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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

John Elliott and Nick Johns

Examines the impact of trends and fashions on international leisureresort design. Two types of trend are identified: the changing behaviourand attitudes of “tourists” and…

Abstract

Examines the impact of trends and fashions on international leisure resort design. Two types of trend are identified: the changing behaviour and attitudes of “tourists” and the forces of fashion, which also influence architectural design. Discusses various travel and leisure trends and examines their impact on leisure resorts through international examples. The pattern of present and future developments may be resolved into a relatively small number of emerging resort styles which are expected to gain increasing importance through the 1990s.

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International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2008

Melih Madanoglu and Sherie Brezina

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate financial benefits of spa operations in resorts by developing a spa revenue contribution technique/method.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate financial benefits of spa operations in resorts by developing a spa revenue contribution technique/method.

Design/methodology/approach

This purpose is achieved by utilizing current industry and academic literature in the fields of hospitality and resort management.

Findings

The results show that a hypothetical resort with 300 rooms would achieve a spa revenue per occupied room of $40.08 which translates into additional annual revenue of more than $3,500,000.

Practical implications

One of the implications of this study is that a well‐run spa may contribute approximately US$28 per available room. Another practical implication is that spas are important generators of additional revenue as they may contribute, at times, over 20 percent to room revenue by using considerably less space than resort/hotel rooms do.

Originality/value

This paper derives its value from developing a specific technique to support the common notion that a well‐operated spa makes a significant contribution to resort revenues.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2016

Perunjodi Naidoo and Prabha Ramseook-Munhurrun

Destination and resort managers have little knowledge regarding the Chinese outbound tourist market, yet its enormous potential cannot be overlooked. Providing services to…

Abstract

Destination and resort managers have little knowledge regarding the Chinese outbound tourist market, yet its enormous potential cannot be overlooked. Providing services to this often unfamiliar segment can be difficult and may result in poor service delivery which can be detrimental to both enclave resorts and small island destinations, such as Mauritius. This study uses in-depth interviews among key informants from three- to five-star enclave resorts targeting Chinese tourists. The main challenges experienced by the resorts are cultural behavior, language barriers, different food habits, and the need to improve the service facilities and experience. Based on insights from industry practitioners, the study identifies service modifications provided by enclave resorts to provide Chinese tourists with a positive experience.

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The World Meets Asian Tourists
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-219-1

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Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2021

Soniya Billore and Yasushi Maruyama

Cultural consumption is the study of the motivation for the consumption of, and experiences related to factors such as lifestyle, soft skills, landscapes, traditions…

Abstract

Cultural consumption is the study of the motivation for the consumption of, and experiences related to factors such as lifestyle, soft skills, landscapes, traditions, professions, history and nature etc. Innovative approaches in experiential marketing such as customization, service diversification and cultural assimilation for strengthening customer relationships are recommended strategic approaches for supporting business growth and development. In recent times the pandemic situation in Japan resulted in a 93% decline in inbound tourism (JNTO, 2020). To support customer trust and relationship Japanese resorts such as Onsens and Ryokans embarked on innovative experiential marketing strategies to continue customer relationship while also dealing with the official prescribed restrictions for preventing the spread of infection. This chapter explores the innovative experiential marketing adopted by Japanese resorts and contributes to the identified need for more knowledge in the area. A multiple case approach was adopted and information from 12 resorts was obtained through secondary data. Results identify five innovative marketing approaches that were used by the Japanese resorts studied in this research. The chapter contributes theoretically in relating cultural consumption to experiential marketing in COVID-19 times, opens discussion for policy implications and aims to provide some inspiration to other firms in the business of tourism related to cultural consumption.

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2020

Marketa Kubickova and Rebecca Neal

This study aims to provide a deeper look into why luxury resorts engage in the H-2B visa program and the opportunities and challenges from the human resources employee…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide a deeper look into why luxury resorts engage in the H-2B visa program and the opportunities and challenges from the human resources employee perspective. Adequate staffing is a well-documented challenge for luxury resorts due to their location, seasonality and access to qualified labor. Many resorts turn to the H-2B non-immigrant visa to mitigate the issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This study consists of in-depth interviews with human resource employees. An additional survey centering on descriptive statistics, the level of engagement, cost and experience with H-2B visa programs was collected.

