Search results

1 – 10 of over 10000

Abstract

Details

Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Human Dignity and Human Rights
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-821-6

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Win Tadd and Paul Dieppe

This paper describes the creation of the educational materials developed as part of the Dignity and Older Europeans Project. Following a discussion of the development…

Abstract

This paper describes the creation of the educational materials developed as part of the Dignity and Older Europeans Project. Following a discussion of the development process, the materials themselves are described. The materials includes a poster of the dignity balance, which contains five core messages and illustrates the impact of both enhancing and violating individual dignity. The second product is a leaflet that also includes the dignity balance and lists of actions and approaches that will promote dignity or result in indignity. The final product to date is a multidisciplinary workbook which is described in some detail. The workbook Educating for Dignity provides a brief outline of the theoretical model of dignity, and four different sections based on the empirical findings:• understanding dignity• old age ‐ what is it like to be an older person?• dignity in care• the impact of the system.In each section quotations from participants, supplemented with images and cartoons, are used to illustrate various aspects of dignity. Readers are then set exercises to promote reflection about the issues raised. The workbook also contains a discussion of the exercises, an extensive bibliography and some policy implications. Finally, dissemination and use of the materials are explored.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Lennart Nordenfelt and Andrew Edgar

This paper presents the theoretical model of dignity that has been created within the Dignity and Older Europeans (DOE) Project. The model consists of four kinds of dignity

Abstract

This paper presents the theoretical model of dignity that has been created within the Dignity and Older Europeans (DOE) Project. The model consists of four kinds of dignity: the dignity of merit; the dignity of moral stature; the dignity of identity; and Menschenwurde.1) The dignity of merit depends on social rank and formal positions in life. There are many species of this kind of dignity and it is very unevenly distributed among human beings. The dignity of merit exists in degrees and it can come and go.2) The dignity of moral stature is the result of the moral deeds of the subject; likewise it can be reduced or lost through his or her immoral deeds. This kind of dignity is tied to the idea of a dignified character and of dignity as a virtue. The dignity of moral stature is a dignity of degree and it is also unevenly distributed among humans.3) The dignity of identity is tied to the integrity of the subject's body and mind, and in many instances, although not always, dependent on the subject's self‐image. This dignity can come and go as a result of the deeds of fellow human beings and also as a result of changes in the subject's body and mind.4) Menschenwurde is the universal dignity that pertains to all human beings to the same extent and cannot be lost as long as the person exists.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Ralph Palliam and Robert Ankli

The pursuit of the culture of work as dignity is rarely a focus of scholarly writings. One dominant, widely shared and accepted cultural value of work ethic is the belief…

669

Abstract

Purpose

The pursuit of the culture of work as dignity is rarely a focus of scholarly writings. One dominant, widely shared and accepted cultural value of work ethic is the belief that it is work that accords dignity to a human being. While seemingly neglected in traditional management research, the concepts of dignity and well-being have experienced renewed attention from the humanities and social sciences. The ability to utilize this sense of dignity becomes a critical role of human resources in advancing self-worth and self-respect. The relationships between worker and management are considered within the culture of work as dignity.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper. A theoretical foundation of work as dignity is developed. It is uses Hofstede’s analysis of work-related cultural values in different countries. Work is identified as dignity that is equated to a universal property like the doctrine of modern democracy that is enjoyed by other societies.

Findings

If work accords dignity to humans, the ability to establish a sense of employee self-worth and self-respect and to enjoy the respect of others becomes critical objectives of management. This notion results in moving high-performance workplaces to high quality workplaces resulting in managerial conduct that is fair, equitable, reasonable and just. This paper is a call to rethink management theory from a humanistic perspective and highlights the role and protection of human dignity as a cornerstone in management theory. The concept of dignity elevates human responsibilities to the degree that they support the promotion of well-being.

Research limitations/implications

This is a conceptual paper. A rigorous empirical study needs to be conducted to substantiate the theoretical foundation.

Practical implications

Guidance is offered to managerial responsibility in promoting work as dignity, support for work as dignity, maintaining the dominant culture of work as dignity and identifying high-performance versus high-quality workplace.

