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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2021

Krishnadas Nanath and Shivani Ajit Kumar

This paper aims to test the effectiveness of communication platforms in conveying the importance of sustainability messages focusing on electronic waste (e-waste) recycling

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to test the effectiveness of communication platforms in conveying the importance of sustainability messages focusing on electronic waste (e-waste) recycling. While corporate communication has been explored well, this research explores the influence of communication medium on the shift in attitude and behavioural intention of higher education students.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental design approach was used with quantitative data analysis to address the research questions.

Findings

The results revealed that the text form of communication was more effective in conveying the e-waste recycling message. Students demonstrated a significant shift in attitude and call for action when they read the sustainability article instead of watching a video with the same message.

Practical implications

With several universities trying to integrate sustainability in their curriculum, this research provides guidelines on effective communication methods for students. It also sheds light on the choice of platforms that can be used by organisations to reach out to their employees to convey sustainability-related messages.

Originality/value

The paper addresses sustainability communication in a university by exploring the best method of communication. The results open up new conversations on the media richness theory in the context of sustainability.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 26 May 2020

Rafia Afroz, Mohammad Muhibbullah, Puteri Farhana and Mohammad Niaz Morshed

To achieve proper waste management, the disposal of electronic waste (e-waste) is one suitable method. Most developing countries, including Malaysia, are facing lack of…

Abstract

Purpose

To achieve proper waste management, the disposal of electronic waste (e-waste) is one suitable method. Most developing countries, including Malaysia, are facing lack of e-waste recycling facilities and low household participation. Using a survey method using a questionnaire, this study aims to examine the intention of Malaysian households to drop-off their mobile phones to the nearest collection boxes (n = 600).

Design/methodology/approach

This study expanded the theory of planned behavior by adding environmental awareness and knowledge. In addition, the cost of disposal and the convenience of the available disposal infrastructure were measured as two parts of the perceived behavioral control.

Findings

The results of this study show that environmental knowledge and awareness have a significant impact on attitudes toward recycling intention of the households. In addition, it was also found that the attitude and cost of disposal infrastructure is positively related to household intention.

Originality/value

These results show that if e-waste collection boxes are provided to the nearest community and e-waste management information is distributed, this will increase household participation in e-waste management.

Details

Ecofeminism and Climate Change, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2633-4062

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Karishma Chaudhary and Prem Vrat

The purpose of this paper is to analyze e-waste management systems in Germany, Switzerland, Japan and India and benchmark best practices in the Indian scenario.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze e-waste management systems in Germany, Switzerland, Japan and India and benchmark best practices in the Indian scenario.

Design/methodology/approach

The first part of the research paper focuses on the description of e-waste management systems in the above-mentioned countries using a case study analysis approach while the second part analyzes, evaluates and compares e-waste management systems performance based on seven performance indicators using a five-point scale. Finally, the RADAR chart approach is used to benchmark the best practices of e-waste management in these countries in the Indian scenario.

Findings

The study finds that India is lagging far behind from Germany, Switzerland, and Japan in e-waste management despite being the fifth largest e-waste generator across the globe. India must adopt best practices followed in these nations like a dedicated agency to oversee and coordinate the e-waste management, coordination among different value chain partners involved in e-waste management, development of infrastructure to collect and process e-waste, monitoring and control of all processes and stakeholders, etc.

Practical implications

The study suggests the solution to the loopholes in the Indian e-waste management system by adopting the collection, recycling and reporting mechanism followed in German, Swiss and the Japanese e-waste management system. There is a dire need to improve e-waste management systems in India as only 5 percent of e-waste is processed through the organized sector.

Social implications

E-waste is increasing at an alarming rate and most of e-waste in India is being handled by the unorganized sector, where rudimentary methods are used to process e-waste severely damaging the environment and health of workers. The unorganized market employs 0.5m child laborers. Hence, routing the e-waste to the organized sector will result in social benefits by putting a check on unsafe practices and will create green jobs.

