Search results

1 – 10 of over 9000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2019

Jack Donnelly

Abstract

Details

Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Human Dignity and Human Rights
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-821-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Win Tadd and Paul Dieppe

This paper describes the creation of the educational materials developed as part of the Dignity and Older Europeans Project. Following a discussion of the development…

Abstract

This paper describes the creation of the educational materials developed as part of the Dignity and Older Europeans Project. Following a discussion of the development process, the materials themselves are described. The materials includes a poster of the dignity balance, which contains five core messages and illustrates the impact of both enhancing and violating individual dignity. The second product is a leaflet that also includes the dignity balance and lists of actions and approaches that will promote dignity or result in indignity. The final product to date is a multidisciplinary workbook which is described in some detail. The workbook Educating for Dignity provides a brief outline of the theoretical model of dignity, and four different sections based on the empirical findings:• understanding dignity• old age ‐ what is it like to be an older person?• dignity in care• the impact of the system.In each section quotations from participants, supplemented with images and cartoons, are used to illustrate various aspects of dignity. Readers are then set exercises to promote reflection about the issues raised. The workbook also contains a discussion of the exercises, an extensive bibliography and some policy implications. Finally, dissemination and use of the materials are explored.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Lennart Nordenfelt and Andrew Edgar

This paper presents the theoretical model of dignity that has been created within the Dignity and Older Europeans (DOE) Project. The model consists of four kinds of dignity

Abstract

This paper presents the theoretical model of dignity that has been created within the Dignity and Older Europeans (DOE) Project. The model consists of four kinds of dignity: the dignity of merit; the dignity of moral stature; the dignity of identity; and Menschenwurde.1) The dignity of merit depends on social rank and formal positions in life. There are many species of this kind of dignity and it is very unevenly distributed among human beings. The dignity of merit exists in degrees and it can come and go.2) The dignity of moral stature is the result of the moral deeds of the subject; likewise it can be reduced or lost through his or her immoral deeds. This kind of dignity is tied to the idea of a dignified character and of dignity as a virtue. The dignity of moral stature is a dignity of degree and it is also unevenly distributed among humans.3) The dignity of identity is tied to the integrity of the subject's body and mind, and in many instances, although not always, dependent on the subject's self‐image. This dignity can come and go as a result of the deeds of fellow human beings and also as a result of changes in the subject's body and mind.4) Menschenwurde is the universal dignity that pertains to all human beings to the same extent and cannot be lost as long as the person exists.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Ralph Palliam and Robert Ankli

The pursuit of the culture of work as dignity is rarely a focus of scholarly writings. One dominant, widely shared and accepted cultural value of work ethic is the belief…

Downloads
640

Abstract

Purpose

The pursuit of the culture of work as dignity is rarely a focus of scholarly writings. One dominant, widely shared and accepted cultural value of work ethic is the belief that it is work that accords dignity to a human being. While seemingly neglected in traditional management research, the concepts of dignity and well-being have experienced renewed attention from the humanities and social sciences. The ability to utilize this sense of dignity becomes a critical role of human resources in advancing self-worth and self-respect. The relationships between worker and management are considered within the culture of work as dignity.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper. A theoretical foundation of work as dignity is developed. It is uses Hofstede’s analysis of work-related cultural values in different countries. Work is identified as dignity that is equated to a universal property like the doctrine of modern democracy that is enjoyed by other societies.

Findings

If work accords dignity to humans, the ability to establish a sense of employee self-worth and self-respect and to enjoy the respect of others becomes critical objectives of management. This notion results in moving high-performance workplaces to high quality workplaces resulting in managerial conduct that is fair, equitable, reasonable and just. This paper is a call to rethink management theory from a humanistic perspective and highlights the role and protection of human dignity as a cornerstone in management theory. The concept of dignity elevates human responsibilities to the degree that they support the promotion of well-being.

Research limitations/implications

This is a conceptual paper. A rigorous empirical study needs to be conducted to substantiate the theoretical foundation.

Practical implications

Guidance is offered to managerial responsibility in promoting work as dignity, support for work as dignity, maintaining the dominant culture of work as dignity and identifying high-performance versus high-quality workplace.

Social implications

Dignity is a virtue. Cultural differences play a less meaningful role and individuals become more alike than unalike. Together with the dictates of modernizing technology, there is a measure of uniformity to how everyone approaches the world.

