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1 – 10 of over 22000
Article
Publication date: 8 September 2022

Piotr Bialowolski, Andrzej Cwynar and Dorota Weziak-Bialowolska

Preserving sufficient financial assets is crucial for maintaining the standard of living. The lack of adequate financial cushion can translate into financial hardship at…

Abstract

Purpose

Preserving sufficient financial assets is crucial for maintaining the standard of living. The lack of adequate financial cushion can translate into financial hardship at any age, but its effects can be especially severe in later adulthood. The authors evaluate whether financial literacy can prevent individuals from depleting the stock of liquid financial assets below a predefined minimum level.

Design/methodology/approach

Defining financial resilience as the ability to maintain the value of household savings above the level of 3-monthly incomes, the authors examined whether financial literacy is (1) prospectively associated with the probability of losing financial resilience and (2) the probability of gaining financial resilience among financially vulnerable middle-aged and older adults. To this end, the authors applied the multivariate Cox proportional hazards model with time-varying covariates. Data were retrieved from the Survey of Health, Aging and Retirement in Europe with the sample comprising 13,718 adults aged ≥ 50 years in (1) and 12,802 in (2).

Findings

The authors show that financial literacy plays a protective role for financial resilience. Its role is not symmetrical and protects more against the loss of financial resilience than it contributes to the gain of financial resilience. Among individuals aged 65–74, the association between financial literacy and financial resilience is weaker than among adults in the middle-age (50–64) and among the oldest (75+).

Social implications

Fostering financial literacy can be important to help middle-aged and older adults maintain a good quality of life and favorable living standards.

Originality/value

Given the scarce evidence on the links between financial literacy and financial resilience among middle-aged and older adults, the article contributes to the literature by examining whether financial literacy retains its protective role in later stages of the life course.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Stephanie Douglas

This paper examines the role of human capital management strategy in shaping organizational resilience. Resilient organizations thrive in uncertain and adverse conditions…

1223

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the role of human capital management strategy in shaping organizational resilience. Resilient organizations thrive in uncertain and adverse conditions. The organization’s capacity for resilience can be developed through human capital management strategies that are focused on employee capabilities, training, and development. When individual capabilities and resilience are developed, those can be aggregated at an organizational level to develop the capacity in an organization for resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of relevant studies and literature was conducted to develop strategies and insight into developing the human capital of an organization to support organizational resilience.

Findings

Supporting individual capability development and resilience builds the organization’s capacity for resilience. By shifting human capital management strategies to building capabilities and then skills, organizations develop individual resilience and then organizational resilience. The implications of how to build such human capital management strategies are presented.

Originality/value

This paper provides support and guidelines for building individual capability and resilience to enhance an organization’s resilience.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 September 2022

Naila Fares, Jaime Lloret, Vikas Kumar, Guilherme F. Frederico, Anil Kumar and Jose Arturo Garza-Reyes

This study aims to analyse the resilience of customer demand management post-coronavirus disease 2019, using fast fashion as an example. The paper provides insights for…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyse the resilience of customer demand management post-coronavirus disease 2019, using fast fashion as an example. The paper provides insights for potential applications to micro-, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the qualitative analysis and an integrated Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA)-decision making trial and evaluation laboratory (DEMATEL)-fuzzy technique for order of preference by similarity to the ideal solution (TOPSIS) methodology of fuzzy multi-criteria decision-making, we explored and prioritised the enablers of resilience management for fast-fashion MSMEs.

Findings

The results reveal that the highest priority enabler is maintaining customer loyalty. Other enablers are associated with e-commerce endorsement, a customer-focussed assortment of items and flexible store operations.

Research limitations/implications

The study findings will enable fast-fashion MSMEs to develop effective actions and priorities in operations efforts to promote post-pandemic recovery.

Originality/value

Despite the importance of the resilience project and the changing fast-fashion customer patterns, only a handful of studies have explored how resilience can be managed in this field. Thus, the findings can contribute to closing this gap in the context of operations resilience research as well as MSME operations.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2022

Noa Nelson, Raphaele Fuchs and Mayan Kurtz-Cohen

Work–family conflict (WFC) is a chronic source of stress, threatening contemporary organizations. Employees' own characteristics, which have received limited scientific…

Abstract

Purpose

Work–family conflict (WFC) is a chronic source of stress, threatening contemporary organizations. Employees' own characteristics, which have received limited scientific attention, can help mitigate WFC. The current two studies tested, for the first time, the links of higher-order trait resilience models to WFC, while exploring possible mediators and differentiating the contributions of interpersonal vs. intrapersonal resilient traits.