Findings

The findings of this study provide a deeper understanding why luxury resorts use H-2B employees in their operations. The results shed a deeper light on issues centering around the H-2B visa process, its uncertainty, cost and complexity.

Practical implications

Temporary H-2B workers are essential to the success of resort operation. Collaboration between the resort management and government agencies is essential as strategic solutions must be implemented. Resorts must explore diversified recruitment opportunities and the use of technology while keeping human labor in the center of its core operation.

Originality/value

The first exploratory study providing a deeper look into the many challenges’ luxury resorts face when using the H-2B visa program from the human resources employee perspective. A call for change is being made as the respondents established the need for H-2B workers, however, the system in place makes it difficult to obtain such employees and to continue resort operations.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2019

Ali Najeeb and Mary Barrett

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how resort managers respond to employment legislation (Law No. 02/2008).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how resort managers respond to employment legislation (Law No. 02/2008).

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative case study data from seven self-contained tourist resorts in the Maldives were used to investigate the managerial responses to employment legislation.

Findings

Resort managers’ responses ranged from passive compliance to active resistance, with decoupling through opportunism as the dominant strategy used to circumvent the legislation. Some human resource management (HRM) practices emerged from resort managers’ interactions with external stakeholders and employees. Strategic responses and HRM practices were driven by a search for legitimacy or efficiency and sometimes both. The findings show that there are differences between strategic responses and HRM practices by organisational subfield, local resorts and international hotel chains. The resorts’ market orientation also influenced resort managers’ responses and HRM practices.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this paper have limitations because it was limited to a single industry/sector and to a particular piece of legislation. However, it demonstrates the complexity of the relationship between institutional context and HRM.

Originality/value

This paper shows that responding to employment legislation entails a high level of interplay between the institutional environment and HR actors, and between stakeholders (e.g. employees) and HR actors. It demonstrates the difficulty of reconciling institutional requirements with the preferences of different stakeholders and organisational interests. HR actors actively make sense of institutional requirements and modify HRM practices to accommodate stakeholders’ varying perspectives and preferences. This suggests that in countries such as the Maldives, uneven institutional coverage (e.g. incomplete employment legislation) allows room for organisations to innovate – for better or worse.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Marcello Joly and Elena Irina Ungureanu

This paper aims to examine the impact of global warming and climate change on skiing by assessing the costs that ski resorts would have to bear to address the lack of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the impact of global warming and climate change on skiing by assessing the costs that ski resorts would have to bear to address the lack of snow. In this way, new development models can be hypothesized for the regional economy in the Aosta Valley, territory located in the West Alps, whose economy is largely based on winter tourism.

Design/methodology/approach

Starting with a literature review regarding global warming and its effects on the Alps, a methodology of analysis has been implemented to assess the relative weaknesses of ski resorts. Additional costs in adaptation strategies have been considered in the light of a major choice ski resorts must face: investing or not. For this analysis, four scenarios of global warming have been taken into consideration.

Findings

The lack of snow due to a rise in temperatures will have a big impact on regional ski resorts and will seriously threaten the economy of small lateral valleys. In this scenario, it is important to think about reorganizing the regional ski supply by focusing on stations with better economic results and those strategically well located. In this way, we can safeguard winter tourism in the region and preserve skiing by concentrating costs only in those resorts that are also able to bear new cost adaptation strategies.

Originality/value

The value of this paper is its estimation of the future impact of a rise in the average temperature in regional ski resorts. This impact is assessed in relation to concerns about the reduction of the skiing area and the new costs that ski companies will need to bear. The paper also proposes a new model for the reorganization of the ski supply in the Aosta Valley.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2013

Ali Najeeb

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of human resource (HR) actors in the design and implementation of HR practices. More specifically, the paper explores…

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5472

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of human resource (HR) actors in the design and implementation of HR practices. More specifically, the paper explores how interactions between various HR actors influence the design and implementation of HR practices in tourist resorts in the Maldives.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative, multiple case study approach was used. Data for this study were collected in seven tourist resorts in the Maldives through 49 semi-structured interviews conducted with managers with different functional roles, at various levels in the organisational hierarchy and with non-managerial employees. Field observations and a range of secondary sources supplemented the interview data.