Originality/value

This paper’s contribution lies in extracting the best practices followed in nations excelling in e-waste management and recommend their implications in the Indian scenario. This study is aimed at all the stakeholders, but especially at policy-makers and producers, who have the onus to tackle the e-waste problem.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Cigdem Gonul Kochan, Saba Pourreza, Huguette Tran and Victor R. Prybutok

The rapid consumption of new electronic devices has expanded the volume of electronic waste (e-waste) and created a potential threat to the environment. Recycling of…

Abstract

Purpose

The rapid consumption of new electronic devices has expanded the volume of electronic waste (e-waste) and created a potential threat to the environment. Recycling of e-waste (eCycling) can help stem the proliferation of e-waste and its environmental threat. In order to increase this positive involvement in eCycling and design effective eCycling programs, a better understanding of eCycling behaviors is needed. The purpose of this paper is to employ the Theory of Reasoned Action as a framework to develop a model to identify the determinants of eCycling behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

To assess the model, a survey of 327 university students is undertaken. To analyze the eCycling behavior from the survey data, a structural equation modeling technique is used.

Findings

The findings suggest that: attitudes and moral norms positively influence eCycling behavior; the higher the awareness of consequences, the more the eCycling involvement; and perceived convenience is an important factor that leads to more involvement in eCycling.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited by the student sample and campus environment that might confine the generalizability of the study. Also, additional variables need to be examined in order to better explain eCycling behavior. The result of the study provides insights for organizations to build successful eCycling programs, engage young adults such as college students in eCycling, and increase involvement in eCycling.

Practical implications

This study provides insights that can help supply chain managers to better understand the consumer involvement in eCycling. Managers’ understanding of eCycling behavior would encourage eCycling involvement by placing drop-off units in convenient locations and by creating campaigns that motivate consumers to return their e-waste. An increased consumer involvement in eCycling can help manufacturing companies lower the cost of e-waste across the supply chain and regain the value of returned materials by adopting reverse logistics.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the stream of eCycling literature by investigating students’ eCycling intentions and behaviors on a university campus. The paper develops an understanding of how eCycling involvement might be improved.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2020

Yigit Kazancoglu, Melisa Ozbiltekin, Yesim Deniz Ozkan Ozen and Muhittin Sagnak

This study aims to propose an electronic waste collection and classification system to enhance social, environmental and economic sustainability by integrating data-driven…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to propose an electronic waste collection and classification system to enhance social, environmental and economic sustainability by integrating data-driven technologies in emerging economies.

Design/methodology/approach

GM (1, 1) model under grey prediction is used in this study in order to estimate the trend of the amount of collected electronic waste in emerging economies.

Findings

It is revealed that the amount of collected electronic waste is increasing day by day, and within the framework of sustainability in the process of collecting and classification of electronic waste, digital technologies were found to be lacking. It has been determined that this deficiency, together with the increasing amount of electronic waste, has caused environmental, social and economic damage to emerging economies.

Originality/value

The main originality of this study is integrating electronic waste collection and classification processes with data-driven technologies and sustainability, which is a relatively new subject.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Swati Kwatra, Suneel Pandey and Sumit Sharma

Despite legislation in place, there is still a gap in knowledge and awareness of the communities on the issues of e-waste handling and management. It is important to…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite legislation in place, there is still a gap in knowledge and awareness of the communities on the issues of e-waste handling and management. It is important to understand the knowledge and awareness levels of the consumers of electronic products who ultimately become the generators of e-waste in a community. The current study is based on a survey conducted in an urban setting to understand people's perception about the genesis of issues related to e-waste and its management. The purpose of this paper is to study the findings that could help in designing customized awareness programmes for addressing this concern more effectively.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted in Delhi to understand public knowledge and awareness related to e-waste management in the city and country. A limited random survey was conducted with a sample size of 400 individuals in Delhi from middle class belonging to different educational backgrounds and professions. Personal interview method was used to collect in-depth information related to the issues of e-waste and its management. A questionnaire was developed and pilot tested before actual start of the survey. The questionnaire consisted of two sections – first about baseline information related to their age, family size, family income and educational background and second on their knowledge and awareness regarding e-waste and its management. Also, the practices they followed regarding e-waste at their household level were enquired. The questionnaire consisted of both open-ended and close-ended questions. Most of the questions had multiple-choice options, which made it easy for the respondents to answer them appropriately. The open-ended question gave the respondents ample time and space to express their views. The open-ended questions besides strengthening the close-ended questions provided a lot of qualitative information and made the study interesting. Apart from just interviewing, informal interactions were also used as a tool for data collection. During the course of the study, informal interactions were done with respondents to familiarize them with the objectives of the present study, their role and benefits to them from the study.

