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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2012

Rajib Shaw and Noralene Uy

The key concept of ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) is how to think of ecosystem in daily lifestyles (both in urban and rural areas), and how ecosystem-based adaptation…

Abstract

The key concept of ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) is how to think of ecosystem in daily lifestyles (both in urban and rural areas), and how ecosystem-based adaptation can be a tool to adapt daily lives in changing climatic conditions. Sustainably managing, conserving, and restoring ecosystems so that they continue to provide the services that allow people to adapt to climate change is known as ecosystem-based adaptation. Summarizing the key observations provided in the earlier chapters, this chapter provides the ways of action-oriented ecosystem-based adaptation.

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Golnar Pooya, Nathan Cheng, Anthony Marshall, Jacob Dencik and Namit Agrawal

Ecosystems’ digitally enabled networks that enhance corporate value propositions by linking corporate units, suppliers, distributors, partners, customers and other…

Abstract

Purpose

Ecosystems’ digitally enabled networks that enhance corporate value propositions by linking corporate units, suppliers, distributors, partners, customers and other stakeholders -- have become the engine that drives performance and strategic impact across economies. Article examines which ecosystem strategies are appropriate for firms in various situations.

Design/methodology/approach

A new IBM Institute for Business Value (IBV) survey of 700 executives involved in decision-making about their organizations’ ecosystem growth and partnering reveals that the companies most focused on ecosystem engagement consistently generate higher growth and more business value.

Findings

Analysis of the executive responses identified four distinct strategic approaches for ecosystem activity – Accelerate, Expand, Ignite and Reposition.

Practical/implications

Success is likely only if firms pursue the right ecosystem strategy for their situation, with the right business partners, executed the right way.

Originality/value

Ecosystems can enhance the value of products or services through both competition and cooperation with partners and rivals. For enterprises battling dislocation and disruption, ecosystems promote agility and resilience and can identify new revenue opportunities. As such, ecosystems have been the essential vehicle for growth and expansion for many corporations.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 49 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Article
Publication date: 9 August 2022

Huanren Zhang, Yimei Hu, Xianwei Shi and Yuchen Gao

Studies have documented the distinctive advantage of innovation ecosystems in integrating and recombining heterogeneous knowledge resources across firms' boundaries…

Abstract

Purpose

Studies have documented the distinctive advantage of innovation ecosystems in integrating and recombining heterogeneous knowledge resources across firms' boundaries. However, hierarchical governance in the form of vertical integration is still preferred in many industries for organizing innovation, and the current literature touches little on the relative performance of different organizational structures (integrated firms vs innovation ecosystem) and the factors that lead firms to choose one over the other. The authors conjecture that structure of technological interdependence is one of such important factors. Using a computational experiment, the authors compare the innovation performance of ecosystems with integrated firms under different interdependency structures.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the NKC model, the authors incorporate non-generic complementarities and modularity into the technological interdependence between different components. The authors compare four different types of technological interdependence (modular, hierarchical, nearly modular, and random).

Findings

The results show that integrated firms with centralized search demonstrate stable and consistent performance that is robust to the structure of technological interdependencies, but an ecosystem significantly outperforms integrated firms with centralized or decentralized when the products exhibit modular or nearly-modular structures.

Originality/value

This study sheds light on why an ecosystem often exhibits modular structures while vertical integration is prevalent in industries with complex technological interdependence. In addition, it shows the evolutionary nature of ecosystems and indicates how the cooperation and competition between actors shape the interdependence structure of ecosystems.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 August 2022

Robert C. Ford, John T. Bowen and Stacey Yates

The purpose of this study is to add new insights into the discussion of how a city’s destination marketing organization (DMO) can apply operant resources to act upon its…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to add new insights into the discussion of how a city’s destination marketing organization (DMO) can apply operant resources to act upon its operant resources to create, market and manage a unique brand over time.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses an abductive approach to advance understanding of how to execute a branding strategy that evolves over time while strategically curating its unique and valued resources. This understanding is based on an in-depth review of Louisville’s branding journey, including written documents and interviews with people involved in building the branding strategy.

Findings

This paper presents a model to help destinations focus on how to create, market and manage the delivery of a branded ecosystem that capitalizes on its resources. The study adds new insights into how DMOs can curate a destination’s resources into an ecosystem that delivers its brand promise over time.

