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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2012

Chuma Okafor, Ken Russell and Labaran Lawal

Purpose – The chapter seeks to examine the changing nature of competition during and immediately after the consolidation within the context of Nigerian banking sector…

Abstract

Purpose – The chapter seeks to examine the changing nature of competition during and immediately after the consolidation within the context of Nigerian banking sector reform.

Design/methodology/approach – The chapter deploys the Herfindahl–Hirschman Index, interest rate spread and conducted interviews with senior bank managers to test the hypothesis that there was no change in competition.

Findings – The results obtained support the CBN's expectation of sustained competition and higher efficiency levels, resulting in a minimal reduction of interest rate spread.

Originality/value – This is the first study that examines the changing nature of competition resulting from the 2004–2006 Nigerian banking consolidation.

Details

Finance and Development in Africa
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-225-7

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2018

Anita Nordsteien and Katriina Byström

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate how new healthcare professionals engage with information practices and information culture in their workplace, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate how new healthcare professionals engage with information practices and information culture in their workplace, and the resulting influences on development and change.

Design/methodology/approach

A longitudinal study was conducted on a hospital training programme. Three series of focus groups provided data from 18 recently qualified nurses, supported by observations. Data were thematically analysed applying a framework consisting of six approaches to information use.

Findings

Newcomers take a proactive approach to seek, use and share scientific information, which is negotiated within existing information practices and organisational information culture. Their competencies, such as research skills, values, motivation and sense of integrity to use and share scientific information, often differ from those existing workplace practices. For this reason, they drive towards renewal and change.

Practical implications

Examination of organisational approaches to information use indicates clearly the necessity for improvements to meet the needs of information proactiveness and thus be able to face challenges and changes in an organisation.

Originality/value

This work sheds new light on newcomers’ information use, as they integrate into a workplace and interact with information practices and organisational approaches to information use. A significant contribution is the identification of the dynamics and interdependencies between newcomers’ individual agency in their way of seeking, using and sharing information, and the established community’s social agency promoting existing information practices and the organisational agency represented by information culture.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 74 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2012

Chuma Okafor, Ken Russell and Labaran Lawal

Purpose – The chapter tests the effects of capitalisation on market structure within the context of Nigerian banking sector reform.Design/methodology/approach – The…

Abstract

Purpose – The chapter tests the effects of capitalisation on market structure within the context of Nigerian banking sector reform.

Design/methodology/approach – The chapter is based on data collected through secondary sources, mainly from financial statements of banks audited by the CBN. The time period under review is 2001–2009, encompasses the 18 months transitional window and a trajectory of 3 years before the consolidation announcement. Quantitative methods were used to analyse available data.

Findings – The result confirms that banking consolidation led to an increase in the size of the top end of Nigerian banks.

Originality/value – This is the first study that tests the effects of capitalisation on market structure of the Nigerian banking sector.

Details

Finance and Development in Africa
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-225-7

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2013

Xingling Tian, Naisheng Li, Zhiguo Zhang, Xu Chen, Yang Wang and Wolfgang Peter Weinhold

The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of restoration of gold foils on Dazu Grottoes using different parylene coatings.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of restoration of gold foils on Dazu Grottoes using different parylene coatings.

Design/methodology/approach

The gold foil samples were applied with two types of parylene coating with six different thicknesses, C‐10, C‐15, C‐20, N‐10, N‐20, N‐25, respectively. Electrochemical impedance, surface morphology, and hydrophobicity properties were used to examine the behavior of the coatings.

Findings

The results showed that an increase in electrochemical corrosion resistance was observed as the degree of coating thickness was increased for both C‐parylene and N‐parylene coatings. In addition, the surface morphology study, using 3D topography measurement, indicated that the surface roughness was decreased for all parylene coatings. Furthermore, the parylene‐C coating was comparatively more effective than was the parylene‐N coating.

Originality/value

The results obtained from the three methods were in close agreement. This is an indication that the parylene‐C coating can be used to restore the gold foils on Dazu Grottoes and to support future restoration and consolidation to be applied on site on the Grottoes.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 60 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2008

Joseph K. Achua

The ongoing reforms in the Nigerian banking system have resulted to mega banks, driven by advanced competition. This has raised concerns about their social and…

Abstract

Purpose

The ongoing reforms in the Nigerian banking system have resulted to mega banks, driven by advanced competition. This has raised concerns about their social and environmental performance. The purpose of this paper is to agitate for the prioritization of corporate social responsibility (CSR) as the foremost condition for banking stability in the reforms.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws largely from the theory of CSR, and reviews pertinent policies and practices in the Nigerian banking system.

Findings

The paper identifies self‐induced vices, regulatory laxity, inauspicious macro‐economic environment, and endemic corruption in the economy as the major constraints to the discharge of CSR in the Nigerian banking system.

Practical implications

It may be necessary to restructure the Central Bank of Nigeria to clearly separate the roles of banks' supervision from fiscal policy management for a more effective economic, social and environmental viability of the banking system. Furthermore, the banking system should focus less exclusively on shareholders and financial measures of success to include all stakeholders' relationships in their mission to sustain competitive success in the future.

