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Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2020

Alun Epps

By the end of this chapter on minors, internet-enabled devices and online shopping behaviour, readers will be able to

  • Identify fundamental benefits and harm engendered when…

Abstract

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this chapter on minors, internet-enabled devices and online shopping behaviour, readers will be able to

  • Identify fundamental benefits and harm engendered when minors have unlimited access to internet-enabled devices

  • Locate the main catalysts of benefit and harm to minors due to internet usage

  • Show how a priori studies have created a rich and balanced narrative in the field of benefits and harm of the internet to minors

  • Argue how the benefits outweigh the harm (or vice versa) impacting on minors in unlimited use of the internet

  • Develop strategies to enhance the benefits and limit the harm caused by unlimited access to the internet

Identify fundamental benefits and harm engendered when minors have unlimited access to internet-enabled devices

Locate the main catalysts of benefit and harm to minors due to internet usage

Show how a priori studies have created a rich and balanced narrative in the field of benefits and harm of the internet to minors

Argue how the benefits outweigh the harm (or vice versa) impacting on minors in unlimited use of the internet

Develop strategies to enhance the benefits and limit the harm caused by unlimited access to the internet

Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

Kristien Daems, Ingrid Moons and Patrick De Pelsmacker

This study aims to explore which media 9- and 10-year-old children and 12- and 13-year-old teenagers encounter and which campaign elements (media, spokesperson, appeal and…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore which media 9- and 10-year-old children and 12- and 13-year-old teenagers encounter and which campaign elements (media, spokesperson, appeal and message) are most appreciated by these target groups in awareness campaigns to raise their advertising literacy.

Design/methodology/approach

The study applies a methodology that is commonly used in design sciences to the field of advertising. Co-creation workshops with minors and professionals are used for the development of awareness campaign stimuli. In the first study, four co-creation workshops with 19 children (11 girls and 8 boys) of the fourth grade and four co-creation workshops with 16 teenagers (10 girls and 6 boys) of the seventh grade were organised. In the second study, nine professionals who work for and/or with minors or have experience in product design or marketing participated in a co-creation workshop.

Findings

Children are best approached though traditional media, whereas social media are used best to reach teenagers. Children prefer cartoons, whereas the results for the most appealing spokesperson in teenagers are mixed. Humoristic campaigns with a short message are preferred by both target groups.

Research limitations/implications

The results offer implications for practice and public policy with respect to awareness campaign building and social media marketing campaigns targeted at children and teenagers. To further corroborate the findings of this study, more pupils from different schools and different age groups should be studied. Moreover, the method used in this study can be applied in future research on awareness campaigns aimed at minors for other causes.

Originality/value

The methodological contribution of the study is the application of co-creation tools and techniques on the development of advertising campaigns for minors.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Maria Luisa Cassandro and Felix Hofer

Outlines the legislation in Italy covering advertising to children, who are regarded as the most vulnerable among consumers. Relates Italy’s legislative policy to its…

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Abstract

Outlines the legislation in Italy covering advertising to children, who are regarded as the most vulnerable among consumers. Relates Italy’s legislative policy to its membership of the European Union and therefore to Community law. Describes the self‐regulation regime as administered by the Institute for Advertising Self‐Regulation, and the general principles of child protection with regard to safety, children’s lack of experience, and the natural feelings of adults to adolescents and children. Moves on to specific areas such as cigarettes, alcohol, pharmaceuticals, toys, electronic media, radio and TV, and the Internet; children under 14 must not be used in TV commercials or promotions.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Monica Recalde and Elena Gutiérrez-García

This study aims to center on understanding how stakeholder engagement processes improve online child protection in telecom companies. The literature review and findings…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to center on understanding how stakeholder engagement processes improve online child protection in telecom companies. The literature review and findings shed light on the management of networks to identify, prevent and mitigate the adverse impacts of information and communication technologies (ICTs)[1] and to find opportunities in terms of new policies and services development.

Design/methodology/approach

Three multinational telecom companies were analyzed with a qualitative focus combining three research tools: the analysis of 81 corporate reports, self-administered questionnaires and semi-structured interviews.

Findings

Firms establish a collaborative network with a large number of stakeholders such as public authorities, non-governmental organizations, educational institutions, representatives of families and expert researchers. The outcomes of these networks range from the development of new products and services (filters, child safety software and protection apps) to the co-creation of new corporate policies with a high social impact (self-regulation, sectorial codes, awareness initiatives and reporting).

Practical implications

This study outlines guidelines for the industry in identifying, engaging and making decisions in a collaborative way when managers have to engage with multiple stakeholders regarding child protection. The academic debate and the empirical findings have many practical implications for ICT companies whose users are children and teenagers.