Originality/value

The study introduces the idea of ecotopes to expand an understanding of tourism ecosystems, it presents the concept of a customer journey to depict a destination’s branding strategy, incorporates Barney’s Resource Based Theory (Barney & Clark, 2007) into the process of creating a destination’s brand and applies Barnard’s (1938) classic Acceptance Theory of Authority to explain how DMOs can execute a destination’s branding strategy.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 January 2014

Haydn Shaughnessy

This article introduces the concept of a industry phase change. Phase-changes are historical transitions, ones that create a new industry and consumer ecosystem. They are

1415

Abstract

Purpose

This article introduces the concept of a industry phase change. Phase-changes are historical transitions, ones that create a new industry and consumer ecosystem. They are not merely disruptive technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

A phase-change is marked by a complex transformation in human behavior produced by a new way to satisfy consumption needs. The Kodak case is described.

Findings

A current phase-change sweeping many business sectors is driven by the growing search for competitive advantage through connected ecosystems of stakeholders that co-create value – customers, innovators, partners and communities.

Practical implications

Co-creative ecosystems are a phase-change that requires a new set of executive and management skills, a different culture, a new approach to information, as well as new forms of leadership.

Originality/value

Explains the success factors of the four major types of modern ecosystems: scale ecosystems; creative commons/open source ecosystems; customer ecosystems; and systemic ecosystems. Shows how Kodak was disrupted by its lack of understanding of ecosystems management.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Steven Davidson, Martin Harmer and Anthony Marshall

This article identifies a new transactional system–the business ecosystem. It describes the characteristics and drivers of these complex webs of interdependent enterprises…

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Abstract

Purpose

This article identifies a new transactional system–the business ecosystem. It describes the characteristics and drivers of these complex webs of interdependent enterprises and other participants which create unique value through synergistic relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The article explains how innovative organizations can seek new opportunities and develop new competencies in business ecosystems they will explicitly create or participate in.

Findings

Ecosystems provide stimulus for, and a path to organizational and industry transformation – connecting people and organizations in new and different ways, and providing access to skills and expertise often unavailable outside the ecosystem.

Practical implications

The authors have identified a spectrum of ecosystem archetypes that they call the Shark Tank, the Hornet’s Nest, the Wolf Pack and the Lion’s Pride. They analyze the success strategies for each.

Originality/value

This article methodically diagrams the strategies for success in the emerging ecosystem economy. It identifies the key drivers of value in these new kinds of networks and offers corporate leaders actionable advice on how to position their firms in specific types of ecosystems.

Article
Publication date: 20 May 2020

Anthony Marshall, Anthony Lipp, Kazuaki Ikeda and Raj Rohit Singh

Ecosystem partnerships are driving a dramatic change in the nature of business as industries as diverse as banking, automotive and retail are converging in unprecedented…

Abstract

Purpose

Ecosystem partnerships are driving a dramatic change in the nature of business as industries as diverse as banking, automotive and retail are converging in unprecedented ways–and at an unprecedented rate. To learn how leading companies are embracing innovation in ecosystems to drive both value creation and competitiveness, the IBM Institute for Business Value in collaboration with Oxford Economics surveyed 1000 top executives in 19 industries and 29 countries between August and January 2019.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey cohort included 250 Chief Executive Officers, 150 Chief Financial Officers, 150 Chief Innovation Officers, 150 Chief Marketing Officers, 150 Chief Operations Officer and 150 Chief Alliance/Partnership Officers.

Findings

Analysis revealed that organizations with high engagement in ecosystems generate greater revenues from innovation initiatives. Specifically, revenues tied to innovation were more than 14 percent higher for ecosystem-engaged businesses than their less ecosystem-oriented peers.

Practical implications

The analysis showed that organizations differentiated on four innovation-enabling dimensions are more successful than others in ecosystem innovation. Their winning practices: 10;•9;They lead with platforms for innovating in ecosystems. 10;•9;They create the structures that enable the transformation of ideas into desired customer experiences in ecosystems 10;•9;They establish effective, meaningful measurements for successful innovation in ecosystems. 10;•9;They approach innovation with a collaborative mindset and create an environment of openness that shapes innovative behavior. 10;

Originality/value

The study identified the best practices of the most successful companies, ecosystem innovators. They excel across four innovation dimensions. They build platforms and employ ecosystems to better orchestrate customer experiences. They establish processes to effectively measure innovation within ecosystems in which they operate. They form organizational structures that institutionalize innovation. And they create and promote environments of openness and collaboration