Originality/value

It is imperative that external regulation should be blended with conscious self‐regulations by the banking institutions for the reforms to effectively include the delivery of CSR. This should be anchored on effective corporate governance in the banking institutions in the system.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2008

Jean‐Marc Feron, Lac Hong Nguyen Tan, Dominique Pestiaux and Vincent Lorant

Background. High and variable rates of attendance at GP consultations in prisons are observed. The aim of the study is to have a clearer understanding of social factors…

Abstract

Background. High and variable rates of attendance at GP consultations in prisons are observed. The aim of the study is to have a clearer understanding of social factors influencing inmates’ help‐seeking behaviour and demand for primary health care. Methods. A qualitative study was carried out in five Belgian prisons (three Dutch‐speaking and two French‐speaking). Twenty‐five male inmates were interviewed face‐to‐face and 18 caregivers (7 nurses and 11 GPs) in focus groups. Results. Five main social factors explain inmates’ help‐seeking behaviour and demand for primary health care: (1) inmates’ negative perception of imprisonment increases help‐seeking behaviour; (2) inmates use their rights to health care as strategies to maintain some form of control over their lives; (3) the doctor’s role distorts expression of need and demand; (4) health professionals’ control over inmates’ lives creates mistrust and a controlling therapeutic relationship; and (5) lack of alternatives to health care. These factors are mutually dependent and cause a confrontation in the inmates’ and clinicians’ agendas. Conclusion. The most important recommendation is to understand what the inmates are really seeking in their demands. This information can be used to develop appropriate alternatives in terms of human support and well‐being facilities. The therapeutic and security roles of health care workers should be separated, in order to increase the trust that is central to the therapeutic relationship between them and inmates.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Book part
Publication date: 19 June 2019

Bruno S. Sergi, Elena G. Popkova, Natalia Vovchenko and Marina Ponomareva

This chapter elaborates on the perspectives of financial development of countries of Central Asia and China through cooperation with Russia. The authors determine…

Abstract

This chapter elaborates on the perspectives of financial development of countries of Central Asia and China through cooperation with Russia. The authors determine financial resources for the development of the countries of Central Asia and China and figure out possible scenarios for attracting additional financial resources and conclude that financial resources have a decisive role in socioeconomic development. It is substantiated that the increase and expansion of cooperation with Russia are the preferable scenario for attracting additional financial resources. The authors recommend expanding cooperation with Russia within the implementation of the selected optimal scenario are given.

Details

Asia-Pacific Contemporary Finance and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-273-3

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Book part
Publication date: 4 March 2015

Rustam Jamilov

I contribute to the ongoing policy discourse on the challenges of monetary policy transmission in environments with consolidated financial sectors and high credit rates. I…

Abstract

I contribute to the ongoing policy discourse on the challenges of monetary policy transmission in environments with consolidated financial sectors and high credit rates. I empirically investigate the lending rate pass-through in Azerbaijan – a small resource-rich economy in transition – by taking advantage of a unique set of high-frequency bank-level data. My bottom-line policy message is the following. First, lending rates are considerably irresponsive to monetary policy shocks, and the interest rate channel ought to be somehow improved. Second, macroeconomic fundamentals and the concentrated bank sector are surprisingly not among the reasons behind the policy-market disconnect. Third, domestic commercial banks are able to exert substantial monopolistic pricing capacities and keep credit rates high, particularly when the central bank loosens its policy stance. Fourth, the underlying cause of both monetary policy inefficacy and high interest rate stickiness appears to be structural excess liquidity. In fact, empirical results show that pass-through is substantially higher for less liquid banks. Extraction of excess liquidity from the system should mitigate the banks’ monopolistic pricing powers, improve the efficiency of the interest rate channel, and ultimately bring the credit rates down.

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2017

Elmas Yaldız Hanedar, Avni Önder Hanedar and Ferdi Çelikay

Inefficiencies in the fiscal and monetary systems of the Ottoman Empire led to a higher debt burden over time and the bankruptcy for the Ottoman state in 1875. To deal…

Abstract

Inefficiencies in the fiscal and monetary systems of the Ottoman Empire led to a higher debt burden over time and the bankruptcy for the Ottoman state in 1875. To deal with these inefficiencies, reforms were implemented: supervisory organizations were established and the gold standard was adopted. How did investors at the Istanbul Bourse view these reforms? We manually collected data on the price of Ottoman government bonds on the Bourse from 1873 to 1883. Using the generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (GARCH) methodology, we identify short-run and permanent changes in volatility of bond returns subsequent to the reforms. Our results suggest investors responded positively, by accepting lower yield premia, to adoption of the gold standard, and foundation of the Ottoman Public Debt Administration which had European sponsors, but did not respond positively to reforms that relied on purely local institutions.

Details

Research in Economic History
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-120-1

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Article
Publication date: 19 February 2020

Waheed Akhter, Vasileios Pappas and Saad Ullah Khan

In this paper, we aim to assess insurance demand across selected Asian and OECD countries during the period of the global financial crisis.

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper, we aim to assess insurance demand across selected Asian and OECD countries during the period of the global financial crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

We collected data from 55 emerging Asian and OECD countries during the period of the global financial crisis. Our methodology relies on panel regressions. Separate models are run for the Asia/OECD economies and a follow-up distinction between high/low-income regions is also made.

Findings

We find that global financial crisis affects negatively the general insurance demand particularly in high-income region. Higher dependency ratio in Asia tends to decrease insurance demand, whereas education in case of Asia positively influences insurance demand indicating that higher literacy rate can be helpful to capture the potential customers. Our results further reveal that life insurance is an important driver for insurance demand in OECD countries, whereas general insurance demand is higher in the Asian economies.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of this study is that data sets employed do not differentiate between different life and general insurance products.

Practical implications

This study is helpful for regulators, policymakers and insurance providers to evaluate, assess and monitor insurance demand in relevant countries.

Originality/value

This is one of the pioneering studies that have assessed insurance demand among emerging Asian and OECD countries during the period of the global financial crisis.

Peer review

The peer review history for this article is available at: https://publons.com/publon/10.1108/IJSE-08-2019-0523

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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