Originality/value

This study adds value in a somewhat different vein by presenting dignity as a central purpose of human life. This paper is a call to rethink management theory from a humanistic perspective and highlights the role and protection of human. The ability to establish a sense of employee self-worth and self-respect and to enjoy the respect of others becomes critical objectives of management. Moving high-performance workplaces to high-quality workplaces results in management conduct that is fair, equitable, reasonable and just. Human responsibilities need to be elevated to a degree that they support the promotion of well-being.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 September 2021

Anjali Tiwari, Tanuja Sharma and Radha R. Sharma

Understanding managers’ experiences of workplace dignity (WPD) is critical to working with others in an organization. However, there is limited research available on this…

Abstract

Purpose

Understanding managers’ experiences of workplace dignity (WPD) is critical to working with others in an organization. However, there is limited research available on this subject. This study aims to expand the knowledge of WPD by exploring managers’ understanding of WPD and their experiences of both affirmation and denial of dignity at work.

Design/methodology/approach

Critical incident technique (CIT) has been used to explore the themes related to managers’ perceptions of WPD through their lived experiences. Affective event theory supports the use of CIT in the current study context.

Findings

Findings unfolded many new aspects of WPD, which have not been explored in the past. An exploration and analysis of the three research questions related to managers’ understanding, affirmation and denial experiences of WPD have added new insights to the existing literature. These have been further segregated under the following four main factors: internal, external, process and feelings. Finally, the authors conclude that external factors that arrive during exchange relationships play an important role in managers’ understanding and experiences of WPD in India.

Originality/value

To the best of the knowledge, this is a seminal study to have explored managers’ understanding of WPD in India. It aims to add to the literature by enriching the construct of WPD. Practical implications include a deeper managerial understanding of the affirmational practices and factors which will positively impact WPD.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 18 September 2018

Jessica Liddell and Katherine M. Johnson

There is extensive research documenting the physical outcomes of childbirth, but significantly less on socio-psychological outcomes. Investigating women’s perception of…

Abstract

Purpose

There is extensive research documenting the physical outcomes of childbirth, but significantly less on socio-psychological outcomes. Investigating women’s perception of dignified treatment during birth contributes to a salient, under-examined aspect of women’s childbirth experiences.

Methodology/approach

We use a two-part conceptualization of dignity, respect and autonomy, to understand how birth experiences and interactions either facilitate or undermine women’s perceived dignity. Data came from the Listening-to-Mothers I survey, the first nationally representative study of postpartum women in the United States (n = 1,406). Through linear regression analysis, we separately modeled women’s perception of respectful treatment and women’s perception of medical autonomy during birth.

Findings

Overall women reported high scores for both autonomy and respect. Differences between the models emerged related primarily to the role of interventions and provider support. While women’s perceived dignity is related to elements that she brings in to the delivery room (e.g., birth knowledge, health status), much variation was explained by the medical encounter itself (e.g., type of medical interventions, pain management, nurse support, and number of staff present).

Research limitations/implications

This study is cross-sectional, and required either a telephone or internet access, thus limiting the full generalizability of findings. Two findings have direct practical relevance for promoting women’s dignity in childbirth. First, the number of staff persons present during labor and birth was negatively associated with both respect and autonomy. Second, that women with high levels of knowledge about their legal rights during childbirth were more likely to report high scores on the dignity scale. Limiting staff in the delivery room and including knowledge of legal rights in childbirth education or during prenatal visits may be two mechanisms to promote dignity in birth.

Originality/value

These findings address an important, under-examined aspect of women’s childbirth experiences. This study investigates how different birth experiences and interactions either promote or violate childbearing women’s perception of dignity, and has significant implications for the provision of maternal healthcare. The results reinforce the importance of focusing on the socio-psychological dimensions of childbirth.

Details

Gender, Women’s Health Care Concerns and Other Social Factors in Health and Health Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-175-5

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2016

Vicki Smith

In this tribute to Randy Hodson, I will demonstrate how the defining concept of his research – that “life demands dignity and meaningful work is essential for dignity”…

Abstract

In this tribute to Randy Hodson, I will demonstrate how the defining concept of his research – that “life demands dignity and meaningful work is essential for dignity” (Hodson, 2001, p. 3) – has led me to fundamentally reinterpret much of my earlier fieldwork, principally represented in Managing in the Corporate Interest: Control and Resistance in an American Bank (Smith, 1990) and Crossing the Great Divide: Worker Risk and Opportunity in the New Economy (Smith, 2001). I then suggest that we add a fifth condition to his formulation of challenges to dignity. Hodson identified four: management abuse, overwork, limits on autonomy, and contradictions of employee involvement. The framework needs to be contextualized within the fifth major challenge of our times: the broader environment of employment precariousness under neoliberalism that has deeply affected our micro-experiences at work, including those singled out by Hodson.