Findings

The present study aimed to gauge the awareness levels and practices of people regarding e-waste management. The survey conducted in Delhi revealed that significant fraction of middle-class population is still unaware of the issue; however, on getting the information they were able to link the impacts of improper management of e-waste with detrimental health outcomes. For those who knew about it, the main sources of information to them were found to be internet, and print media. However, despite some awareness about the issue, most respondents were totally unaware about correct ways of its recycling and management. An important finding of the study was that 12-26 per cent people replace their major electronic goods like refrigerators, food processors, personal computers and music systems within the first three years of purchase. Discarding products within their periods of useful lives leads to enhanced generation of e-wastes. Along with e-waste generation, this also puts additional stress over the resources used for manufacturing of these products. On management of e-waste, most of the respondents opined of need of having efficient recycling units and effective mass awareness programmes. The survey also revealed the willingness of users to pay extra cost for proper management of e-waste provided that there is proper cost sharing between consumers and producers. This also raises an important aspect of extended producer responsibility (EPR). EPR puts additional responsibility and onus on the manufacturer of the product to not only produce durable quality of products but also take back the obsolete products and manage the e-waste. This also means that the manufacturers will have to use recyclable material in manufacturing of new products for economic management of e-waste at the later stage. Although, in Indian context it would be a challenge to implement the concept of EPR, especially with the active informal sector. The respondents quite adequately put equal responsibilities on the government, consumers and producers for effective e-waste management. The study clearly highlights the issues perceived by the middle-class population of Delhi and can be replicated in other major cities for re-authentication of the facts. The study could prove to be important in designing awareness programme related to the issue.

Originality/value

This paper presents the results of a questionnaire survey-based study that was employed to understand the perception of a sample of respondents. Analysis of the data reveals that the knowledge on the issue of e-waste is minimal and requires massive awareness drives for senitization.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Jecton Anyango Tocho and Timothy Mwololo Waema

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of e-waste management practices in Kenya and selected countries. It develops an ideal regulatory framework for e-waste

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of e-waste management practices in Kenya and selected countries. It develops an ideal regulatory framework for e-waste management in Kenya.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology adopted for this paper includes collecting data using interviews, direct observation and literature review. Both qualitative and quantitative methods are used.

Findings

Waste is an emerging stream of solid waste in Kenya. It has become a major concern due to the high volumes generated, its hazardous fractions and the lack of policies applicable to its disposal. Gaps are identified in the areas of awareness levels, e-waste management technology, financing, collection, disposal, monitoring, and stakeholder collaboration.

Research limitations/implications

The study area is limited to Nairobi and its environs. With regard to product, the paper focuses on ICT equipment.

Practical implications

The proposed framework has direct practical policy implications to manufacturers who ought to reduce e-waste from production, consumers who should adopt safe disposal practices, recyclers/informal actors who ought to use environmentally friendly methods and government agencies that enforce e-waste policies.

Social implications

Adoption of the proposed framework has positive socio-economic impacts on job creation, reduced crime and sound environmental management.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the body of knowledge on the e-waste problem from the perspective of developed as well as developing countries. It points out best practices for socio-economic development and fronts arguments for sustainable environmental management.

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2013

Amanze Rajesh Ejiogu

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview on the e‐waste topic, highlight the economic arguments for dumping e‐waste in developing countries and examine the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview on the e‐waste topic, highlight the economic arguments for dumping e‐waste in developing countries and examine the issues around the e‐waste problems in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology adopted is based on a review of existing literature, personal observation and interviews.

