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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2012

Rajib Shaw and Noralene Uy

The key concept of ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) is how to think of ecosystem in daily lifestyles (both in urban and rural areas), and how ecosystem-based adaptation…

Abstract

The key concept of ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) is how to think of ecosystem in daily lifestyles (both in urban and rural areas), and how ecosystem-based adaptation can be a tool to adapt daily lives in changing climatic conditions. Sustainably managing, conserving, and restoring ecosystems so that they continue to provide the services that allow people to adapt to climate change is known as ecosystem-based adaptation. Summarizing the key observations provided in the earlier chapters, this chapter provides the ways of action-oriented ecosystem-based adaptation.

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Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2021

Stephen Denning

The author discusses the challenges of implementing a digital ecosystem, a way of transcending the boundaries of a firm to include additional producers to provide more…

Abstract

Purpose

The author discusses the challenges of implementing a digital ecosystem, a way of transcending the boundaries of a firm to include additional producers to provide more value to customers and also by making customers active partners.

Design/methodology/approach

An ecosystem is intentionally organized to generate, facilitate and benefit from interactions rather than transactions.

Findings

The author explains how firms can make the customers active participants in creating and evolving the network by embracing the dynamic concept of an ecosystem.

Practical/implications

The ecosystem becomes more valuable to users as more users join.

Originality/value

Essential reading for executives experimenting with corporate digital platforms.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2014

Haydn Shaughnessy

This article introduces the concept of a industry phase change. Phase-changes are historical transitions, ones that create a new industry and consumer ecosystem. They are

Abstract

Purpose

This article introduces the concept of a industry phase change. Phase-changes are historical transitions, ones that create a new industry and consumer ecosystem. They are not merely disruptive technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

A phase-change is marked by a complex transformation in human behavior produced by a new way to satisfy consumption needs. The Kodak case is described.

Findings

A current phase-change sweeping many business sectors is driven by the growing search for competitive advantage through connected ecosystems of stakeholders that co-create value – customers, innovators, partners and communities.

Practical implications

Co-creative ecosystems are a phase-change that requires a new set of executive and management skills, a different culture, a new approach to information, as well as new forms of leadership.

Originality/value

Explains the success factors of the four major types of modern ecosystems: scale ecosystems; creative commons/open source ecosystems; customer ecosystems; and systemic ecosystems. Shows how Kodak was disrupted by its lack of understanding of ecosystems management.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Steven Davidson, Martin Harmer and Anthony Marshall

This article identifies a new transactional system–the business ecosystem. It describes the characteristics and drivers of these complex webs of interdependent enterprises…

Abstract

Purpose

This article identifies a new transactional system–the business ecosystem. It describes the characteristics and drivers of these complex webs of interdependent enterprises and other participants which create unique value through synergistic relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The article explains how innovative organizations can seek new opportunities and develop new competencies in business ecosystems they will explicitly create or participate in.

Findings

Ecosystems provide stimulus for, and a path to organizational and industry transformation – connecting people and organizations in new and different ways, and providing access to skills and expertise often unavailable outside the ecosystem.

Practical implications

The authors have identified a spectrum of ecosystem archetypes that they call the Shark Tank, the Hornet’s Nest, the Wolf Pack and the Lion’s Pride. They analyze the success strategies for each.

Originality/value

This article methodically diagrams the strategies for success in the emerging ecosystem economy. It identifies the key drivers of value in these new kinds of networks and offers corporate leaders actionable advice on how to position their firms in specific types of ecosystems.

