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1 – 10 of 528
Article
Publication date: 10 February 2021

Sreejith Alathur, Manaf Kottakkunnummal and Naganna Chetty

This study aims to analyse the nature and forms of digital content that may influence e-participation for persons with disabilities (PWDs) during a flood disaster.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyse the nature and forms of digital content that may influence e-participation for persons with disabilities (PWDs) during a flood disaster.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper undertakes a case study of the 2019 and 2020’s flood in Kerala, India. In-depth interviews with rehab workers during the flood are used in the study. Topic modelling and sentiment analysis are carried out using Twitter data. The native language responses from Facebook forums related to PWDs are analysed manually to construct taxonomy of problematic content

Findings

The results show that problematic content toward PWDs in the social media occurs during a flood. The extreme and exploitative content results in disability exclusion. Thus, e-participants fail to address the actual disability-specific requirements through social media during a disaster.

Research limitations/implications

The paper explores social media content toward PWDs. Implications of findings on citizens’ e-participation competency are delineated. Existing e-participation literature reports a low degree of disability e-participation in social media. Exploring disability e-participation helps to design more inclusive participation platforms. Further studies can explore the disability consciousness among e-participants for a more inclusive space.

Practical implications

The development of problematic content in the social media environment is alarming. Regulatory frameworks are also less adequate. Hence, policies for enabling inclusive participation that is not limited to the information technology infrastructure is needed.

Social implications

First, the citizens will get more insights for meaningful disability e-participation. Second, inclusive e-participation platform designs will help to reduce problematic content generation.

Originality/value

Disability e-participation requires regional studies. But there are fewer studies on disability e-participation from developing nations. The current study considered the regional context and complexities of disability e-participation. This paper gives policy recommendations for an inclusive e-participation.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 April 2021

Yurong Yao and Peng Xu

This study focuses on understanding how channel features can affect people's intention to continue to use an electronic channel in public affairs and their recommendation…

Abstract

Purpose

This study focuses on understanding how channel features can affect people's intention to continue to use an electronic channel in public affairs and their recommendation behaviors. Specifically, three different channels are focused on: email, microblogs and online meetings.

Design/methodology/approach

A research model on an e-participation channel based on the channel-disposition framework was developed and an online survey was conducted to collect data from 397 individuals who used three e-participation channels to validate seven hypotheses.

Findings

The study found that information quality, channel interaction quality and the social appearance of other citizens all had a significant impact on users' intention to continue to use an electronic channel, which, in turn, affected their recommendation behaviors. However, the impact differed across the three e-participation channels. Information quality had a stronger impact on microblog and online meeting users' intention to continue to use these channels than on email users' intention to continue using email to participate in public affairs. Channel interaction quality had a stronger impact on email users' intention to continue to use email than on microblog and online meeting users' intention to continue to use these channels in public affairs.

Originality/value

This study helps better explain how various channels and their features can affect participants' use intentions and behaviors in e-participation. It also provides practical guidance for government to better manage e-participation channels and effectively engage citizens in public affairs.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 14 August 2018

Mijail Naranjo-Zolotov, Tiago Oliveira and Sven Casteleyn

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how citizens’ perception of empowerment can influence the intention to use and intention to recommend e-participation.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how citizens’ perception of empowerment can influence the intention to use and intention to recommend e-participation.

Design/methodology/approach

A research model is evaluated using structural equation modelling. An online survey questionnaire was used to collect data from 210 users of e-participation.

Findings

The results show that psychological empowerment influences the intention to use and recommend e-participation. Performance expectancy and facilitating conditions were the strongest predictors of intention to use; effort expectancy and social influence had no significant effect on the prediction of intention to use e-participation.

Research limitations/implications

The use of psychological empowerment as a higher-order multidimensional construct is still insufficiently researched. Future research may explore the effect of each dimension of psychological empowerment in different scenarios of e-participation adoption. Caution is needed when generalising our findings towards the adoption of e-participation in different locations or with different participants.

Practical implications

The findings can help the local governments to design strategies for the promotion and diffusion of e-participation amongst the citizenry. Those strategies should focus on citizens’ perception of empowerment, thereby creating a positive attitude towards intention to use and recommend e-participation.

Originality/value

An innovative research model integrates the unified theory of acceptance, use of technology and psychological empowerment; the last as a higher-order construct.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Sreejith Alathur, P. Vigneswara Ilavarasan and M.P. Gupta

The purpose of the present paper is to attempt to examine the determinants of citizens’ electronic participation with respect to the communication aspects. To accomplish…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present paper is to attempt to examine the determinants of citizens’ electronic participation with respect to the communication aspects. To accomplish this objective, using the extant literature, the paper delineated factors that determine and the theories that can explain citizens’ e-participation. An analysis of citizens’ democratic communication through multiple e-participation forums is carried out, and the determinants of electronic participation are described in the paper.

