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Tech Development through HRM
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-312-0

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Book part
Publication date: 18 August 2006

Miriam Erez

This chapter discusses the strengths and challenges posed by the chapter by Aumann and Ostroff entitled, “Multi-Level Fit: An Integrative Framework for Understanding HRM…

Abstract

This chapter discusses the strengths and challenges posed by the chapter by Aumann and Ostroff entitled, “Multi-Level Fit: An Integrative Framework for Understanding HRM Practices in Cross-Cultural Contexts.” In addition, this chapter proposes an alternative multi-level model of culture, which consists of structural and dynamic dimensions with culture's strength as a moderator of the top-down bottom-up dynamic processes. This model assumes that there is a fit between the value system and the HRM practices, as they represent two layers of culture – visible and less visible. Yet, the fit can be interrupted when HRM practices are transferred across cultures. The chapter further discusses when HRM practices are rejected and when they are accepted despite the misfit.

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Multi-Level Issues in Social Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-432-4

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Book part
Publication date: 29 November 2019

Dean Testa, Johel Brown-Grant and Denise Bedford

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Assessment Strategies for Knowledge Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-610-0

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2021

Gullu Gencer, Hakan Atay, Arzu Gurdogan and Ulker Colakoglu

This study aims to measure the effect of organizational culture perceptions of hotel employees on their organizational silence behavior and job performance, as well as the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to measure the effect of organizational culture perceptions of hotel employees on their organizational silence behavior and job performance, as well as the effect of their organizational silence behavior on their job performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A correlational survey model was used in this research and a questionnaire was distributed to collect the data from 389 sampled employees working in four- and five-star hotels in the Kusadasi region in Turkey.

Findings

It was found that organizational culture was not significantly related to organizational silence but that organizational culture and its dimensions were significantly related to job performance. It was also revealed that while organizational silence was not significantly related to job performance, its dimensions were significantly related to job performance.

Practical implications

The results of this study provide insight into organizational culture as an important factor in increasing job performance. The study also revealed how organizational silence behavior and its dimensions affect job performance. In this sense, accommodation establishments will be able to acquire new perspectives in terms of improving job performance.

Originality/value

This paper is deemed important, as it examined these three terms in one model in the field of tourism management. It is thought that it will contribute to the literature by closing the gap in the tourism literature while leading the way for future studies.

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Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

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Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Chenchen Li, Ling Eleanor Zhang and Anne-Wil Harzing

In response to the somewhat paradoxical combination of increasing diversity in the global workforce and the resurgence of nationalism in an era of global mobility, this…

Abstract

In response to the somewhat paradoxical combination of increasing diversity in the global workforce and the resurgence of nationalism in an era of global mobility, this chapter aims to uncover how employees on international assignments respond to exposure to new cultures. Specifically, the study aims to explicate the underlying psychological mechanisms linking expatriates' monocultural, multicultural, global, and cosmopolitan identity negotiation strategies with their responses toward the host culture by drawing upon exclusionary and integrative reactions theory in cross-cultural psychology. This conceptual chapter draws on the perspective of exclusionary versus integrative reactions toward foreign cultures – a perspective rooted in cross-cultural psychology research – to categorize expatriates' responses toward the host culture. More specifically, the study elaborates how two primary activators of expatriates' responses toward the host culture – the salience of home-culture identity and a cultural learning mindset – explain the relationship between cultural identity negotiation strategies and expatriates' exclusionary and integrative responses. The following metaphors for these different types of cultural identity negotiation strategies are introduced: “ostrich” (monocultural strategy), “frog” (multicultural strategy), “bird” (global strategy), and “lizard” (cosmopolitan strategy). The proposed dynamic framework of cultural identity negotiation strategies illustrates the sophisticated nature of expatriates' responses to new cultures. This chapter also emphasizes that cross-cultural training tempering expatriates' exclusionary reactions and encouraging integrative reactions is crucial for more effective expatriation in a multicultural work environment.

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Intercultural Management in Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-827-0

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Book part
Publication date: 18 July 2007

Marina Nuciari

In this research the starting point was that a certain gap between military and civilian culture could exist, because of the inevitable difference between typical military…

Abstract

In this research the starting point was that a certain gap between military and civilian culture could exist, because of the inevitable difference between typical military values and new values arisen in contemporary societies, with special reference to Western affluent societies. It seems that this hypothesis belong to the culture-free side, since it rests on the concept of a military culture made of specific values, which are the same in every society. There is anyway a different viewpoint, following the trends of studies developed in the intercultural relations domain, mainly dealing with business internationalisation and cross-cultural management topics, generally known as the culture-bound thesis. In the culture-free assumption the consequence should be a pressure of social change on a supposed unique military; in the culture-bound conception a mutual and systemic adaptation of different institutions within each inclusive society driven by one's own culture could be expected. Findings in this research show that if a relative gap can be observed between military and civilian students, this varies greatly according to different groups of countries. Distances seem to be larger in countries belonging to the post-modern cluster (Sweden, Switzerland, Spain, France, Italy, the Netherlands), and lowering down in modern countries such as Slovenia, Bulgaria and Poland, and even less appreciable in Romania, South Africa and Turkey. This could give some support to the culture-free thesis, according to which military culture is specific and find more convergences with so-called traditional societies than with modern or post-modern cultures. But results are not as sharp as needed, and the culture-bound thesis cannot anyway be rejected.