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Article
Publication date: 23 June 2021

Kjersti Kjos Longva

The purpose of the paper is to provide insight into how students navigate entrepreneurial ecosystems and make use of social networks as they create their own ventures…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to provide insight into how students navigate entrepreneurial ecosystems and make use of social networks as they create their own ventures. Such ecosystems for students are an understudied phenomenon and there is a need for more profound insights into the issue in order to build better support systems for student entrepreneurs. The study aims to increase understanding on the elements that are important in students' entrepreneurial ecosystems and how these impact on students' venture creation processes, with emphasize on the role social networks play. Student entrepreneurs account for a substantial number of the startups that come into being at universities. Understanding more about how the surroundings affects this process is important for facilitating student entrepreneurship in higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is qualitative and makes use of in-depth interviews with student entrepreneurs, educators and support actors in the ecosystems. Multiple actors were interviewed in order to capture different perspectives on the matter, with a total of 15 interviews conducted.

Findings

Two main findings arose from the study. First, it provides insight into elements that are perceived as important for student venture creation by the student entrepreneurs themselves, by educators and by support actors in the ecosystems. Second, it describes how the elements make up the entrepreneurial ecosystems surrounding the students, which serve as platforms from which students can develop their social networks. Therefore, the study highlights how such ecosystems can serve as sources from which students can gain access to ideas, resources and identity processes.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of the study is that the interviews took place in one country. Consequently, further investigation is necessary to establish whether the findings are valid in other contexts. The research has implications for higher educational institutions, policymakers and researchers concerned with student entrepreneurship and student venture creation.

Originality/value

The study contributes empirical findings on a topic that is currently not well understood and on which there are few empirical studies. While student ventures represent a substantial proportion of university spin-offs, the topic has received little attention compared to research on academic entrepreneurship. The study represents a step towards enhancing understanding of students' entrepreneurial ecosystems and how students gain access to resources through social network ties within these systems.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2021

Bhaveshkumar Nandanram Pasi, Subhash K. Mahajan and Santosh B. Rane

The purpose of this paper is to develop an industry 4.0 (I4.0) innovation ecosystem framework by exploring the essential components of the same to ensure the collaborative…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an industry 4.0 (I4.0) innovation ecosystem framework by exploring the essential components of the same to ensure the collaborative efforts of different stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

In this research work, important perspectives and their sub-components for the I4.0 innovation ecosystem framework are identified by performing a systematic literature survey of peer-reviewed journal articles. Then, I4.0 challenges among higher education (HE) institutions students and industries in India are explored by adopting the questionnaire-based research approach. Finally, the importance of the identified perspectives and their sub-components and causal relations among components are analyzed by using the decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory method.

Findings

From the literature survey, three perspectives and their 45 sub-components are identified for the I4.0 innovation ecosystem framework. The outcomes show that the industry has a direct impact on HE institutions and the government. While HE institutions are most influenced by the industry and government.

Research limitations/implications

I4.0 innovation ecosystem framework is developed by analyzing responses received through questionnaires. There are other methods also available for ecosystem framework development, which are beyond this study.

Practical implications

This research work will facilitate policy formulation by the government. It will also help the managers to develop strategies for the adoption of I4.0 enabling technologies in their business.

Originality/value

This research study gives an idea about the innovation ecosystem framework for the successful adoption of I4.0 enabling technologies in Indian Manufacturing Industries.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2021

Mark Johnson, Jens K. Roehrich, Mehmet Chakkol and Andrew Davies

This research bridges disparate research on servitization, namely product–service systems (PSS) and integrated solutions (IS), to provide valuable insights for the…

Abstract

Purpose

This research bridges disparate research on servitization, namely product–service systems (PSS) and integrated solutions (IS), to provide valuable insights for the progression of the field. It acts as a reconciliation of these research streams and offers a reconceptualised agenda incorporating recent research on platforms, ecosystems, modularity, risk and governance as key conceptual themes to synthesise and build theory.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual, theory development article focused on advancing thinking on servitization by identifying systematic and theoretically informed research themes. It also proposes future research opportunities to advance theoretical contributions and practical implications for servitization research.

Findings

By reviewing and synthesising extant PSS and IS research, this article identified five core themes – namely modularity, platforms, ecosystems, risks and governance. The importance of these five themes and their linkages to PSS and IS are examined and a theoretical framework with a future research agenda to advance servitization is proposed.