Details

A Gedenkschrift to Randy Hodson: Working with Dignity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-727-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2016

Paul Thompson and Kirsty Newsome

Randy Hodson’s categories offer an ambitious, comprehensive framework for analysing the objective and subjective conditions that shape dignity and resistance at work. In…

Abstract

Randy Hodson’s categories offer an ambitious, comprehensive framework for analysing the objective and subjective conditions that shape dignity and resistance at work. In this chapter, we engage with Hodson and his collaborators work through exploring its potential usefulness in helping understand the experience of low-skill and low-paid factory workers at the end of supermarket supply chains in the United Kingdom. In emphasising the purposeful and strategic actions of workers to attain and maintain dignity within work, and management-influenced conditions that destroy or deny it, Hodson’s perspectives overlap with themes in more recent labour process theory that elaborate expanded notions of labour agency. While we share such concerns, we also identify some limitations to the framework and its explanatory powers, particularly where threats to dignity are associated with concepts of abuse and mismanagement. Our investigations of the supermarket supply chain reveal that management, authority and work organisation in these plants is not, by and large, ‘abusive’, ‘chaotic’ or ‘anomic’. Such terminology creates the unavoidable impression of pre-rational workplaces based on arbitrary, personal power. In our cases, the plants are not much ‘mis-managed’ as managed rationally according direct and indirect pressures exerted through supply chain power dynamics. Hodson’s framework for addressing issues of dignity and to a lesser extent resistance, remain an indispensable but incomplete entry point for understanding its dynamics.

Details

A Gedenkschrift to Randy Hodson: Working with Dignity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-727-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2019

Hoda Mahmoudi

Abstract

Details

Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Human Dignity and Human Rights
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-821-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Roiyah Saltus and Christalla Pithara

Research evidence indicates the need for studies that explore the salience of dignity from the perspective of older people from a range of ethno-linguistic and cultural…

Abstract

Purpose

Research evidence indicates the need for studies that explore the salience of dignity from the perspective of older people from a range of ethno-linguistic and cultural backgrounds. Drawing findings from a mixed-methods study on social-care expectations of community-dwelling older women from black and minority-ethnic backgrounds, the purpose of this paper is to explore the interrelationships between life-course events (such as migration) and the roles adopted by the women throughout their lives, which shaped their understanding of dignity.

Design/methodology/approach

Face-to-face, semi-structured interviews with 32 older women in Wales were conducted in the participants’ first languages. The interview schedule was developed, piloted and peer-reviewed; it covered the themes of migration, perceptions of dignity, dignity in later life, perceptions of care and care with dignity. Transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. This paper focuses on what dignity meant to older women and how a sense of dignity was fostered in later life.

Findings

For the participants, a sense of dignity in later life was shaped by migration to the UK, and their shifting, transnational understanding of growing old in the UK and of the perceived worth and value of the roles they played. Although some women also saw other platforms (such as work and their status as professionals) as being of importance, a sense of purpose fostered in their roles as wives, mothers and grandmothers, and as mentors and guardians of cultural knowledge, underpinned their understanding of dignity, and reinforced their sense of acknowledgement and worth. Fostered from an early age through interactions with the family and close community (religious, cultural or ethnic), respect for older people was revealed to remain a key element of the participants’ personal and cultural value systems, as were the ways in which respect should be both earned and manifested. The sense of heightened vulnerability, because of advancing age, and the impact of cumulative negative encounters and racialised micro-aggressions, were real and pressing.

Practical implications

Given the changing demographic of the older population throughout Europe and the world, there is a need to raise awareness among policy makers and practitioners of the importance of dignity from a range of perspectives – providing first-hand accounts that bring these to life, and data that can be used to help develop effective interventions.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the understanding of dignity from a transnational, multi-ethnic perspective; the potential impact of multiple social positions (being old, being a woman, being a migrant and being from a minority-ethnic group) on the perception of being treated and regarded as important and valuable; and the need to raise awareness among policy makers and practitioners of the importance of dignity from a range of perspectives, providing first-hand accounts that bring these to life and that can be used to help develop effective social-care interventions.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 9000