Originality/value

Despite its significance, stakeholder management is underexplored in the literature of protection for young people. The academic field and the professional arena appear to have little to say regarding how executives manage engagement processes.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2021

Samer Forzley

This study aimed to investigate the level of adoption of digital marketing by cannabis vendors in the state of Colorado.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to investigate the level of adoption of digital marketing by cannabis vendors in the state of Colorado.

Design/methodology/approach

The study surveyed a random sample of 30 cannabis vendors in the state of Colorado. The analysis of the vendors’ use of digital marketing methods was conducted using a rubric based on a modified 7C Framework.

Findings

In the state of Colorado, the cannabis industry is nascent and has made an initial investment in digital marketing. While most companies had deployed a website, these websites featured basic elements of digital marketing. Though limited, the industry has made initial attempts to engage customers in a socially responsible manner. The industry would also benefit from better age verification, educational programs and profit sharing.

Originality/value

The study furthers the application of 7C Framework used in evaluating e-commerce sites for cannabis marketing.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2021

Mohammed Sawkat Hossain

The authors make a fundamental initial effort to conduct a systematic review analysis on “cryptocurrency,” mainly to analyze the way it has been changing the “stereotype”…

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Abstract

Purpose

The authors make a fundamental initial effort to conduct a systematic review analysis on “cryptocurrency,” mainly to analyze the way it has been changing the “stereotype” financial transactions, and also identify the probable unexplored research avenues on this innovative investment regime. The study aims to draw the landscape of the current state, prospects, challenges, trends and possible agendas of cryptocurrency in the global market.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a quali-quantitative approach widely known as meta-literature review, the synthesis analysis on “cryptocurrency” is conducted. Methodologically, the authors review and analyze the most recent and relevant papers preferably published between 2016 and 2020 in leading business and finance journals of ISI Web of Science (ISI WOS) through bibliometric analysis particularly coupled with content analysis.

Findings

The findings of the meta-analysis summarize the relevant stylized facts of the cryptocurrency market: distinctive features of blockchain technology, decentralized payment method, low-cost facility, ensuring pseudo-anonymity, independence from central authority, double spending attack protection, organic and instantaneous nature, among others. In addition, the analysis identified several future research regimes: pricing model, prospect of investment regime, hedging properties, volatility dynamics, information asymmetry, underlying risk factors and bubble-like nature in global cryptocurrency market.

Practical implications

This academic novelty significantly contributes to enhance our knowledge on the current state-of-the-art of digital finance, outlines the research agenda and eventually provides important investment implications for financial managers, research analysts, investors, market practitioners, regulatory compliance professionals and policymakers. Therefore, the findings shed the lights on new investment opportunity in the global market.

Originality/value

Cryptocurrency, virtual currency or digital asset having cryptography for idiosyncratic security features, seems to be a persistent paradigm shift in the digitalized financial system. Despite the continuing growth, the academic research on cryptocurrency is still at nascent stage, particularly because researchers did not deeply draw attention at this financial innovation. In addition, the authors argue that none of the earlier studies yet conducted a meta-analysis on this latest investment regime. Therefore, this review study is the initial attempt to fill up the gap in the finance literature.

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Catharine M. Curran and Jef I. Richards

Over the past 30 years the United States has grappled with the regulation of children's advertising in various media. The same debate that occurred in the 1970's in the US…

Abstract

Over the past 30 years the United States has grappled with the regulation of children's advertising in various media. The same debate that occurred in the 1970's in the US over banning children's advertising is heating up in the EU today. As with other regulatory issues the regulation of children's advertising involves trade‐offs. In the US, the First Amendment rights of the advertisers must be balanced with the government interest in protecting children. The regulation of children's advertising also involves balancing the competing interests of advocacy groups, legislators, broadcasters and advertisers. Advocacy groups have been very effective in focusing public attention on the issues of children's advertising. One of the most vocal and impactful groups was Action for Children's Television (ACT), whose efforts culminated in the passage of the 1990 Children's Television Act. Once that was accomplished, ACT was disbanded. In more recent years, however, the Centre for Media Education (CME) has replaced ACT in calling for regulation of children's advertising. CME was instrumental in pushing the 1996 FTC investigation related to 900 telephone numbers directed at children, and is now behind the Child Online Protection Act (COPA). The same questions raised nearly 30 years ago by ACT are now being cast in the US in terms of the Internet, otherwise little has changed. Each new innovation in media and technology ushers similar questions to the table, and the same balancing act must again be employed to answer the basic question: how far do we go to protect our children? The US's answer to this question offers insights for other countries seeking answers to similar questions.