Findings

Electronic waste, or e‐waste, has emerged as a major problem in quite a number of developing countries, as well as an opportunity for development and economic growth. As a result of its high toxic content, it creates problems of environmental pollution and is a hazard to human health when not handled properly. However, there is a huge demand for good quality, second‐hand equipment in developing countries and there seem to be strong economic arguments for exporting scrap electronic and electrical equipment to those countries. The e‐waste trade has grown in Nigeria, causing several socio‐economic problems.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the growing body of knowledge on e‐waste in developing countries, especially Nigeria. It provides insight into the economic arguments that encourage the continuance of the e‐waste problem.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2020

Alastair Marke, Carmen Chan, Gozde Taskin and Theo Hacking

The objectives of this research are to (1) fill the evidence gap of circular business activities and (2) enrich the knowledge base about the drivers of and barriers to…

Abstract

Purpose

The objectives of this research are to (1) fill the evidence gap of circular business activities and (2) enrich the knowledge base about the drivers of and barriers to circular economy business model (CEBM) that supports e-waste reduction in China’s mobile electronics industry. To answer the overarching research question of whether there are CEBMs emerging to address e-waste in China’ mobile electronics industry, we in this paper divided it into three sub-questions: (1) What CEBMs can support e-waste reduction? (2) Is there evidence for their implementation in China? and (3) What are the drivers of and barriers to these business model innovations?

Design/methodology/approach

We started with setting the scene on the importance of better e-waste management and the scale of e-waste problem in China. Building on the oft-quoted ReSOLVE framework, developed by EMF (2015) and consolidated in Lewandowski (2016), we have refined from it 11 CEBMs to suit the context of e-waste reduction. These 11 models include regenerate, life cycle extension, take-back services, product sharing systems, optimise resource value, produce on demand, circular supplies, resource recovery, industrial symbiosis, product-as-a-service and transformative innovation. We have mapped these refined models against the evidence of circular business practices identified in the corporate sustainability reports of eight out of top 12 mobile electronics manufacturers in China.

Findings

Our research findings show that six out of these 11 CEBMs are de facto practised in many of these companies. They include life cycle extension, collection services, optimise resource value, circular supplies, resource recovery and industrial symbiosis, although circular economy is still early-stage endeavours in the industry. As confirmed in our expert and company interviews, CEBM stems largely from profit and policy drivers. The key to building successful CEBMs to eliminate e-waste is, indeed, multi-stakeholder collaboration across the mobile electronics industry, which involves effective collection, reuse and recycling systems.

Originality/value

The lessons learnt can promote peer learning among EEE manufacturers and inform policymakers of effective strategies to create an enabling environment in which circular economy models can thrive.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2021

Daniel Côté, Sylvie Gravel, Stéphanie Gladu, Bouchra Bakhiyi and Sabrina Gravel

This article explores the protective measures and the occupational health and safety (OHS) prevention strategies in place in the formal electronic equipment recycling (e…

Abstract

Purpose

This article explores the protective measures and the occupational health and safety (OHS) prevention strategies in place in the formal electronic equipment recycling (e-recycling) industry, more specifically in the Greater Montreal area (Quebec, Canada) and their consequences: health inequalities and level of compliance with environmental standards.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted using two respondent-specific questionnaires, one for workers and one for supervisors. Data collection and analytic procedures drew from qualitative content analysis. It was tempted to identify differences in OHS practices in relation to the workers' employment status and to link the companies' OHS concerns to their level of compliance with environmental standards.

Findings

The article highlights specific OHS issues in the formal e-recycling industry. Enforcing compliance with environmental standards as a lever for promoting OHS appears to be a promising strategy. Another main finding was the workforce diversity and related OHS vulnerabilities in this industry and the challenges they pose to employers' ability to adequately and equally reach and protect all workers involved.

Originality/value

To date, too little attention appears to have been paid to working conditions and worker protection in this rapidly growing sector. Specific prevention programmes could be implemented and adapted to the industry's diverse workforce and its multiple OHS vulnerabilities. This issue calls for the international community to take responsibility, as many electronic waste (e-waste) generated worldwide is shipped to developing countries, where lack of regulation and control is much more striking in a sector that remains very largely informal.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

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