Originality/value

This paper considers the similarities and differences between PSS and IS in order to develop a theory and to reconcile formerly disparate research efforts by establishing linkages between core themes and identifying valuable synergies for scholars. The importance of the core themes and current gaps within and across these themes are shown, and a mid-range theory for servitization is positioned to bridge the servitization-related PSS and IS communities.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2021

Pilar Gardiazabal and Constanza Bianchi

This paper aims to analyze the well-being consequences of value co-creation activities at an ecosystem level, focusing specifically on the micro and meso levels. This…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze the well-being consequences of value co-creation activities at an ecosystem level, focusing specifically on the micro and meso levels. This study is performed in a retail ecosystem, a highly relevant context where individuals spend a considerable amount of time and resources, but where well-being is usually not deemed as a relevant outcome.

Design/methodology/approach

The investigation analyzes qualitative data from micro and meso level actors of a retail ecosystem. At the micro-level, in-depth interviews performed with customers, employees and suppliers were assessed. The meso level analysis included most of the actors embedded in the retail ecosystem: employees’ headquarters, suppliers’ headquarters, nearby competitors, family, other retail outlets and external employees.

Findings

This study is one of the first in the transformative service research area to analyze well-being from a retail ecosystem perspective. Hence, this analysis broadens the literature on transformative service by considering supermarket retailing, an everyday service context that is not assumed to generate well-being outcomes. Results reveal that actors who spend more time or have fewer options available for them in the retail ecosystem see their well-being deeply affected. It also extends the conceptualization of value co-creation to a retail ecosystem, a specific ecosystem, which differs from previous studies that focus mostly on health-care ecosystems.

Research limitations/implications

Although useful to understand new insights, a limitation of this investigation is that it is based upon a single qualitative study.

Practical implications

The study portrays how activities happening within a business context have consequences beyond traditional measures such as loyalty or turn-over. It proposes specific value co-creation actions to be performed by employees, suppliers and customers to promote positive well-being consequences for the micro and meso level retail ecosystem.

Social implications

Retail ecosystems are usually not deemed as relevant when trying to understand societal well-being outcomes. This study empirically depicts that all services, even the ones without transformative goals, need to be aware of the impact they have on societal well-being.

Originality/value

This paper provides a novel conceptualization of well-being effects in a retail ecosystem. Specifically, this is the first study in the transformative service research literature to identify the micro and meso level well-being consequences of value co-creation activities within a retail ecosystem.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 June 2021

Diego Alex Gazaro dos Santos, Aurora Zen and Bruno Anicet Bittencourt

Innovation ecosystems can emerge and grow organically, but the process can also be managed through conscious intervention. Therefore, this study observes different…

Abstract

Purpose

Innovation ecosystems can emerge and grow organically, but the process can also be managed through conscious intervention. Therefore, this study observes different motivations and expectations for each group of actors. The lack of alignment between actors could have a negative influence on the development of innovation ecosystems. This study aims to analyze the coordination strategies of the actors throughout the life cycle of innovation ecosystems.

Design/methodology/approach

This study develops and proposes a model for coordinating innovation ecosystems based on the theoretical backgrounds of the ecosystem life cycle and ecosystem coordination.

Findings

This study argues that each stage of an innovation ecosystem’s life cycle – inception, launching, growth and maturity – demands different coordination strategies. Initially, networks are simpler and thus the coordination issues are less difficult. However, as the ecosystem evolves and the complexity of the networks increases, a more sophisticated strategy, such as orchestration or choreography, is needed.

Research limitations/implications

This is a theoretical study that recommends further research to test this model.

Practical implications

The understanding of coordination and stages of the life cycle of an innovation ecosystem can guide actors in the design of strategies for developing of ecosystems.

Social implications

The proposed framework could support strategies to engage civil society in actions to develop innovation ecosystems.

Originality/value

This study presents a framework to understand the coordination strategies better, considering the stages of an innovation ecosystem’s life cycle.

Details

Innovation & Management Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2515-8961

Keywords

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