Design/methodology/approach

In study 1, the authors tested a mediation model in which trait negotiation resilience (TNR), which is oriented toward challenges that involve balancing conflicting needs with others, predicted multidimensional (time, strain and behavior based) WFC, through three mediators: emotion regulation (intrapersonal), self-monitoring and work–family balance negotiation (both interpersonally oriented). In study 2, both TNR and the more intrapersonal Connor–Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) were associated with a global, more parsimonious measurement of WFC. Additionally, TNR's factors were separately correlated with the latter.

Findings

TNR associated with lower multidimensional WFC through emotion regulation, which partly mediated TNR's effect; and through self-monitoring, which suppressed TNR's effect because it related to higher WFC (balance negotiation had no effect). In study 2, CD-RISC, but not TNR, related to lower global WFC. Additionally, two intrapersonal TNR factors tended to relate to lower WFC, while one interpersonal factor related to higher WFC.

Originality/value

The studies demonstrate the role of higher-order trait resilience in WFC, while fine-tuning understanding of the contributions of intrapersonal vs. interpersonal resilience. The findings may be relevant to other organizational challenges, beyond WFC, and inform employee recruitment and training.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2022

C. Michael Hall, Alexander Safonov and Sarah Naderi Koupaei

This paper aims to identify research approaches and issues in relation to the main paradigms of resilience: engineering resilience, ecological resilience and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify research approaches and issues in relation to the main paradigms of resilience: engineering resilience, ecological resilience and socio-ecological resilience. This paper provides a synthesis of the core elements of each resilience approach and their implications.

Design/methodology/approach

A critical thematic review was undertaken of the hospitality and tourism resilience literature.

Findings

Resilience is a contested boundary object with different understandings according to conceptual and disciplinary position. The dominant approach in hospitality and tourism studies is primarily informed by engineering resilience with the focus at the organizational level. The ontological and epistemological understanding of resilience and change concepts appears limited leading to a lack of appreciation of the multi-scaled nature of resilience and the importance of slow change.

Research/limitations/implications

The research has important implications for understanding the key elements of different approaches to resilience.

Practical implications

The research synthesis may help improve resilience strategy and policymaking, including indicator selection.

Social implications

The research notes the relationship of resilience to sustainability, the potential for learning and decision-making practices.

Originality/value

In addition to thematic analysis, a model of the multi-scaled nature of resilience is provided and the key elements of the three main approaches with implications for theory and practice.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 September 2022

Mengye Yu, Jie Wen, Simon M. Smith and Peter Stokes

Psychological resilience, defined here as the capacity to bounce back from adversity and failure, has been studied in various leadership contexts. However, the literature…

Abstract

Purpose

Psychological resilience, defined here as the capacity to bounce back from adversity and failure, has been studied in various leadership contexts. However, the literature demonstrates less consensus concerning how psychological resilience manifests in, and interacts within, the leadership role and, equally, the focus on resilience development is underdeveloped. This paper addresses these issues by focusing on the interactions between psychological resilience and leadership and presents practical development strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review employing 46 empirical studies followed a thematic synthesis within an associated model encapsulated as building-up resilience and being effective.

Findings

First, resilience is identified as essential and can benefit individuals and organizations' work outcomes across leadership contexts, including work performance, job engagement, well-being, and enhanced leadership capability. Secondly, leaders may build up their resilience by obtaining coping skills and improved attitudes toward challenges. Resilient attitudes, which are presented as paradoxical perspectives towards challenges, may help leaders adapt to challenges and adversities leading to beneficial outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

Even though this study provides a deeper understanding of the essential function of psychological resilience in leadership, the findings are limited to the workplace contexts investigated, e.g. exploring small sample sizes (13,019) or country contexts (22). Future research could expand the rhetoric around interactions between psychological resilience and leadership. Furthermore, the underlining mechanism between the paradoxical perspective and resilient attitudes is still largely unclear. Thus, more research is needed to disclose the interaction of paradoxical perceptions and leadership resilience. Further research can investigate how resilient attitudes demonstrate in actions in dealing with challenges and adversities.

Practical implications

The authors further an argument that leaders may enhance their resilience through embracing a paradoxical perspective towards challenges (resilient attitude), e.g. being adaptive to adversities, and the attitude of learning from failures. These enhanced resilient attitudes could help leaders deeper understand and examine their reality and persist under high pressures and develop an innate ability to utilise resources more effectively to help them survive and thrive in challenging circumstances, instead of becoming overwhelmed by the burden of complexity or giving up. This will offer a practical contribution to resilience development.