Design/methodology/approach

In light of the literature, e-participation services were classified on the basis of characteristics of democratic communications. The factors that determine citizens’ online democratic participation were also identified and validated. Indian citizens who often e-participate were surveyed through online and offline questionnaires. A regression analysis of the 407 responses was carried out to predict the influence of individual, governance and technology components on various e-participation initiatives.

Findings

Citizens’ participation efficacy, value system and participation freedom were found to determine different e-participation initiatives. Further, e-participation is also found to be varyingly determined by the governance and technology components.

Research limitations/implications

The theoretical contribution of this study includes the classification of determining factors and the illustrative labeling (I, G and T) for an e-participation framework. The delineation of e-participation from democratic communication aspects also contributes to the e-participation literature. However, this research had considered only one set of e-participation services and had incorporated only select forms of e-participation that are in coherence with the services selected.

Originality/value

Past studies often consider separate e-participation forums and infrequently report a simultaneous analysis of multiple e-participation forums. The factors that determine citizens’ e-participation from a democratic communication aspect are also inadequately discussed. The significant contribution of this study includes policy recommendations to improve e-participation in different information and communication technologies initiatives.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 November 2018

Tuotuo Qi, Tianmei Wang, Yanlin Ma, Wei Zhang and Yanchun Zhu

Due to the increasing demand for public services, as a new form of public governance, e-participation has emerged. Scholars from various disciplines have published plenty…

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Abstract

Purpose

Due to the increasing demand for public services, as a new form of public governance, e-participation has emerged. Scholars from various disciplines have published plenty of research results on e-participation. This paper aims to reveal the research status frontiers directly by mapping knowledge domains.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors take 1,322 articles on e-participation published in Web of Science from 2001 to 2017 as research object. They then run the information visualization software CiteSpace to drill deeper into the literature data.

Findings

The study found that e-participation research has the obvious interdisciplinary feature; the author and institution cooperation networks with less internal cooperation are relatively sparse; the USA ranks first in the field of e-participation research, followed by the UK, with the other countries lagged behind; and e-participation through social media is gradually becoming the new research focus.

Originality/value

Based on the objective data and information visualization technology, the research intuitively reveals the research status and development trend of e-participation.

Details

International Journal of Crowd Science, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-7294

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 May 2011

Christopher G. Reddick

This paper aims to examine citizen interaction with e‐government using three e‐participation models. The two major research questions of this paper are: what is the…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine citizen interaction with e‐government using three e‐participation models. The two major research questions of this paper are: what is the current level of e‐participation in the USA?; and what factors explain why citizens participate in online government?

Design/methodology/approach

Survey evidence of citizens in the USA and their use of e‐participation is examined using quantitative methods.

Findings

Citizens were most likely to use e‐participation for management activities. Citizens were much less likely to use the internet for more advanced consultative and participatory activities. Using regression analysis, factors such as demand by citizens for e‐government, the digital divide, and political factors influenced the level of e‐participation.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study imply that governments should do more to stimulate demand for e‐government, address issues of the digital divide, and provide for more open and transparent government. A limitation of this study is its focus on e‐participation through a survey instrument, which does not consider all possible forms of e‐participation.

Practical implications

For e‐participation to blossom, governments should do more to promote citizens' demand for e‐government, bridge the digital divide, and promote more open and transparent government.

Originality/value

Existing research on e‐participation has focused on theory building and case studies; this paper provides empirical evidence, through a survey, of the level of e‐participation and factors that promote e‐participation.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Anna Maria Al Zubaidi-Polli and Nervo Verdezoto

Public participation is an important – if not the most important – pillar of democracy. When designing new e-participation environments, it is advisable to consider…

Abstract

Purpose

Public participation is an important – if not the most important – pillar of democracy. When designing new e-participation environments, it is advisable to consider previous appropriation practices of deliberative community networks to encourage broad participation. This can be achieved by sharing appropriation practices and by supporting the situated development of use, which may not only increase user participation but also decrease user frustration.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper addresses previously analyzed e-participation appropriation practices and technological limitations that participants faced when using the e-participation environment from the Aarhus’s Artwork design experiment. The lessons learned from these limitations and the appropriation practices identified help us in designing the next generation of e-participation environments and in counteracting their unsuccessful appropriation.

Findings

Potential design improvements for future collaborative writing e-environments that facilitate location-agnostic participation, and improvements that enable successful technology appropriation are presented.