Details

International Journal of Advertising and Marketing to Children, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6676

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Esther Charlotte Moon

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how changes in K-12 educational delivery methods in the USA impacts students as 1:1 device programs become a required tool for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how changes in K-12 educational delivery methods in the USA impacts students as 1:1 device programs become a required tool for learning. This change produces gaps in knowledge and understanding of the digital environment and exposes minors to risk. Mandatory technology integration by school districts places the ethical responsibility on school districts to prepare students to use the digital environment to mitigate risk.

Design/methodology/approach

The author’s literature review focused on the impact of personal device integration in education on students. The author surveyed teachers in the district on what they perceived as risk to students accessing the digital environment and what they believe creates value in digital citizenship instructional content. The author also gathered information while serving on the school district technology steering committee and digital citizenship working group.

Findings

Mandatory 1:1 device programs used for learning provide unlimited access to the digital environment. This technology integration creates digital knowledge gaps in understanding among students and exposes them to risk or dangers such as loss of privacy, psychological harms and engaging in or being a victim of illegal online activities. School districts are responsible for providing a remedy to close this gap and mitigate risk by developing learning content resources for teachers.

Social implications

As 1:1 device programs continue to grow in school districts in the USA, it is essential for students to learn to apply protocols and understand norms of the digital world. Providing a digital citizenship curriculum in a format such as a Google Site will offer educators access to instructional content that teaches students to apply protocols, understand norms of the internet and social media and foster critical thinking to analyze power structures, biases and recognize manipulation online. Student must learn how to apply rules that challenge assumptions behind the digital content they see, and they must be able to identify and resolve digital practices and behaviors that are problematic, so they are prepared to participate in a digital society.

Originality/value

This perspective may be relevant to school districts contemplating personal device integration, providing insight into how 1:1 device use impacts students and develops an ethical position for creating digital citizenship resources for teachers.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Liesbeth Hellemans, Eva Lievens and Peggy Valcke

This paper aims to examine the challenges raised by hybrid advertising strategies for principles of identification and separation, included in various regulatory…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the challenges raised by hybrid advertising strategies for principles of identification and separation, included in various regulatory instruments, and the Audiovisual Media Services Directive (AVMSD) in particular.

Design/methodology/approach

First, this paper describes two examples of hybrid (television) advertising formats, with a potential interconnection between editorial and commercial content, such as advertorials and commercial overlays. This section is followed by an analysis of the origins and key elements of the identification and separation principle. Next, the implementation in legislation of Belgium (Flanders region), The Netherlands and the UK, and decisions of media regulators in those countries are explored to assess how the principles are interpreted in practice. Finally, the authors identify the concrete challenges that these formats raise and frame those against the background of European policy developments.

Findings

The analysis shows that the current interpretation of the identification and separation principles conflicts with the inherently integrated features of hybrid advertising formats, especially commercial overlays. To remedy this, the authors propose strengthening the identification principle, for instance, by developing cross-media labels and framing this within a co-regulatory framework where advertisers and media service providers take up their responsibility to respect fundamental principles and protect less cognitively skilled consumers, such as children.

Originality/value

This paper aims to contribute to the current re-thinking of the legal framework with regard to new commercial communication techniques, convergence and public interest goals. This can be framed against the background of the revision of the AVMSD and the Digital Single Market Strategy.

Book part
Publication date: 8 December 2021

Nipa Saha

This chapter explores the development of advertising regulations governing food advertising to children in Australia since the 1940s. By introducing the advertising and…

Abstract

This chapter explores the development of advertising regulations governing food advertising to children in Australia since the 1940s. By introducing the advertising and marketing self-regulatory system, the Australian Government is taking a neoliberal approach, advocating for the free market to initiate and sustain the country’s economic development, instead of greater government regulation. By examining the primary and secondary literature, such as government reports and research, and newspaper and academic articles, this chapter outlines different regulatory initiatives adopted by both the government and food industry to limit food and beverage advertising to children on television and online, in order to prevent obesity rates increasing in children. This chapter synthesizes and critically evaluates food industry and public health studies, government and non-government reviews, and other research studies to evaluate the influence of self-regulation on Australian television food advertising within the neoliberal context since the 1990s. It contributes to the literature on food advertising regulations for children in Australia by offering evidence of how the government, public health authorities and the food industry have attempted to keep pace with changes in the advertising, marketing and media industries by developing and reviewing advertising codes. It identifies the loopholes that exist in these self-regulatory codes and concludes that Australia’s current advertising regulatory arrangements are failing to protect our children from unhealthy food marketing on television, especially on relatively under-regulated online platforms such as social media and branded websites. The issues identified in this chapter could aid the food and beverage industry, as well as the self-regulatory system, to offer comprehensive and applicable solutions to combat Australia’s obesity crises by implementing new legislations that align with different marketing practices.

Details

Media, Development and Democracy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-492-9

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 5000