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Book part
Publication date: 25 August 2014

Aishath Muneeza

This chapter aims to explore the Shari’ah governance rules applied in the Malaysian Islamic banking arena and the effect of Islamic Financial Services Act 2013 on it.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter aims to explore the Shari’ah governance rules applied in the Malaysian Islamic banking arena and the effect of Islamic Financial Services Act 2013 on it.

Design/Methodology/Approach

This is a legal exploratory study primarily focused on library research.

Findings

Shari’ah governance is a concept that has been developed and applied gradually in Malaysia and the new Islamic Financial Services Act 2013 has taken it to the next level. However, this does not mean that it has resolved the problems in Shari’ah governance that existed before the enactment of the act.

Originality/Value

Islamic Financial Services Act 2013 is a new statute that repealed Islamic Banking Act 1983. As such, not many have reviewed this new piece of legislation. This chapter will give insight into the evolution of Shari’ah governance as part of corporate governance of Islamic banks in Malaysia and will help explain the most recent developments in this arena along with the challenges.

Details

The Developing Role of Islamic Banking and Finance: From Local to Global Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-817-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 20 May 2019

Noor Suhaida Kasri

This chapter explores the historical development of shari’ah governance infrastructures in the Malaysian landscape, pre- and post-Islamic Financial Services Act 2013…

Abstract

This chapter explores the historical development of shari’ah governance infrastructures in the Malaysian landscape, pre- and post-Islamic Financial Services Act 2013 (IFSA) and its implications on the industry. This chapter analyzed two approaches developed in the shari’ah governance, namely, the inclusivity and uniformity approach. Inclusivity approach showed that the shari’ah compliance responsibility is shared inclusively by the shari’ah committee together with the institution’s top management. While the uniformity approach showed that the end-to-end shari’ah compliance is achieved through issuance of shari’ah standards that can be easily related by the practitioners into their banking operations and business. The coherence implementation of these approaches has enabled another important stakeholder, the judiciary to have more clarity and certainty in dealing with matters pertaining to Islamic banking and finance. Consumers’ trust and confidence in the financial sector is thereby secured and sustained, hence providing financial stability within the industry, which meets with the expectation and mandate given to IFSA.

Details

Research in Corporate and Shari’ah Governance in the Muslim World: Theory and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-007-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 January 2022

Peterson K. Ozili

Purpose: Pandemics lead to a sudden decline in the level of economic activities. Lending institutions reduce credit supply to businesses due to fears of rising bad debts…

Abstract

Purpose: Pandemics lead to a sudden decline in the level of economic activities. Lending institutions reduce credit supply to businesses due to fears of rising bad debts during a pandemic. This chapter highlights some approach to financial regulation and bank supervision during a pandemic such as the SARS and COVID-19 pandemic.

Methodology: This chapter uses discourse analysis based on the literature on banking regulation and supervision.

Findings: The author shows that financial regulation during a pandemic can be enhanced by diversifying the financial system, maintaining adequate liquidity in the financial system, stimulating financial institutions to provide more credit, delaying the recognition of significant increase in credit risk, lowering the reference interest rate to encourage more lending, and providing stimulus packages to financial institutions in the economy. The author also suggest measures to improve bank supervision during a pandemic which include adopting a flexible supervisory framework, modifying bank supervisory examinations, using ad hoc stress tests, releasing the countercyclical capital buffer to banks, and increase the use of regulatory forbearance.

Implications: The implication of these approaches to coping with a pandemic is that these measures can help to ensure the survival of small and large businesses and financial institutions. It can also help to preserve jobs and help to reduce the long-term damage to the economy caused by the pandemic.

Originality: Prior studies have not examined the effect of COVID-19 pandemic on bank supervision and financial regulation.

