishment and royalty characterization rules for business and royalty taxation, respectively, to escape tax incidence in the market economy, using information, communication and technology features and transfer pricing (TP) manipulations.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple case studies of MNEs from technology sector, based on judicial decisions in 141 cases, over taxability of profits earned from Indian economic activities. Additional in-depth case study of the Uber Group to study the tax avoidance structures under platform economy, by routing of Indian profits through The Netherlands, a tax haven.

Findings

The study finds a significant number of digital MNEs earning profits from India and avoiding tax by defying physical presence and royalty characterization. In majority of the cases, demand-side business activities are discharged through incorporating and remunerating affiliates at cost plus low markup, thus avoiding tax incidence, using TP manipulations under the arm’s length principle applied by governments for benchmarking the intragroup transactions of the MNEs.

Research limitations/implications

The research findings validate the view that digital features promote tax avoidance in the market economy.

Originality/value

The originality of the study lies in the validation of profit shifting through digital features from the developing market economy and portending that digital MNEs defy physical presence to avoid business taxation through TP manipulations.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 28 May 2024

Julie Sunil

This case study allows students to appreciate the value of standard operating procedures in customer management. This case study emphasises the role of employees in delivering…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

This case study allows students to appreciate the value of standard operating procedures in customer management. This case study emphasises the role of employees in delivering superior customer experience. This case study explores many facets of customer experience, reputation, social class membership and standard operating procedures (SOPs). Students will be able to apply theories of customer experience, behavioural psychology and service dimensions relevant to the airline industry. After completing this case study, students will be able to do the following:1. Evaluate the value of SOPs in Customer ManagementThis case study refers to the need for adhering to SOPs to deal with complex situations. Students will be able to evaluate whether compliance to SOPs could have helped Air India avoid the crisis or was it possible that a culture of absolute commitment to customer wellbeing could have prevented the crisis.2. Apply the theory of defensive attribution in customer grievance handling. Discuss if reducing customer effort in getting their problem solved can result in superior customer service.The victim had attributed the blame for not insisting on filing a complaint to the crew. Air India crew had defended their actions or lack of it by stating that they had followed the rule book. Students will be able to appreciate the need for a swift redressal mechanism to protect the self-image and self-esteem of the person/group involved. They will also understand that customer service interactions designed to solve customer problems swiftly and easily can be a very simple dictum to guide all employees in their decision-making while handling a customer complaint.

3. Evaluate the relationship between customer satisfaction and customer experience and examine the value of net promoter score (NPS) to study customer satisfaction.

Air India Airlines was catering to varied customer groups such as the Indian diaspora, large student population pursuing education abroad, first-time flyers and the rising middle class with travel aspirations. Customer expectations vary across segments and change over their lifetime. Airline staff must trace customer corridors and deliver on customer expectation across the touch points that matter to them to ensure meaningful and relevant service delivery. Students will have an opportunity to evaluate the NPS in measuring customer satisfaction and debate whether it is a sufficient metric to guide the organisation on delivering and monitoring customer experience.

4. Examine why reputation risk management and not crisis management should be the focus of Air India in delivering superior customer service because nearly 70%–80% of market value for a company comes from its intangible assets such as brand equity and reputation.

Students will discuss crisis management i.e. handling the threat to reputation after it has occurred and reputation risk management i.e. proactively managing potential threats to its reputation by taking timely actions to avoid or mitigate it. There are three factors (reputation reality gap, changing beliefs and expectation and weak internal coordination) that determine reputational risks. Students can evaluate this model to determine if Air India should address these three factors to manage its reputation proactively.

Case overview/synopsis

This case study is set around an incident that happened on 26 November 2022, on Air India flight bound for Delhi from New York when an inebriated 34-year-old man had peed on a 72-year-old woman. The perpetrator of the crime had walked free, and the victim was left dissatisfied with how the cabin crew had handled her ordeal. Air India Airlines was launched in 1932 by industrialist JRD Tata and nationalised in 1953. In 2021, Tata Group acquired the 90-year-old Air India from the Government of India for $2.4bn (INR 18,000 crore) and appointed Campbell Wilson as chief executive officer and managing director. The incident brought to the fore the customer management issues that Wilson had to address. First on the list of Air India’s turnaround plan was delivering “exceptional customer experience”. How was it going to achieve it because the Indian aviation ecosystem lacked infrastructure such as airports, airspace, competition and customer preference-based services? There was also shortage of pilots, engineers, technicians, air-traffic controllers and technocrats to occupy positions within security agencies and regulatory bodies. With Air India’s acquisition, the Tata Group had to find innovative solutions to deal with decades of internal neglect, non-performance and labour union problems. This case study is relevant to address real issues of customer experience, consumer psychology, reputation risk management and standard operating procedures in service management.

Complexity academic level

This case is suitable for both undergraduate and postgraduate level students of business management. It can also be used for training service personnel of aviation industry.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 8: Marketing

1 – 10 of over 77000