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Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2020

Alun Epps

By the end of this chapter on minors, internet-enabled devices and online shopping behaviour, readers will be able to

  • Identify fundamental benefits and harm engendered when…

Abstract

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this chapter on minors, internet-enabled devices and online shopping behaviour, readers will be able to

  • Identify fundamental benefits and harm engendered when minors have unlimited access to internet-enabled devices

  • Locate the main catalysts of benefit and harm to minors due to internet usage

  • Show how a priori studies have created a rich and balanced narrative in the field of benefits and harm of the internet to minors

  • Argue how the benefits outweigh the harm (or vice versa) impacting on minors in unlimited use of the internet

  • Develop strategies to enhance the benefits and limit the harm caused by unlimited access to the internet

Identify fundamental benefits and harm engendered when minors have unlimited access to internet-enabled devices

Locate the main catalysts of benefit and harm to minors due to internet usage

Show how a priori studies have created a rich and balanced narrative in the field of benefits and harm of the internet to minors

Argue how the benefits outweigh the harm (or vice versa) impacting on minors in unlimited use of the internet

Develop strategies to enhance the benefits and limit the harm caused by unlimited access to the internet

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Sai Vijay Tata, Sanjeev Prashar and Chandan Parsad

The growth in online shopping activities has made online reviews a useful information source for customers. At the same time, the number of shoppers sharing their…

Abstract

Purpose

The growth in online shopping activities has made online reviews a useful information source for customers. At the same time, the number of shoppers sharing their experiences through reviews has also increased. Not enough research has been undertaken in the past to examine a comprehensive set of factors that influence review posting behaviour. Further, the influence of personality traits on such behaviour is mostly unexplored. The study aims to examine the impact of the system’s usefulness and ease of use, along with shoppers’ motivation for writing reviews, namely, rewards and associated costs.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the 3 M model of personality traits, this paper examined the impact of these personality traits on customers’ intent towards writing online reviews. A detailed review of the literature was undertaken to ascertain the pertinent factors, and the corresponding validated scales were obtained. The primary data was collected using an offline survey method, and 275 valid responses were recorded. The hypotheses were investigated through structural equation modelling on analysis of a moment structures 22.0.

Findings

The study observed the significant effects of both ease of use and usefulness, on shoppers’ attitude. This favourable attitude was further found to have a positive effect on shoppers’ intention to write reviews. Of the eight personality traits as predictors of shoppers’ intention to provide reviews, three (neuroticism, agreeableness and openness) were observed to be significant predictors. It was noted that intrinsic rewards influenced shoppers’ intention. Conversely, extrinsic rewards were found to be insignificant in influencing shoppers’ intention. Costs had a significant negative impact on the intention to write reviews.

Practical implications

The study presents theoretical and managerial implications. This paper suggests that for writing online reviews, the customers must perceive the review system to be simple, convenient and easy to use. It is pertinent for them to comprehend the usefulness of such reviews. Electronic retailers must highlight how the reviews are read and considered in making buying decisions. They must develop a system that enables the review writers to know the number of shoppers who have purchased the product after reading a particular review. E-retailers must strategize to highlight the intrinsic rewards available for shoppers to motivate them.

Originality/value

The present study examines the factors that motivate and influence shoppers to write online reviews. Using the conceptual framework of technology acceptance model, the self-determination theory and the 3 M framework of personality traits, the study investigates the factors that motivate shoppers to write reviews. The most significant aspect of the present study is the inclusion of eight personality traits for deciphering the relationship between personality traits and the intention to write reviews.

Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Abstract

Details

Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2021

Imam Salehudin and Frank Alpert

Worldwide In-app Purchase (IAP) revenues reached almost US$37 billion in 2017 and doubled that in 2020. Although the revenue from IAPs exceeds those from paid apps, only…

Abstract

Purpose

Worldwide In-app Purchase (IAP) revenues reached almost US$37 billion in 2017 and doubled that in 2020. Although the revenue from IAPs exceeds those from paid apps, only 5% of total app users make any IAPs. This paper investigates why some users will not make IAPs and develop a novel concept of users' Perceived Aggressive Monetization of IAPs as an alternative framework to explain IAP behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Given the newness of IAPs, this study uses qualitative research to understand the phenomenon and develop a model to explain the decision to spend on IAPs. In total, this study collected 4,092 unique user-generated comments from app user review sites and social media webpages where users discuss in-app purchasing.

Findings

The analysis reveals recurring themes that explain user unwillingness to make in-app purchases, such as conflicting meanings of free-to-play, perceived unfairness and aggressive monetization of IAP by app publishers, and self-control issues. Subsequent user interviews support the themes and suggest that IAP spending might be more impulsive.

Originality/value

The paper develops a new concept of perceived aggressive monetization. Additionally, it proposes a novel theoretical framework that future researchers can use to understand why some mobile game users are unwilling to pay for IAPs.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

Article
Publication date: 4 April 2018

Marion Garaus

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the new construct online shopper confusion and to identify online confusion causes and consequences.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the new construct online shopper confusion and to identify online confusion causes and consequences.

Design/methodology/approach

Data obtained from a projective technique and a quantitative study were analyzed to identify online shopper confusion causes. Two experiments employing different stimulus materials tested the conceptualized consequences of online shopper confusion.

Findings

Confusing online store elements are classified into three online confusion causes. Data yielded from two experiments using fictitious and real shopping scenarios as stimulus material show that a confusing internet retail process leads to negative consumer reactions.

Research limitations/implications

The resulting taxonomy of confusing online store elements offers guidance on the creation of non-confusing online shopping trips, and highlights the relevance of a non-confusing internet retail process. Online shopper confusion is linked to negative behavioral reactions. Consequently, this research offers an explanation for undesirable consumer reactions in internet retailing.