Social implications

Dignity is a virtue. Cultural differences play a less meaningful role and individuals become more alike than unalike. Together with the dictates of modernizing technology, there is a measure of uniformity to how everyone approaches the world.

Originality/value

This study adds value in a somewhat different vein by presenting dignity as a central purpose of human life. This paper is a call to rethink management theory from a humanistic perspective and highlights the role and protection of human. The ability to establish a sense of employee self-worth and self-respect and to enjoy the respect of others becomes critical objectives of management. Moving high-performance workplaces to high-quality workplaces results in management conduct that is fair, equitable, reasonable and just. Human responsibilities need to be elevated to a degree that they support the promotion of well-being.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 13 September 2022

Charlotte Roos, Anna Swall, Lena Marmstål Hammar, Anne-Marie Boström and Bernice Skytt

Dignity and well-being are key aspects of the legislation and policies that regulate care of older persons worldwide. In addition, care of older persons should be…

Abstract

Purpose

Dignity and well-being are key aspects of the legislation and policies that regulate care of older persons worldwide. In addition, care of older persons should be person-centred. Dignity and well-being are described as results of person-centred care (PCC). The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding of important aspects for older persons to experience dignity and well-being in residential care facilities (RCFs).

Design/methodology/approach

This study had a qualitative approach, and individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 older persons living in RCFs. Data were analysed using inductive content analysis.

Findings

To experience dignity and well-being older persons emphasized the importance of preserving their identity. To do this, it was important to be able to manage daily life, to gain support and influence and to belong to a social context. However, the findings indicate a need for improvements.

Practical implications

Insights into older persons’ experiences of important aspects for experiencing dignity and well-being in RCFs can be used by first-line managers and registered nurses when designing improvement strategies to promote PCC.

Originality/value

Dignity and well-being are described as results of PCC. The findings provide an understanding of what older persons perceive as important for experiencing dignity and well-being in RCFs. The findings are useful when designing improvement strategies to promote PCC.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 18 September 2018

Jessica Liddell and Katherine M. Johnson

There is extensive research documenting the physical outcomes of childbirth, but significantly less on socio-psychological outcomes. Investigating women’s perception of…

Abstract

Purpose

There is extensive research documenting the physical outcomes of childbirth, but significantly less on socio-psychological outcomes. Investigating women’s perception of dignified treatment during birth contributes to a salient, under-examined aspect of women’s childbirth experiences.

Methodology/approach

We use a two-part conceptualization of dignity, respect and autonomy, to understand how birth experiences and interactions either facilitate or undermine women’s perceived dignity. Data came from the Listening-to-Mothers I survey, the first nationally representative study of postpartum women in the United States (n = 1,406). Through linear regression analysis, we separately modeled women’s perception of respectful treatment and women’s perception of medical autonomy during birth.

Findings

Overall women reported high scores for both autonomy and respect. Differences between the models emerged related primarily to the role of interventions and provider support. While women’s perceived dignity is related to elements that she brings in to the delivery room (e.g., birth knowledge, health status), much variation was explained by the medical encounter itself (e.g., type of medical interventions, pain management, nurse support, and number of staff present).

Research limitations/implications

This study is cross-sectional, and required either a telephone or internet access, thus limiting the full generalizability of findings. Two findings have direct practical relevance for promoting women’s dignity in childbirth. First, the number of staff persons present during labor and birth was negatively associated with both respect and autonomy. Second, that women with high levels of knowledge about their legal rights during childbirth were more likely to report high scores on the dignity scale. Limiting staff in the delivery room and including knowledge of legal rights in childbirth education or during prenatal visits may be two mechanisms to promote dignity in birth.

Originality/value

These findings address an important, under-examined aspect of women’s childbirth experiences. This study investigates how different birth experiences and interactions either promote or violate childbearing women’s perception of dignity, and has significant implications for the provision of maternal healthcare. The results reinforce the importance of focusing on the socio-psychological dimensions of childbirth.

