Search results

1 – 10 of over 176000
Article
Publication date: 19 February 2019

Alison Felce

Traditionally, apprenticeships have been the domain of further education and skills training providers, predominately at pre-higher education levels where management…

Abstract

Purpose

Traditionally, apprenticeships have been the domain of further education and skills training providers, predominately at pre-higher education levels where management, organisation, inspection and funding have little in common with those familiar to higher education. Higher level and degree apprenticeships have brought together different cultures and methods of designing, delivering and assessing knowledge, skills and behaviours, funding learners and learning providers, data reporting, quality management and its review or inspection. The purpose of this paper is to establish the primary concerns about managing quality in degree apprenticeships, the challenges the variances bring, how the challenges are being resolved and future work that may be required.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of a range of guidance and organisations involved in managing the quality of higher education in apprenticeships was undertaken. The primary focus is on the advice and guidance provided through the Quality Code and associated documentation, which are key to managing and assuring standards and quality in UK higher education. In addition, requirements and guidance provided through other bodies is considered along with the cross-sector groups charged with developing quality assurance processes for apprenticeships at all levels.

Findings

The paper shows a range of detailed guidance available to those entering the higher and degree apprenticeships arena and how the organisations involved in quality assurance of apprenticeships are working together to remove or mitigate concerns to ensure that quality is embedded and successfully managed.

Originality/value

Designing and delivering higher level and degree apprenticeships is a relatively new addition to UK higher education providers. There are long established practices to assure the quality and standards of UK higher education wherever and, however, it is delivered, in the UK, overseas and through online models. Apprenticeships across the UK have changed significantly over recent years, and new models, organisations and methods of working and funding have been introduced. This paper brings together key activity by the Quality Assurance Agency and other stakeholders to show how standards and quality can be managed and assured.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

John Creedy and Patrick Francois

Examines, using a simple model, the choice of appropriatecontributions of taxes and fees used to finance higher education. Atwo‐period model is developed in which…

Abstract

Examines, using a simple model, the choice of appropriate contributions of taxes and fees used to finance higher education. A two‐period model is developed in which individuals in cohort invest in higher education in the first period, and the interdependences between educational choice and the tax system are considered. The implications of majority voting and the maximization of a social welfare function, allowing for a trade‐off between equity and efficiency, are examined in progressive and proportional tax systems.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Zamzulaila Zakaria, Susela Devi Selvaraj and Zarina Zakaria

To provide evidence on the establishment of the internal audit function in the higher education institutions in Malaysia and also to obtain the perceptions of the…

5428

Abstract

Purpose

To provide evidence on the establishment of the internal audit function in the higher education institutions in Malaysia and also to obtain the perceptions of the management of the higher education institutions towards the role and scope of the internal audit.

Design/methodology/approach

Sample consisted of 17 public universities and 49 private universities in Malaysia and variables used by Gordon and Fischer were adopted for this study.

Findings

The findings revealed that a substantial number of private institutions of higher education do not have an internal audit function. The study also indicates that the management of both types of institutions have similar perceptions on the role of internal auditors and the important audit areas as there are no significant differences between public and private institutions of higher education.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of this study is that it only examines whether the scope of internal audit covers the areas mentioned by treasury circular or the IIA Guideline. It ignored the extent to which the higher education institutions comply with both guidelines. It is, therefore, suggested that future research could consider the degree of compliance to the above guidelines. The difference in the role of internal auditing between the education sector and other industries represents an interesting area for further research. Also, since this study only focuses on the perceptions of the management and the internal auditor themselves, the perception of other parties such as regulators and the audit committee on the role of internal audit in institutions of higher education will be an interesting area to explore for future research.

Practical implications

The failure to establish an internal audit function in the private universities calls for government intervention to ensure the existence of an internal audit function in the private sector higher education institutions.

Originality/value

The findings of this paper will be important in further refining the scope of the internal audit function in the higher educations institutions in Malaysia, especially to policymakers concerned with regulations governing the internal audit function.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 21 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 September 2018

Colin McCaig

Abstract

Details

The Marketisation of English Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-856-9

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Higher Education in a Post-Covid World: New Approaches and Technologies for Teaching and Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-193-1

Book part
Publication date: 27 November 2015

Cibele Yahn de Andrade

Enrollment in higher education in Brazil has been steadily growing and has reached 7 million recently. However, still only 21% of the population with age between 18 and 24…

Abstract

Enrollment in higher education in Brazil has been steadily growing and has reached 7 million recently. However, still only 21% of the population with age between 18 and 24 attend a higher education course. In this paper, we analyze how family income and race (defined in Brazil by self-declared skin color) affect the equity of access to higher education.

