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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2021

Rahul Saxena, Sanjeev Kishore and Vandana Srivastava

The paper attempts to frame the challenge of managing the transition to a sustainable economy by way of a conceptual model consisting of a zero-footprint regulatory regime and a…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper attempts to frame the challenge of managing the transition to a sustainable economy by way of a conceptual model consisting of a zero-footprint regulatory regime and a sustainability fund.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model of the sustainable industrial revolution has been developed based on the learnings from industries such as originators (mining), farming, pharmaceuticals, pesticides and chemicals and long-lasting artefacts against an overall perspective.

Findings

It is suggested to have an institutional structural mechanism in place to ensure that footprint is minimized through recycling including refurbishing, resale or transformation. This includes management of recycling businesses through execution of a zero-waste regulatory regime that will build and use a sustainability fund.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of the paper are arising out of the topic being an issue of gigantic proportions with immense complexity. An attempt has been made to bring out the inescapability and the imperative of a sustainable industrial revolution.

Practical implications

This paper presents practical aspects such as collusion between trash and recycling businesses, land use and social aspects of criticality of public support. If implemented, the suggested model can make a paradigm shift in the way firms, industry and governments can handle the challenge of sustainability.

Originality/value

The value of this conceptual paper lies in an attempt to extend the learning organization framework to the concept of a regulatory model for sustainability that is not limited to the definition of a firm but stands extended to industries and to the economics, land use and demographics of the planet.

Details

Technological Sustainability, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2754-1312

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Mridula Dwivedi, Rahul Varman and Kaushal K. Saxena

Small firm clusters are noted for their success across the globe. Inter‐firm cooperation and trust is said to be central to their success. But past research has restricted itself…

Abstract

Small firm clusters are noted for their success across the globe. Inter‐firm cooperation and trust is said to be central to their success. But past research has restricted itself to ‘culture’ based explanations for cooperation and trust, that is, characteristic based trust. Doubts have been cast by a few studies about characteristic alone being a rationale for trust. In this paper, using the existing classification of trust and based on qualitative data from secondary literature on small firm clusters; we have argued for existence of more generalized bases of trust, namely knowledge and institutions, which develop through interaction among parties and can possibly lead to trust and cooperation in small firm clusters.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

Case study
Publication date: 27 September 2018

Deepak Pandit, Shalini Rahul Tiwari and Arun Sahay

This case is most suited for the course on Strategic Management.

Abstract

Subject area

This case is most suited for the course on Strategic Management.

Study level/applicability

The case can be used for post graduate management students and executive education participants. It should be used in the section dealing with capabilities of an organization.

Case overview

Sonalika Group, situated in Punjab, India, started its operations in 1969 by manufacturing agricultural implements and equipment’s. By 1990, the firm graduated into manufacturing tractors. It gradually expanded its wings in countries like Nigeria, Argentina and Brazil and became the third largest tractor manufacturer of India in FY 2012. The year 2005 was a landmark year when it entered the passenger vehicle segment through its subsidiary International Cars and Motors Limited that launched a multi-utility vehicle (MUV) named Rhino. The vehicle was expected to fill up the vacant spot created by the withdrawal of “Qualis”, which was a highly popular MUV manufactured by Toyota. However, the enthusiasm of launching Rhino waned with time because its sales did not pick up as expected. After selling around 5,000 units of Rhino, the company stopped its production as the product had started showing up teething problems. The marketers and designers burnt midnight oil to bring out an improved version of Rhino. This version was christened “Extreme” and launched in 2012. Despite all marketing, sales and service efforts, “Extreme” also failed to take off. The group is wondering when it was so successful in tractors why it has not been successful in passenger vehicle category. It has to work out a strategy to be successful in passenger vehicle segment as well.