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 5 July 2022

Luca Marinelli, Sara Bartoloni, Federica Pascucci, Gian Luca Gregori and Massimiliano Farina Briamonte

The aim of the study is to explore the genesis of entrepreneurial ecosystems (EE) and highlight the role played by intellectual capital (IC) in that process. Specifically…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the study is to explore the genesis of entrepreneurial ecosystems (EE) and highlight the role played by intellectual capital (IC) in that process. Specifically, the paper adopts the collective intelligence approach, and the study shows how human capital (HC), structural capital (SC) and relational capital (RC) interact to create an entrepreneurial ecosystem.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a single case study of an Italian EE. The data analysis is based upon the collection of different sources of data: semi-structured interviews with representatives of each actor of the ecosystem; email correspondence; meetings report; a 24-months period of direct observation. Given the novelty of the topic, the qualitative method seems well suited for studying innovation-based EE since the method offers rich data about a phenomenon in real-life context.

Findings

The case is a top-down, innovation-based EE in which all main components of the IC play a crucial role from the initial stage. Findings show how the constant interchange between IC components occurs at two different levels: the micro and the meso level. HC and RC play major roles at both levels, whilst SC only occurs at a meso level, representing the environment in which the whole ecosystem takes place. Additionally, the use case, a new intangible asset integrating all three components of IC, emerged as one of the main outcomes of this innovation-based EE.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to a rather unexplored topic in the existing literature on EE and IC, namely the formation process of EE and the role played by IC within that process. Additionally, through the application of the collective intelligence approach, the authors shed light on the need to manage IC at both micro and meso level in the creation of an EE.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2022

Bingqing Xiong, Eric Tze Kuan Lim, Chee-Wee Tan, Zheng Zhao and Yugang Yu

The concept of open innovation has captured the attention of both academics and practitioners alike. However, there is a dearth of research on how innovations can be…

Abstract

Purpose

The concept of open innovation has captured the attention of both academics and practitioners alike. However, there is a dearth of research on how innovations can be diffused within open innovation ecosystems, a critical condition for the sustainability of such ecosystems. In this regard, the study advances a research agenda for guiding future inquiries into innovation diffusion within open innovation ecosystems.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a systematic review of the extant literature on open innovation, this article identifies knowledge gaps in innovation diffusion, along with recommendations for bridging these gaps in the future. The study advocates that future research should consider not only innovation generation processes, but also innovation diffusion processes, especially in light of the growing application of open innovation in the context of digital goods and services.

Findings

Subscribing to an evolutionary view of innovation diffusion, the article draws on a five-phase framework – knowledge, persuasion, decision, implementation, and confirmation – to illustrate the roles played by three distinct yet interconnected parties (i.e. platforms, complementors, and individuals) within open innovation ecosystems as well as the research opportunities it brings.

Originality/value

The article examines the critical, yet underexplored role of innovation diffusion in sustaining open innovation ecosystems and outlines potential research avenues that can contribute to growing the understanding of the innovation diffusion process.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2022

Ardian Adhiatma, Olivia Fachrunnisa, Nurhidayati and Tina Rahayu

The digitization efforts for small and medium enterprises (SMEs) as a result of advances in information technology are challenging, with one of them being the creation of…

Abstract

Purpose

The digitization efforts for small and medium enterprises (SMEs) as a result of advances in information technology are challenging, with one of them being the creation of digital ecosystems for SMEs. This study aims to develop a model of the relationship between SMEs’ readiness to change, agile leadership and dynamic capability to implement a digital ecosystem for SMEs in the creative industry in Semarang, Central Java, Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey methodology was used in this study. Respondents in this study were creative industry SMEs in Semarang, Central Java, Indonesia. SMEs in the creative industry sector were chosen as samples as they require digital technology to manage their business development, production and distribution, customer relationships and to innovate in their businesses. In total, 250 creative SMEs, selected based on a purposive random sampling method, were included in this study. Data were analyzed using structural equation model-partial least square.

Findings

This study provides current insights and future needs for implementing digital ecosystems in SMEs in Indonesia’s creative industries. It also identifies three critical conditions for dealing with Industry 4.0: organizational readiness to change, agile leadership and dynamic capability.

Originality/value

In response to information technology advancements, this study proposes a new model for implementing digital ecosystems for SMEs. Furthermore, this study adds knowledge about the concept of a service-oriented technology ecosystem to help SMEs operate more efficiently. It focuses on the interaction of entities to improve the system’s utility, gain benefits and promote information exchange.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

Keywords

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