Details

Insurance and Risk Management for Disruptions in Social, Economic and Environmental Systems: Decision and Control Allocations within New Domains of Risk
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-140-3

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Issues and Challenges in the Malaysian Economy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-482-3

Abstract

Details

Emotional Appeals in Advertising Banking Services
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-302-5

Book part
Publication date: 2 September 2019

B. Janakiraman

Low interest rates around the world due to adaptive monetary policy regulations for some time a source of concern for the banking sector and depositors of the bank. In…

Abstract

Low interest rates around the world due to adaptive monetary policy regulations for some time a source of concern for the banking sector and depositors of the bank. In this environment, interest rates have raised concerns about nominal deposit interest rates which cannot be lowered below zero without destroying bank customers. Bank loans are becoming less vulnerable to lower interest rates on deposits approaching zero, indicating that the financial channel is weakened when interest rates are close to zero. Demographic pressures associated with longer life expectancy, China's gradual integration into global financial markets and changes in supply and asset requirements are attributed as reasons for low interest rates. Volatility of CPI inflation, interest rates on bank deposits attracting income tax and discontented depositors due to lower rates are cited as reasons for the suffering of bank depositors. This chapter thus discusses the impact of negative rate on economic growth and bank customers besides discussing the future trends of negative interest rates.

Details

The Impacts of Monetary Policy in the 21st Century: Perspectives from Emerging Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-319-8

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2010

Suk-Joong Kim and Michael D. McKenzie

International banking refers to the activities of providing financial services (banking) to clients (both institutional and individual) located in many different…

Abstract

International banking refers to the activities of providing financial services (banking) to clients (both institutional and individual) located in many different countries. This encompasses a wide range of activities, including transactions with foreigners and domestic residents relating to deposits and lending in domestic and foreign currencies, facilitating foreign currency transactions and foreign exchange risk hedging, participating in international loan syndications, and facilitating international trade finance for clients.

Details

International Banking in the New Era: Post-Crisis Challenges and Opportunities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-913-8

Book part
Publication date: 29 December 2016

Denis Davydov and Steve Swidler

The analysis considers the use of Benford’s Law as a forensic tool to audit the quality of accounting information reported by banks in emerging market countries. History…

Abstract

The analysis considers the use of Benford’s Law as a forensic tool to audit the quality of accounting information reported by banks in emerging market countries. History suggests that lack of financial standards and reporting transparency can ultimately lead to bank failures in these nations. We use the Benford Distribution to analyze the first digits of bank financial statement entries and show the value of accounting standards in producing information of high quality. Benford’s Law maintains that the first digits of an unconstrained, large array of numbers might follow a lognormal pattern. It can be applied, for example, to financial statements issued by banks to infer their data integrity. To illustrate the importance of accounting standards and reporting transparency, the analysis utilizes Russian bank statement data from 2001 to 2011. The main finding is that accounting standards matter. After the Russian Central Bank required all banks to adopt International Financial Reporting Standards in 2004, the financial statement data largely conformed to Benford’s Law. While the Benford distribution can be used to infer the overall quality of bank financial statement data in emerging market countries, it is less effective in spotting troubled banks that commit reporting fraud. One possible reason is that the Benford distribution is scale invariant, and violation of Benford’s Law is a sufficient but not necessary condition for accounting irregularities.

Book part
Publication date: 21 May 2021

Peterson K. Ozili

Purpose: This chapter discusses the need for climate change risk mitigation and why it is not the responsibility of Central Banks to mitigate climate change risk.…

Abstract

Purpose: This chapter discusses the need for climate change risk mitigation and why it is not the responsibility of Central Banks to mitigate climate change risk.

Methodology: This chapter uses critical discourse analysis to explain why central banks should not have the responsibility for climate change risk mitigation.

Findings: This chapter argues that the responsibility for managing climate change risk should lie with elected officials, other groups and institutions but not Central Banks. Elected officials, or politicians, should be held responsible to deal with the consequence of climate change events. Also, international organizations and everybody can take responsibility for climate change while the Central Bank can provide assistance – but Central Banks should not lead the climate policy making or mitigation agenda.

Implication: The policy implication is that the responsibility for climate change risk mitigation should be shifted to politicians who are elected officials of the people. Also, international climate change organizations or groups can take responsibility for mitigating the climate change risk of member countries. Finally, citizens in a country or region should have equal responsibility for climate change. Climate information should be provided to every citizen to help them prepare for future climatic conditions.

Originality: This chapter propagates the idea that Central Banks should take a lead role in dealing with the problems of climate change. This chapter is the first chapter to contest a Central Bank-led climate change risk mitigation agenda.

Abstract

Details

The Banking Sector Under Financial Stability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-681-5

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