Expected learning outcomes

Expected learning outcomes are as follows: to analyse the external and internal environment for a business and understand its impact on business decision-making; to understand the relationship between operational capabilities and dynamic capabilities; to identify opportunities and match it with internal capabilities; to analyse the reasons for product failure and identify remedial measures; to understand the process of technology diffusion and thereby strategic planning.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject Code:

CSS 11: Strategy

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 June 2020

Nataraj Poomathi, Sunpreet Singh, Chander Prakash, Arjun Subramanian, Rahul Sahay, Amutha Cinappan and Seeram Ramakrishna

In the past decade, three-dimensional (3D) printing has gained attention in areas such as medicine, engineering, manufacturing art and most recently in education. In biomedical…

1364

Abstract

Purpose

In the past decade, three-dimensional (3D) printing has gained attention in areas such as medicine, engineering, manufacturing art and most recently in education. In biomedical, the development of a wide range of biomaterials has catalysed the considerable role of 3D printing (3DP), where it functions as synthetic frameworks in the form of scaffolds, constructs or matrices. The purpose of this paper is to present the state-of-the-art literature coverage of 3DP applications in tissue engineering (such as customized scaffoldings and organs, and regenerative medicine).

Design/methodology/approach

This review focusses on various 3DP techniques and biomaterials for tissue engineering (TE) applications. The literature reviewed in the manuscript has been collected from various journal search engines including Google Scholar, Research Gate, Academia, PubMed, Scopus, EMBASE, Cochrane Library and Web of Science. The keywords that have been selected for the searches were 3 D printing, tissue engineering, scaffoldings, organs, regenerative medicine, biomaterials, standards, applications and future directions. Further, the sub-classifications of the keyword, wherever possible, have been used as sectioned/sub-sectioned in the manuscript.

Findings

3DP techniques have many applications in biomedical and TE (B-TE), as covered in the literature. Customized structures for B-TE applications are easy and cost-effective to manufacture through 3DP, whereas on many occasions, conventional technologies generally become incompatible. For this, this new class of manufacturing must be explored to further capabilities for many potential applications.

Originality/value

This review paper presents a comprehensive study of the various types of 3DP technologies in the light of their possible B-TE application as well as provides a future roadmap.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 February 2023

Manisha Saxena and Dharmesh K. Mishra

Employee engagement (EE) can result in multiple positive impacts not only on the individual and his/her team but also on the organisational and financial outcome of the business…

Abstract

Purpose

Employee engagement (EE) can result in multiple positive impacts not only on the individual and his/her team but also on the organisational and financial outcome of the business. If artificial intelligence (AI) can be used as a tool to facilitate EE, organisations will be more than satisfied to adopt it. The paper aims to study the penetration of AI for EE in corporate India.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the information gathered through secondary research, a framework of questions was built and sent to some senior people in the area of AI and HR to check for its completeness. Respondents based on inclusion criteria were selected through random purposive sampling to be a part of the study. A total of 23 respondents participated in the study. Qualitative data analysis of the transcripts was conducted using MAXQDA 2022 (Verbi Software, Berlin, Germany), which is a qualitative data analysis software. Multiple readings were undertaken to identify the patterns and relationships in the data.

Findings

The participants described a variety of issues while using or planning to use AI for EE. Some of the issues mentioned were related to cost, challenges, mindsets and attitudes, demography of employees, comfort in the use of technology, size of the organisation, change management strategies, software vendors and vendor support. The most common responses were grouped into headings such as Organisation, Process, Employee and Software Choice Related aspects.

Originality/value

Lately, the overall work environment, work and personal life balance, and quality of life have become more desirable than earning a good salary. AI is becoming a part of various aspects of business but its role in HR is yet to be explored. AI’s capabilities to predict may result in more employee work satisfaction. The paper explores the possibility of using AI as a tool in every aspect of employee life cycle, thereby attempting to make HR processes more productive and enhance EE.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Sherva Elizabeth Cooray, Sab Bhaumik, Ashok Roy, John Devapriam, Rahul Rai and Regi Alexander

The 11th revision of the International Classification of diseases which sets global standards for defining, reporting and managing health conditions is under way. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The 11th revision of the International Classification of diseases which sets global standards for defining, reporting and managing health conditions is under way. The International Classification of Diseases (ICD) underpinning principle of clinical utility is currently poor for persons with Disorders of Intellectual Development (DID) and mental disorders. This impedes access to healthcare resources; services and social inclusion thereby further aggravating their vulnerability. The purpose of this paper is to present a critical overview and evidence informed recommendations within the context of an international collaborative programme, undertaken by the Faculty of Psychiatry of Intellectual Disability, Royal College of Psychiatrists, UK with support from the World Health Organisation (WHO).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors carried out: first, a systematic review (SR) of literature, using PRISMA guidelines regarding the reliability, validity and utility of the ICD-10/Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) diagnostic criteria in people with DID (PWDID); second, a national and international consultation exercise with partners, stakeholders and experts; third, a multicentric survey of problem behaviours in PWDID; and finally, information dissemination/dialogues including presentations and workshops at key scientific events, consultation networking, data gathering and consensus building.