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Cultural Differences between the Military and Parent Society in Democratic Countries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-444-53024-0

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2021

Walead Etri

This qualitative research set out to understand what teachers’ assessments were of the context of teaching as it relates to the curriculum, and what they consider…

Abstract

Purpose

This qualitative research set out to understand what teachers’ assessments were of the context of teaching as it relates to the curriculum, and what they consider appropriate for an optimal teaching and learning experience in a university english language teaching (ELT) context.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data were deemed required to understand the effects and understanding teachers had of the ELT curriculum as it played out in their teaching context. Focus group interviews and observations were the main method for data generation.

Findings

The context has a bearing on the ongoing development of teachers’ intercultural sensitivity (IS) frames and how they address IS over time in their context of teaching as it pertains to curriculum.

Originality/value

This is an original research paper which gives insight to knowledge about the relationship between ELT, curriculum and culture.

Details

Higher Education Evaluation and Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-5789

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2021

John E. Mello and Hilary Schloemer

This interdisciplinary investigation examines the topics of organizational climate and subcultures, which have received scant attention in the supply chain literature…

Abstract

Purpose

This interdisciplinary investigation examines the topics of organizational climate and subcultures, which have received scant attention in the supply chain literature, highlighting the potential importance of these social dynamics to supply chain management phenomena.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a single-organization revelatory case study design, qualitatively analyzing coded interviews and observations of participants.

Findings

The authors’ findings indicate that a firm's organizational climate can contribute to the formation and strengthening of a subculture and that the subculture may desire to insert their own values and norms concerning supply chain management which could run counter to those of the overall company.

Research limitations/implications

The authors theorize about the conditions under which strong subcultures emerge and that they may exert outsized influence on the way a company approaches supply chain management activities. Accounting for such influence may unearth important social dynamics occurring within supply chain phenomena that will better help researchers understand behavior and outcomes within that phenomenon.

Practical implications

Managers should be aware of the potential for subgroups to form strong subcultures and that subcultures may influence the way supply chain activities are performed. Climate dynamics can also affect employee perceptions and behaviors, and managers should monitor these dynamics and adapt their policies and messaging accordingly.

Originality/value

This study examines a phenomenon that has previously been underexamined in the supply chain management literature–the influence of culture and climate on subcultures and their subcultures' subsequent impact on how companies perform supply chain management activities.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2021

Gunnar Jürgen Lühr, Marian Bosch-Rekveldt and Mladen Radujković

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the Last-Planner-System’s impact on project cultures in terms of partnering.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the Last-Planner-System’s impact on project cultures in terms of partnering.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study was performed using multiple data gathering approaches. The project cultures of three projects not applying the Last-Planner-System were compared with three projects that apply the Last-Planner-System. In total, 30 participants were involved in the study. Semi-structured interviews were held and analysed by applying qualitative content analysis. Also, the “organizational culture assessment instrument”, which belongs to the “competing values framework”, was used by means of an online survey.

Findings

The Last-Planner-System leads to increased levels of mutual understanding and control about the tasks and issues of the other parties. This detailed overview leads towards a more distinguished evaluation of the trustworthiness of individuals. This does not necessarily lead to a partnering project culture.

Originality/value

The contribution to research is that higher levels of transparency and mutual understanding do not necessarily lead to a high level of trust. Rather, transparency could be seen as a controlling mechanism that leads to better-founded estimations about the trustworthiness of others in the project.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2021

Aluisius Hery Pratono

This study aims to understand the culture of excellence by examining the role of entrepreneurial culture in shaping how firms achieve sustainable competitive advantage…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to understand the culture of excellence by examining the role of entrepreneurial culture in shaping how firms achieve sustainable competitive advantage (CA). This study takes into consideration the firms’ capability to transform the entrepreneurial culture into a sustainable CA by generating product development and adapting the information technological turbulence.

Design/methodology/approach

This study first gathers evidence from literature then carries out a detailed study to propose a structural equation model followed by an online survey that supports empirical evidence. This empirical test involves a data set with 782 usable responses following the 4,000 emails sent to the respondents and removed data due to the missing values. The population data are taken from the firm directory in Surabaya City that the Indonesian Ministry of Trade and Industry published.

Findings

There is a strong tendency that entrepreneurial culture is imperative for firms to attain sustainable CA by supporting new product development. The results show that product development provides a partial mediating effect, which indicates that entrepreneurial culture may affect the sustainable CA directly and with the product development support. This study also touches on dynamic capability by proposing a scenario approach that suggests that firms should refine the entrepreneurial culture to adapt to the information technological turbulence.

Originality/value

This study extends the understanding of the culture of excellence by underpinning the dynamic capability theory, which argues that entrepreneurial culture is a valuable resource, which helps firms achieve sustainable CA by promoting product development.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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