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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Gonca Telli Yamamoto

The purpose of this study is to examine the university selection criteria of students for better university management with the use of marketing tools.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the university selection criteria of students for better university management with the use of marketing tools.

Design/methodology/approach

This study consists of a survey on students attending a foundation university in Turkey. The questionnaire method has been chosen in order to determine the important criteria having an impact on the student views towards university selection. The students had been admitted to a foundation university in the 2005‐2006 period when within the same universities various departments were included in the study.

Findings

The results indicate student evaluation and selection criteria in this period of time.

Practical implications

This paper examines the criteria that affects the selection of students and, in detail the students' point of view towards the university evaluation and selection in Turkey. This will help the university manager's decision making on the marketing tools they use.

Originality/value

Selecting a university is a long‐term commitment and a very important decision for the high school students and/or graduates. Academic, social, physical factors and facilities are some important criteria for university selection. This study concerns the importance of these criteria in detail.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 20 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 3 March 2021

Krishnadas Nanath, Ali Sajjad and Supriya Kaitheri

University selection in higher education is a complex task for aspirants from a decision-making perspective. This study first aims to understand the essential parameters…

Abstract

Purpose

University selection in higher education is a complex task for aspirants from a decision-making perspective. This study first aims to understand the essential parameters that affect potential students' choice of higher education institutions. It then aims to explore how these parameters or priorities have changed given the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Learning about the differences in priorities for university selection pre- and post-COVID-19 pandemic might help higher education institutions focus on relevant parameters in the post-pandemic era.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a mixed-method approach, with primary and secondary data (university parameters from the website and LinkedIn Insights). We developed a university selector system by scraping LinkedIn education data of various universities and their alumni records. The final decision-making tool was hosted on the web to collect potential students' responses (primary data). Response data were analyzed via a multicriteria decision-making (MCDM) model. Portal-based data collection was conducted twice to understand the differences in university selection priorities pre- and post-COVID-19 pandemic. A one-way MANOVA was performed to find the differences in priorities related to the university decision-making process pre- and post-COVID-19.

Findings

This study considered eight parameters of the university selection process. MANOVA demonstrated a significant change in decision-making priorities of potential students between the pre- and post-COVID-19 phases. Four out of eight parameters showed significant differences in ranking and priority. Respondents made significant changes in their selection criteria on four parameters: cost (went high), ranking (went low), presence of e-learning mode (went high) and student life (went low).

Originality/value

The current COVID-19 pandemic poses many uncertainties for educational institutions in terms of mode of delivery, student experience, campus life and others. The study sheds light on the differences in priorities resulting from the pandemic. It attempts to show how social priorities change over time and influence the choices students make.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2021

Irsyadillah Irsyadillah and Mohamed Salem M Bayou

This study aims to investigate the selection and use of introductory financial accounting (IFA) textbooks in the context of achieving the objectives of accounting…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the selection and use of introductory financial accounting (IFA) textbooks in the context of achieving the objectives of accounting education to provide both discipline-specific skills and liberal education.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts a qualitative research design to collect data through semi-structured interviews with 33 accounting educators across Indonesia. This study uses the institutional theory approach to explain how accounting textbooks are selected and used to meet the objectives of accounting education at universities.

Findings

The study provides evidence of the adoption of a systematic procedure for the selection of recommended IFA textbooks. The selection was driven by the technical-regulatory objective of providing technical training. This objective also guides the use of the recommended textbooks. In a sense, accounting educators were more concerned about responding to institutional pressures of preparing accountants for work in the accounting industry rather than providing students with a liberal education that promotes critical thinking and problem-solving skills.

Research limitations/implications

This study focuses on the selection and use of IFA textbooks. Further research should examine the contents of various accounting textbooks and obtain feedback from the people involved in the publication of the textbooks.

Originality/value

The findings of this study have important implications for accounting educators. They can use these findings to improve their selection and use of accounting textbooks.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2008

Esko Keskinen, Juhani Tiuraniemi and Anna Liimola

The purpose of this paper is to find out which factors contribute to the decisions of the students when they choose their place of study among the six psychology…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to find out which factors contribute to the decisions of the students when they choose their place of study among the six psychology departments of the Universities in Finland.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involved a survey questionnaire. Responses were received from 1,668 people.

Findings

It was found that the major determinants for university choice for applicants in Finland were the special characteristics of the teaching and research in the psychology departments. An aptitude test seems to the applicants like a natural part of the selection process since the lack of one put off some applicants.

Practical implications

Psychology departments have a clear opportunity to influence the applicants' decisions by making their teaching and research characteristics known to the applicants. In practice, that would be possible by collaborating more with upper secondary schools and open universities.

Originality/value

The process of student selection is very important in psychology as the graduating psychologists will operate in a field filled with responsibility and their incompetent conduct may damage their clients.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2020

Hsiao-Pei Yang, Dorothy Yen and John M.T Balmer

Drawing on infrequent purchase and university selection literature, the purpose of this study is to make theoretical contributions to the identification and comprehension…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on infrequent purchase and university selection literature, the purpose of this study is to make theoretical contributions to the identification and comprehension of the ‘once-in-a-lifetime purchase’ (OILP) phenomenon.

Design/methodology/approach

Data derived from in-depth interviews with 34 Taiwanese and 11 Chinese students over two phases suggest that an OILP qualitatively differs from other purchases.

Findings

The principal traits of OILP are quadripartite in character: zero-repurchase intention; permanency of purchase; high social pressure and extensive information search. The results contribute to the theoretical understanding of the higher education (HE) sector as one type of OILP provider, and managerial implications are discussed specifically for the HE institutions.