Practical implications

The findings provide practitioners with concrete insights into how the internet retail process confuses shoppers which help to assess the confusion potential of their existing online stores and consider confusion issues in the development of new online stores.

Originality/value

This research is the first to explore confusion during the internet retail process. The multi-method approach offers highly valid insights into the causes and consequences of online shopper confusion.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 May 2022

Stephanie Hui-Wen Chuah, Siriprapha Jitanugoon, Pittinun Puntha and Eugene Cheng-Xi Aw

This study aims to simultaneously examine the influence of demographic, psychographic and situational factors on consumers’ willingness to pay a price premium (WTPp) for…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to simultaneously examine the influence of demographic, psychographic and situational factors on consumers’ willingness to pay a price premium (WTPp) for robotic restaurants and to profile market segments based on consumers’ WTPp levels (positive, neutral and negative).

Design/methodology/approach

Using an online survey, the data were gathered from a sample of 897 Thai consumers who had dined at a robotic restaurant in the past 12 months. Structural equation modeling, chi-square tests and the one-way analysis of variance were used for data analysis.

Findings

Demographic (gender, age, income and marital status), psychographic (perceived advantages/disadvantages, personal innovativeness and personality traits) and situational factors (perceived health risk and self-protection behavior) significantly influence consumers’ WTPp for robotic restaurants. The positive price premium group differs significantly from the neutral and negative price premium groups in terms of demographic, psychographic and situational profiles.

Practical implications

The findings of this study help restaurateurs target the correct customers and set up appropriate price fences to safeguard profits and maximize return on investment.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature on technology-based services and hospitality by heeding the calls made by Ivanov and Webster (2021) and providing much-needed empirical evidence of possible changes in consumers’ WTPp for robot-delivered services in restaurants due to COVID-19.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2010

Paul Harvey, James K. Summers and Mark J. Martinko

We review past research on the relationship between attributional perceptions, emotions, and workplace aggression and develop a conceptual model that extends this research…

Abstract

We review past research on the relationship between attributional perceptions, emotions, and workplace aggression and develop a conceptual model that extends this research in two ways. First, we consider the influence of controllability attributions on the type (otherdirected, self-directed, hostile, non-hostile) and likelihood of aggressive responses to negative workplace outcomes and situations. Second, we consider the extent to which discrete negative emotions might mediate these attribution-aggression relationships. Implications for anticipating and preventing workplace aggression based on this conceptual model are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

Article
Publication date: 28 January 2013

Anna S. Mattila, Luisa Andreau, Lydia Hanks and Ellen E. Kim

This research aims to examine how consumers react to being ignored by a company once they have complained about an online service failure. The authors seek to propose that…

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Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to examine how consumers react to being ignored by a company once they have complained about an online service failure. The authors seek to propose that automatic reply e-mails to customer complaints are considered a form of cyberostracism, thus having equally harmful effects on customer perceptions as a mere no reply.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors first conducted a qualitative study to ensure that consumers feel ignored when companies fail to respond to their e-mails. This was followed by an experimental study that tested the research propositions. The experimental design was a 3 (ostracism) × 2 (severity of failure) factorial between-subjects design.

Findings

The results indicated that consumers did not perceive any significant difference between an automatic reply e-mail and no reply at all and perceived both to be a form of cyberostracism. It was also found that cyberostracism led to higher levels of negative emotions, lower levels of satisfaction, and higher levels of negative behavioural outcomes. The prediction that these impacts would be moderated by failure severity was partially supported.

Practical implications

These findings should alert retailers to the fact that when an online failure occurs, proactive and personalised recovery efforts are necessary to maintain customer loyalty and mitigate negative behavioural outcomes.

Originality/value

The authors extend the online failure literature by showing that automatic reply e-mail responses are perceived as cyberostracism and have an equally negative impact on consumer perceptions and post-failure behaviours as a mere no reply.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Ling Jiang, Kristijan Mirkovski, Jeffrey D. Wall, Christian Wagner and Paul Benjamin Lowry

Drawing on sensemaking and emotion regulation research, the purpose of this paper is to reconceptualize core contributor withdrawal (CCW) in the context of online

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on sensemaking and emotion regulation research, the purpose of this paper is to reconceptualize core contributor withdrawal (CCW) in the context of online peer-production communities (OPPCs). To explain the underlying mechanisms that make core contributors withdraw from these communities, the authors propose a process theory of contributor withdrawal called the core contributor withdrawal theory (CCWT).

Design/methodology/approach

To support CCWT, a typology of unmet expectations of online communities is presented, which uncovers the cognitive and emotional processing involved. To illustrate the efficacy of CCWT, a case study of the English version of Wikipedia is provided as a representative OPPC.

Findings

CCWT identifies sensemaking and emotion regulation concerning contributors’ unmet expectations as causes of CCW from OPPCs, which first lead to declined expectations, burnout and psychological withdrawal and thereby to behavioral withdrawal.

Research limitations/implications

CCWT clearly identifies how and why important participation transitions, such as from core contributor to less active contributor or non-contributor, take place. By adopting process theories, CCWT provides a nuanced explanation of the cognitive and affective events that take place before core contributors withdraw from OPPCs.

Practical implications

CCWT highlights the challenge of online communities shifting from recruiting new contributors to preventing loss of existing contributors in the maturity stage. Additionally, by identifying the underlying cognitive and affective processes that core contributors experience in response to unexpected events, communities can develop safeguards to prevent or correct cognitions and emotions that lead to withdrawal.

Originality/value

CCWT provides a theoretical framework that accounts for the negative cognitions and affects that lead to core contributors’ withdrawal from online communities. It furthers the understanding of what motivates contributing to and what leads to withdrawal from OPPC.

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