Details

Gender, Women’s Health Care Concerns and Other Social Factors in Health and Health Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-175-5

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 July 2022

Antonio Pele

This chapter shows that Kant’s notion of human dignity can be understood as a novel ‘care of the self’ and an ‘art of not being governed’. Drawing on a Foucauldian…

Abstract

This chapter shows that Kant’s notion of human dignity can be understood as a novel ‘care of the self’ and an ‘art of not being governed’. Drawing on a Foucauldian approach, it demonstrates that Kant intends to shape an ethical subject that strives for freedom and self-mastery. It also argues Kant’s idea of dignity embodies a political and spiritual form of resistance against dominant relations of power and subjectivities. Thanks to this novel perspective, this chapter also offers novel insights on the political force of human dignity. With Kant, this notion becomes a ‘government of the self by oneself’.

Book part
Publication date: 12 July 2022

Olga Rosenkranzová

This chapter presents two examples of misinterpretation of the philosophical term and historical concept of human dignity in contemporary legal theory and practice…

Abstract

This chapter presents two examples of misinterpretation of the philosophical term and historical concept of human dignity in contemporary legal theory and practice. Current legal theories (R. Alexy) still introduce Pico’s concept of dignity regarding the human personality and personal (volitional and rational) abilities. The term ‘dignity’ is marginal for Pico and shows the spiritual way to the status of the original Adam. Pico’s concept of dignity is located in the area of spirit (hyperphysics), not metaphysics (soul) or physics (materials). Günter Dürig in his commentary to Grundgesetz also used the Kantian concept of human dignity. Dürig exaggerated this value and used it also for the area of physics (to protect the human being as a personality). For Kant, the term ‘dignity’ was also marginal, and he used it in the area of metaphysics (soul – especially the moral and rational parts), regarding transcendence for homo noumenon, not for homo phaenomenon. In general, it seems to be problematic to use the ideal of the dignity for the law, which regulates the social relations between concrete phenomenal personalities. There are parallels to Pico. The Kantian starting point was different from Pico, because Kant stays in the area of metaphysics (especially the moral and rational parts). Both consider freedom as a condition of dignity. The concept of autonomy of will is significant for both, but each thinks of it in different ways. For both, human being can become master of oneself, but in a different context.

Book part
Publication date: 12 July 2022

Saulo Monteiro Martinho de Matos

The central thesis developed during this study is the idea that human dignity must be understood as the right to be recognised as a participant in the institutional…

Abstract

The central thesis developed during this study is the idea that human dignity must be understood as the right to be recognised as a participant in the institutional practice of human and fundamental rights. This form of association between human dignity and human rights is a response to the various barbarities of the twentieth century, whether by fascist, Nazi, and socialist regimes in Europe, either by South African apartheid or by military dictatorships in Latin America. Human dignity after Auschwitz is the foundation for the construction of a post-metaphysical institutional morality, independent of an idealised concept of rational subjective personality and closer to the historical and material conditions to guarantee the political personality of every human being. In order to defend this thesis, the study is conducted in two steps. First, two conceptions of dignity will be discussed, namely dignity of man and human dignity. Second, it is intended to discuss how the modern conception was incorporated into the practice of human rights after Auschwitz as a way of responding to a crisis in the modern model of the practice of rights.

Details

Human Dignity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-390-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2016

Vicki Smith

In this tribute to Randy Hodson, I will demonstrate how the defining concept of his research – that “life demands dignity and meaningful work is essential for dignity”…

Abstract

In this tribute to Randy Hodson, I will demonstrate how the defining concept of his research – that “life demands dignity and meaningful work is essential for dignity” (Hodson, 2001, p. 3) – has led me to fundamentally reinterpret much of my earlier fieldwork, principally represented in Managing in the Corporate Interest: Control and Resistance in an American Bank (Smith, 1990) and Crossing the Great Divide: Worker Risk and Opportunity in the New Economy (Smith, 2001). I then suggest that we add a fifth condition to his formulation of challenges to dignity. Hodson identified four: management abuse, overwork, limits on autonomy, and contradictions of employee involvement. The framework needs to be contextualized within the fifth major challenge of our times: the broader environment of employment precariousness under neoliberalism that has deeply affected our micro-experiences at work, including those singled out by Hodson.

Details

A Gedenkschrift to Randy Hodson: Working with Dignity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-727-1

1 – 10 of over 10000