Practical implications

Marketing managers of HE institutions should be cognisant of the range of information collected by prospective OILP customers from a variety of different sources. Prospective students who are OILP customers perceive non-marketing information as more reliable than marketing promotional materials and will better assist them during their decision making.

Originality/value

The paper makes explicit theoretical and instrumental contributions to our identification and comprehension of the OILP phenomenon, thus shedding new light on studies of consumer purchase decision literature. It also extends previous understanding of HE marketing by showing that choosing an HE degree is, in fact, an OILP and, as such, requires a new way of approaching prospective students as consumers.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2019

Jennifer Scott

The purpose of this paper is to examine the efficacy of the strategies that new, regional universities use for recruiting international postgraduate research students (IPRSs).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the efficacy of the strategies that new, regional universities use for recruiting international postgraduate research students (IPRSs).

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory, qualitative cross-case study analysis was used to address a problem and associated gap in the literature, identified from a review of academic literature and government statistics. Case studies comprised multiple data sources, including interviews and questionnaires with 66 employee and student respondents and document reviews.

Findings

A disparity between the views of students and employees regarding effective recruitment strategies was apparent. This led to divergence between the needs of prospective students and institutional strategies used during recruitment. Findings include suggestions to improve such strategies.

Research limitations/implications

The study provides a basis for future research on higher education recruitment for new and regional universities and for IPRSs. As the research focused on two Australian universities, knowledge obtained should be explored further.

Practical implications

Results suggest students considering overseas postgraduate research study prioritize information, readily available online, about the university’s research focus and capacity, the features of surrounding communities and the regional impact of the research. Results also suggest that focusing on developing institution-to-institution and researcher-to-researcher relationships provides a mechanism by which the institution can enhance its international reputation to attract more students.

Originality/value

Limited research focuses specifically on recruitment of IPRSs. The results can support new, regional universities to review and modify their strategies for benefit to students and universities.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2011

Heidi Ross and Yimin Wang

This chapter begins with an examination of the complexities, challenges, and contradictions that are presented by policies and practices associated with the College…

Abstract

This chapter begins with an examination of the complexities, challenges, and contradictions that are presented by policies and practices associated with the College Entrance Examination (CEE) and higher education admissions during the three decades of China's reform era. It then focuses on recent reform polices as outlined in the national education 2020 Blueprint (National Educational Reform and Development Plan, 2010–2020), which deepens the debate about the role of the CEE in shaping the mission of education and distributing opportunities and “talents” affecting social mobility, university autonomy, and national development. The CEE stands at the epicenter of educational reform, criticized for hamstringing institutional autonomy and innovation; reducing schooling to a soulless competition; and unfairly advantaging urban children with greater educational opportunities. This chapter explains the staying power of the CEE and concludes that China's examination culture will intensify in the short term, as the CEE is clung to as a last bastion of meritocracy and is reinforced by the state's desire to cultivate what the 2020 Blueprint labels elite “selected innovative” and “pragmatic” talents. Content and policy analysis is used to explain CEE reform since 1978 and provide a backdrop for discussion of pedagogical, market, and compensatory reform strategies that tinker at the CEE's margins. To take into account micro-institutional processes involved in the CEE's creation, maintenance, and resistance to change, we examine stakeholders' frames of common perception through 2010 interviews with exam candidates and their parents, and faculty and administrators from four Gansu Province universities. These interviews illustrate what the CEE means to diverse families and reveal how admission policies impact students, teachers, and university faculty and administrators at both elite and non-elite higher education institutions. The slow change of CEE reform discourse and practice as China inches from examination-based selection criteria to ability-based selection criteria has begun to redefine the trajectories of recognized “elites,” whose actions are motivated by and reflect the changing needs of society and economic development. Friction and resistance on the ground, therefore, point to the ways in which the changing needs of the labor market, the policy mandates of the national agenda, the meritocratic ideal and the educational desires of China's citizenry intertwine to shape, and be shaped by, CEE policies.

Details

The Impact and Transformation of Education Policy in China
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-186-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

A. Anaba Alemna

There are now three Universities in Ghana with a total enrollment of about 10,000 students. The oldest and largest is the University of Ghana, Legon, which was established…

Abstract

There are now three Universities in Ghana with a total enrollment of about 10,000 students. The oldest and largest is the University of Ghana, Legon, which was established in 1948 as a University College preparing students for the degrees of the University of London. The University of Science and Technology at Kumasi was the second to be established in the country. It started as a College of Technology in 1951 and was raised to University status in 1961. The University of Cape Coast came into being in 1962, mainly to produce graduate teachers for expanding secondary schools and teacher‐training colleges. All the universities have libraries which provide services to faculty members, scholars and students. The number of books allowed to be borrowed, however, depends on the status of the user, with faculty members having more privileges than students at all the universities.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 10 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1960

John Wellens

In this country it is a mark of the Education Acts and other educational reforms that their by‐products have often proved more significant than the direct changes.

Abstract

In this country it is a mark of the Education Acts and other educational reforms that their by‐products have often proved more significant than the direct changes.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 2 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Renata Siemieñska

The second half of the twentieth century brought an enormous rise in the education level in almost all Eastern European countries. Education became a mass phenomenon. Many…

Abstract

The second half of the twentieth century brought an enormous rise in the education level in almost all Eastern European countries. Education became a mass phenomenon. Many new universities emerged, and the number of their employees engaged in research and teaching increased.

Details

Higher Education in a Global Society: Achieving Diversity, Equity and Excellence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-182-8

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