Findings

The findings show that all HR actors influence the design and implementation of human resource management (HRM) practices in these resorts to some degree, although the extent of their involvement varies from actor to actor. Execution of HR practices necessitates interaction among HR actors as they contest and reconcile their interests and roles. High levels of social capital enhance the roles of HR actors as they overcome constraints to the implementation of HRM practices.

Research limitations/implications

This study is a qualitative and exploratory study. Data are clustered at the sub-unit level and limited to a single industry. This presents limitations in generalising the findings. A more extensive study covering other industries is necessary to explore different configurations of the negotiated relationships among HR actors.

Practical implications

This study identifies various management strategies that could be used to enhance HR actors’ social capital. These strategies could be useful for managers in other organisational settings

Originality/value

There is a dearth of literature on the interactions between managers at different levels in organisational hierarchies and with different functional roles, and how these interactions affect the design and implementation of HRM practices in organisations. Using social capital theory, this research explores the interaction between HR actors in the design and implementation of HRM in the context of self-contained resorts in the Maldives, thereby shedding light on a context that has attracted little research to date.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2012

Dylan J. Esson

The purpose of this paper is to describe the growth of the early ski market and the marketing strategies that the Union Pacific Railroad took in promoting Sun Valley ski…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the growth of the early ski market and the marketing strategies that the Union Pacific Railroad took in promoting Sun Valley ski resort, one of the most popular early destination ski resorts in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses primary and secondary source material, including ski periodicals, national magazines and the manuscript collection of W. Averell Harriman, the Chairman of the Union Pacific Railroad during the creation of Sun Valley.

Findings

This paper finds that Sun Valley pioneered the western ski vacation by conducting careful market research into not only the snow and weather conditions of western mountains, but also into the habits and economic potential of skiers and winter tourists.

Originality/value

Scholarly work on skiing has primarily looked at the sport from the social and cultural perspective of skiers. Work on entrepreneurial objectives of ski resort designers has largely focused on the period after the Second World War. This is among the first works to analyze entrepreneurial activities and marketing strategies in the ski industry before the Second World War. As a result, the paper challenges the idea that big business only began to shape the ski industry during the Cold War. Instead, this paper shows that large corporations like the Union Pacific Railroad were influential in growing the ski market by building resorts that illustrated the importance of market segmentation to the success of ski areas. In this way, the paper challenges the popular idea that Sun Valley was merely a media sensation and shows that it was a carefully designed business that exhibited a nuanced approach to changes in the ski market.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Patricia Nemetz and Wendy Eager

Marketing at ski resorts presents an interesting challenge because of the variety of resort types associated with the industry. At one end of the marketing spectrum are…

Abstract

Marketing at ski resorts presents an interesting challenge because of the variety of resort types associated with the industry. At one end of the marketing spectrum are the so‐called destination resorts that trade on an image of glitz and glamour. Much of the marketing talent needed to run such resorts is to be found in large corporate departments that promote everything from upscale real estate to televised events studded with celebrities. At the other end of the spectrum are small local resorts, often owned by entrepreneurs, whose marketing activities are for the most part limited to finding the right marketing mix for the sport itself. In contrast to the myriad of activities associated with larger facilities, smaller resorts tend to focus more on product, price, promotion, and place. An interesting problem develops when smaller resorts seek to leapfrog their current market position by expanding their size. This case study examines the 49° North Mountain Resort, a small, privately owned skiing facility in Washington state that is seeking to expand. Before investing in expansion activities, entrepreneurs must carry out an accurate assessment of market potential and financial risk – by no means an easy task. One possible technique for ascertaining risk is to link a forecasted growth in revenues to improvements in facilities and operations. An entrepeneur with some prior access to a history of market behavior clearly has an advantage over those with only a limited sense of how a radically new product or service is likely to perform. The present study provides data that should prove useful to anyone attempting to judge whether an expansion is desirable. It also describes the marketing mix that has brought some stability to the resort’s financial performance. Market and quantitative data are available for analysis, but are other factors important as well? Should the resort maintain its current marketing mix, or should it target a more lucrative market?

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

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