Findings

The SR revealed a dearth of robust studies – most consisting of weak research methodologies. Significant difficulties were highlighted regarding the application of diagnostic criteria in the current classificatory systems – particularly in people with severe/moderate DID. Recommendations supported the introduction WHERE APPROPRIATE of modifications based on observed phenomena (signs) in PWDID in lieu of reported symptoms to facilitate DIAGNOSIS AND better access to healthcare and the community. Heterogeneity precluded quantitative pooling and meta-analysis. The consensus building exercise globally revealed that problem behaviours were the commonest reasons for referral to healthcare services with significant numbers without a diagnosed mental disorder being prescribed psychoactive medication.

Research limitations/implications

The consensus gathering exercise WAS SELECTIVE AND did not cover all of the 194 member states of WHO due to resource and time constraints and this constitutes the main limitation of our study. Based on the SR and expert consensus, the authors submitted evidence informed pragmatic proposals to the WHO aimed at addressing the shortcomings of the ICD-10. The key recommendations focused on improving clinical utility within the context of epistemic iteration which would consolidate and strengthen the future evidence base. It was also recommended that self-injurious behaviour should form a standalone sub category in view of its relevance for healthcare services and resources which underpin clinical utility.

Practical implications

The ICD-11 is a global, multidisciplinary and multilingual development for public health benefit with 70 per cent of the world's health expenditures assigned using this system for resource allocation. Currently mental disorders in PWDID can be misinterpreted, unrecognised and under reported resulting in barriers to access to treatment and healthcare resources. Conversely disorders may be over diagnosed when the inherent discrepancies between the chronological age and the developmental level of functioning are not considered. Conclusions and recommendations from this study will result in better diagnosis of mental disorders and healthcare resources in this population.

Social implications

PWDID are a vulnerable sector of the population with an increased prevalence of mental health problems who are marginalised and discriminated by society. Early detection, treatment and management of these conditions will prevent further decompensation and stigmatisation.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors knowledge this is the first comprehensive, large-scale study which evaluates the ICD classificatory system within the context of clinical utility for PWDID, including experts and stakeholders from both lower/middle- and high-income countries. The international consultation/consensus building process culminating in the formulation of evidence informed recommendations, aimed at improving the clinical utility of the ICD-11 for this population, has the potential to improve access to appropriate healthcare and treatment and consequent enhancement of their quality of life.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2020

Pundalik Pandharinath Mali, Nilesh S. Pawar, Narendra S. Sonawane, Vikas Patil and Rahul Patil

The purpose of this work was to develop a new trispiperazido phosphate-based reactive diluent (diphosphate-piperazine hydroxyl acrylate [DPHA]) and used as a flame retardant with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this work was to develop a new trispiperazido phosphate-based reactive diluent (diphosphate-piperazine hydroxyl acrylate [DPHA]) and used as a flame retardant with an epoxy acrylate (EA) in ultraviolet (UV)-curable wood coating.

Design/methodology/approach

The concentration of reactive diluent was varied from 0% to 20% in the UV-curable formulation with constant photoinitiator concentration. The effect of DPHA concentration on film properties was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis, gel content, water absorption and limiting oxygen index.

Findings

The results showed that the viscosity of the prepared formulation decreased by increasing reactive diluent (DPHA) concentration which leads to improving the coating efficiency. A high concentration of reactive diluent (DPHA) of the cured films shows good resistance against stain, mechanical and thermal properties, which results in an increased glass transition temperature (Tg) and cross-linking density of the films.

Originality/value

The new trispiperazido phosphate-based reactive diluent was used in wood coating formulation, which resulted in excellent flame-retardant properties with higher cross-linked density with good stain resistance. This material can provide a wide range of application for coating industries to produce a glossy finish.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 50 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 April 2021

Ganesh Rupchand Gawale and Naga Srinivasulu G.

Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine is an advanced combustion method to use alternate fuel with higher fuel economy and, reduce NOX and soot emissions. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine is an advanced combustion method to use alternate fuel with higher fuel economy and, reduce NOX and soot emissions. This paper aims to investigate the influence of ethanol fraction (ethanol plus gasoline) on dual fuel HCCI engine performance.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, the existing CI engine is modified into dual fuel HCCI engine by attaching the carburetor to the inlet manifold for the supply of ethanol blend (E40/E60/E80/E100). The mixture of ethanol blend and the air is ignited by diesel through a fuel injector into the combustion chamber at the end of the compression stroke. The experiments are conducted for high load conditions on the engine i.e. 2.8 kW and 3.5 kW maximum output power for 1,500 constant rpm.

Findings

It is noticed from the experimental results that, with an increase of ethanol in the blends, ignition delay (ID) increases and the start of combustion is retarded. It is noticed that E100 shows the highest ID and low in-cylinder pressure; however, E40 shows the lowest ID compared to higher fractions of ethanol blends. An increase in ethanol proportion reduces NOX and smoke opacity but, HC and CO emissions increase compared to pure diesel mode engine. E100 plus diesel dual-fuel HCCI engine shows the highest brake thermal efficiency compared to remaining ethanol blends and baseline diesel engine.

Originality/value

This experimental study concluded that E100 plus diesel and E80 plus diesel gave optimum dual fuel HCCI engine performance for 2.8 kW and 3.5 kW rated power, respectively.

Details

World Journal of Engineering, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1708-5284

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2011

Navin K. Dev, Rahul Caprihan and Sanjeev Swami

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the case of a manufacturing firm situated in an industrial city of India, focusing on supply chain management issues of the concerned…

1293

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the case of a manufacturing firm situated in an industrial city of India, focusing on supply chain management issues of the concerned organization from two operational perspectives: supply side (or the procurement side) and the distribution side of the system.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors first considered the outsourcing decision‐making problem in a static environment using analytical expression by means of a variable fraction of demand. Next, the authors extended the scope of this problem by considering outsourcing decisions in a dynamic environment, using the sequential decision‐making approach with various operational and inventory factors. Finally, the authors carried out the study of the distribution side of the supply chain of industry using discrete event simulation.

Findings

It was observed that, in the case study organization, because of the rather unstructured approach in dealing with the outsourcing perspective, the authors suggested the adoption of a more scientific approach in computation of fraction of demand to be outsourced. Further, since the distribution network typically experienced high inventory levels throughout the supply chain, it was decided upfront to optimize this performance measure.

Originality/value

The primary objectives of this exercise are to: address the operational concerns of a real‐life manufacturing environment; apply the theoretical models in a realistic environment, and compare the results of theory with practice; and provide actionable managerial recommendations.

Article
Publication date: 28 August 2007

Amit Prakash and Rahul De'

This paper aims to show that the meaning of development influencing the design of ICT for development (ICT4D) projects is important in deciding what purpose they will eventually…

2763

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to show that the meaning of development influencing the design of ICT for development (ICT4D) projects is important in deciding what purpose they will eventually serve.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a review of the literature on development and technology studies, the paper shows how different meanings of development guide technology usage and policy choice for land reforms. A case study of a land records computerization project in India is used to reinforce this claim.

Findings

By explaining alternative manifestations of interlinkages between development and technology, the paper demonstrates that the design choice, especially the content and service delivery model, for an ICT4D project gets influenced by the development context within which it is set.

Research limitations/implications

The focus of the paper has been restricted to a limited context of information and communication technology usage – to land reforms as a development objective, in a relatively better‐off province of India. Future research will include ICT4D projects in other domains and in different socio‐economic settings.

Practical implications

The findings will encourage ICT4D policy makers and project designers to broaden their perspectives of what constitutes development and explicitly acknowledge the importance of development contexts in influencing the outcomes of ICT4D projects.

Originality/value

Prior research in ICT4D has not looked explicitly at the influence of development contexts in informing technology design. The paper attempts to fill this gap by tracing design choices to the contexts of technology use created through alternative understanding of the objectives of development. This can be of help to researchers looking at issues of technology use for societal development and for policy makers and project designers entrusted with the choice of technology.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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