Originality/value

These improvements are important to future research to inform a hybrid of in situ and ex situ technologies that enable collaborative writing to increase public participation in leisure spaces, engage a broader range of citizens and thus also encourage less motivated people.

Article
Publication date: 16 May 2016

Lana Bataineh and Emad Abu-Shanab

This study aims to predict the intention to participate (ITP) in public activities by utilizing five levels of e-participation reported in the literature. The study used…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to predict the intention to participate (ITP) in public activities by utilizing five levels of e-participation reported in the literature. The study used the levels of e-informing, e-consulting, e-involving, e-collaborating and e-empowering as predictors of the intention to participate in e-government services.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical test was adopted using a survey to measure the five levels of e-participation and the dependent variable, ITP in e-government initiatives. The survey included items from previous studies translated to Arabic. Subjects responded to a five-point Likert scale to measure their perceptions regarding the sub-dimensions of each e-participation level. Statistical analyses of the collected data were conducted to test the assumed hypotheses. Multiple regression of the five predictor levels was conducted to predict the ITP in e-government services.

Findings

All the estimated means of e-participation levels were moderately perceived. The regression results indicated a significant prediction of three levels: e-informing, e-consulting and e-empowering. The other two levels (e-involving and e-collaborating) failed to predict the ITP. The coefficient of determination R2 resulting from the regression test was significant at the 0.001 level, which explained 61.9 per cent of the variance in the dependent variable.

Research limitations/implications

The instrument used is a newly developed one in Arabic language, which might have influenced the results. The distinction between e-involving and e-collaborating might not have been recognized by subjects, which might have increased the limitations of the study. The results of this study call for more research to validate the instrument and try to see if new statements of e-consulting and e-involving might be employed. The other side could be to reduce the levels to three levels only or merge the insignificant ones into one (four levels only).

Practical implications

Governments need to assert the role of citizens in the decision-making process. Such assertion is done through the e-participation process.

Social implications

Jordanians perceive the e-informing and e-consulting levels to be a foundation that can be easily attained, but jumping to the e-empowering level means that the society is keen on the partnership with the government.

Originality/value

This study is the first to use the participation levels (five levels) as predictors of the ITP. Most studies have utilized theories such as technology acceptance model (TAM), theory of reseaoned action (TRA) and unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) and other technology adoption theories. Also, this research has established ground for an Arabic survey to measure such levels, regardless of their prediction or description purpose.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2007

Kim Viborg Andersen, Helle Zinner Henriksen, Christine Secher and Rony Medaglia

This paper aims to discuss the cost of e‐participation from the managerial perspective.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the cost of e‐participation from the managerial perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The use of digital media to consult and engage citizens and companies in the decision‐making process is a way of improving the design and legitimatization of decisions, as well as potentially increasing the likelihood of successful implementation of policies. This paper discusses if the potential economic benefits from increased or qualitatively improved involvement inherently are long term and have to compete with other activities undertaken by government.

Findings

There are great uncertainties regarding the magnitude of the positive effects on governance since there are not only positive, but also negative externalities of e‐participation; thus, there are major challenges in measuring and capitalizing on the e‐participation. Part of the reason for the uncertainty is the lack of explicit awareness of the choice of technology, communication style and institutional approach to implementing e‐participation. Further, there is the need to be aware of the administrative costs in transferring e‐participation practices and techniques.

Originality/value

The perspective on cost of e‐participation is not well explored. The discussion raised emphasizes the urgency of the issue.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Christopher Reddick and Donald F. Norris

The purpose of this research is to examine factors that explain top governmental officials' support for e-participation in American local governments, and to examine the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to examine factors that explain top governmental officials' support for e-participation in American local governments, and to examine the impacts of e-participation adoption on local governments in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilizes a national survey of e-participation among US local governments, which examines factors that predict greater political-managerial support for e-participation and factors associated with positive impacts from e-participation.

Findings

This research found that demand was the most important factor predicting political-managerial support for e-participation and impacts.

Research limitations/implications

This study produced somewhat limited results partly because relatively few of the responding governments had adopted any significant number of e-participation activities. A second limitation is that the authors took a quantitative approach to e-participation supports and impacts, which did not enable them to tease out some of the more subtle nuisances of e-participation adoption and its impact on government. A third limitation is that the authors conducted the research only on governments at the local level in one nation.

Practical implications

Local governments should ensure top level (elected and appointed officials) support for e-participation for it to be successful. Citizen demand, formal planning, and taking e-participation are seriously also associated with adoption and positive impacts. So, local governments should consider these factors when developing e-participation.

Originality/value

This study is first to examine the impacts of e-participation adoption on local governments in the USA.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

1 – 10 of 528