Details

Mitigating Inequality: Higher Education Research, Policy, and Practice in an Era of Massification and Stratification
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-291-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

Qiang Lianqing

Describes the programme of reconstructing higher education which is currently under way in China. Outlines the history of formal education in China from the beginning of…

1966

Abstract

Describes the programme of reconstructing higher education which is currently under way in China. Outlines the history of formal education in China from the beginning of the twentieth century and explains the national system of administration of higher education. Sets out ten major aspects in which Chinese higher education has to be reformed in order to meet the demands of the twenty‐first century

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1979

TOM GORE

Higher education demands considerable expenditure. In 1976–77 the recurrent expenditure alone in Great Britain was roughly £1 336 millions, which included maintenance…

Abstract

Higher education demands considerable expenditure. In 1976–77 the recurrent expenditure alone in Great Britain was roughly £1 336 millions, which included maintenance grants of £362 millions to students pursuing advanced courses in the institutions concerned with them. The expenditure represents about 18 per cent of all recurrent expenditure in 1976–77 by the Department of Education and Science, the Scottish Education Department and the Welsh Office. Capital expenditure on higher education in 1976–77 was around £154 millions. These large sums of expenditure are basically determined by the size of the eighteen year old age group and those in this group who qualify for higher education by acquiring the required ‘A’ levels and who wish to pursue it. The age participation rate (APR) is crucial to any analysis of future developments.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

Innara Lyapina, Elena Sotnikova, Olga Lebedeva, Tatyana Makarova and Nataliya Skvortsova

The system of higher education is ineffective – it has to change the concept of educational process, which is peculiar for increase of the volume of education of labor…

1361

Abstract

Purpose

The system of higher education is ineffective – it has to change the concept of educational process, which is peculiar for increase of the volume of education of labor resources. According to this, there is a necessity to pass to the system of higher education with elements of smart technologies. The purpose of this paper is to determine the role of smart technologies as an innovational and intellectual tool in development of the system of higher education and formation of actual skills with students.

Design/methodology/approach

The aspects of classical education in universities with elements of remote forms of implementation of smart technologies on IT platforms are studied; peculiarities of smart technology as intellectual tools of higher education are analyzed; perspectives of usage of smart technologies as innovational tools for development of higher education are determined. The research methods include analysis, synthesis, abstraction, comparison and logical method.

Findings

Information technologies become an inseparable part of life of society and human. A new network generation of people that cannot imagine life without new technological devices is growing. However, despite this, modern education does not sufficiently influence the development of human capital in the conditions of digital environment.

Originality/value

Scientific novelty consists in conducting the research in the sphere of significance and perspectives of implementing smart technologies into the systems of higher education of the Russian Federation. This paper could be interesting for public officers who form the program of development of higher education and academic staff of higher educational establishments.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 13 September 2022

Kevin Kester, Mary Abura, Chaewon Sohn and Ella Rho

This comparative case study looks towards the diverse approaches of higher education to support peacebuilding, from policy and philosophy to pedagogical practices, in…

Abstract

Purpose

This comparative case study looks towards the diverse approaches of higher education to support peacebuilding, from policy and philosophy to pedagogical practices, in conflict-affected and post-conflict settings. The achievement of global development goals is dependent on addressing access to quality education in conflict-affected contexts, including higher education. However, in settings affected by conflict, higher education is often perceived to be a luxury, not a necessity. This study, then, explores whether and how higher education might support peace and development through the unique perspective of the “three faces” of higher education in conflict contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is designed as a qualitative comparative case study. The research examines the work of university educators in two institutions in Afghanistan and Somaliland, highlighting the challenges and opportunities they face working in conflict-affected societies and their pedagogical responses to conflict. Data for the research were collected through in-depth interviews, documents, and digital artifacts with 12 university educators across the two institutions. The faculty teach a wide variety of subjects in the social sciences and humanities, subjects including and in addition to those specific to peace and development studies. To strengthen the interpretation of data, multiple coders were involved and intercoder reliability was conducted.

Findings

Findings indicate a number of challenges and opportunities that university lecturers and their institutions face in teaching for peace in conflict-affected contexts, particularly as it relates to the “three faces” of higher education to support, impede, or reveal the complicated nuances of peacebuilding in conflict settings. Member-checking was employed with participants to enhance the reliability of the analysis.

Originality/value

In the end, the paper contributes new empirical insights into higher education in conflict-affected contexts, particularly from the standpoint of faculty. Critical perspectives and implications for curriculum, pedagogy and research are offered.

Details

International Journal of Comparative Education and Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2396-7404

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 176000