Social implications

Importantly, this study found that resilience is an essential leadership trait and can benefit individuals and organizations' work outcomes across leadership contexts. These positive effects of resilience may encourage organizations or society to promote psychological resilience, including a resilient attitude, to deal with adversities and uncertainties.

Originality/value

Fundamentally, the synthesized model applied may encourage further studies to focus on how to build up resilience and practically apply it in workplaces across leadership contexts. In particular, this study found that adopting paradoxical perspectives and ambidextrous leadership approaches toward adversities is an original resilience development strategy, which serves to contribute to the gap in the literature.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 September 2022

Sophia Su, Kevin Baird and Rahat Munir

This study examines the influence of organisational culture on organisational resilience from an organisational life cycle (OLC) perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the influence of organisational culture on organisational resilience from an organisational life cycle (OLC) perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey questionnaire was used to collect data from 410 middle-level managers in Australian business organisations using Qualtrics, a well-known international data collection organisation.

Findings

The findings reveal that the respect for people/teamwork cultural dimension is positively associated with organisational resilience across all OLC stages (i.e. birth, growth, maturity and revival stages). In addition, the outcome-oriented (innovation) culture dimension enhance organisational resilience in the growth and revival (maturity) stages.

Originality/value

The findings contribute to the limited literature by providing empirical evidence on how specific organisational cultural dimensions can enhance organisational resilience across different development stages of organisations (i.e. the birth, growth, maturity and revival stages).

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 September 2022

Gianluca Pescaroli, Kristen Guida, Jeremy Reynolds, Roger S. Pulwarty, Igor Linkov and David E. Alexander

This paper applies the theory of cascading, interconnected and compound risk to the practice of preparing for, managing, and responding to threats and hazards. Our goal is…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper applies the theory of cascading, interconnected and compound risk to the practice of preparing for, managing, and responding to threats and hazards. Our goal is to propose a consistent approach for managing major risk in urban systems by bringing together emergency management, organisational resilience, and climate change adaptation.

Design/methodology/approach

We develop a theory-building process using an example from the work of the Greater London Authority in the United Kingdom. First, we explore how emergency management approaches systemic risk, including examples from of exercises, contingency plans and responses to complex incidents. Secondly, we analyse how systemic risk is integrated into strategies and practices of climate change adaptation. Thirdly, we consider organisational resilience as a cross cutting element between the approaches.

Findings

London has long been a champion of resilience strategies for dealing with systemic risk. However, this paper highlights a potential for integrating better the understanding of common points of failure in society and organisations, especially where they relate to interconnected domains and where they are driven by climate change.

Originality/value

The paper suggests shifting toward the concept of operational continuity to address systemic risk and gaps between Emergency Management, Organizational Resilience and Climate Change Adaptation.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 September 2022

S.M. Aparna and Sangeeta Sahney

The paper aims to highlight the understated role of creativity in R&D organizations by exploring the effect of creativity-oriented high-performance work practices (CHPWPs…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to highlight the understated role of creativity in R&D organizations by exploring the effect of creativity-oriented high-performance work practices (CHPWPs) on resilience. The moderator effect of role clarity (RC) on the association between CHPWPs and resilience is examined.

Design/methodology/approach

The study proposes a simple moderation model to understand the relationship, and specifically hierarchical regression analysis (SPSS 22.0) and SPSS PROCESS Macro has been used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Findings revealed that the implementation of CHPWPs would significantly improve resilience. The benefits of CHPWPs on resilience get compromised as the organizations lay stress on higher levels of RC.

Practical implications

Indian R&D organizations must emphasize upon enhancing resilience through a set of CHPWPs. Rather than laying greater stress on RC, these organizations should build a creative climate characterized by experimentation, freedom and a free flow of ideas.

Originality/value

The current study makes a valuable contribution by highlighting the importance of creativity and resilience in organizations. Although conceptual studies highlight the importance of creativity in R&D organizations, this has been was greatly neglected. The current study adds value to the existing literature by deepening the authors’ understanding of the role of CHPWPs in enhancing resilience, the latter being a subject of huge focus of organizations during the pandemic.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2022

Udara Sachinthana Perera, Chandana Siriwardana and Ishani Shehara Pitigala Liyana Arachchi

Infrastructures become critical with the emerging threats triggering through disasters. Sri Lanka is a country with a higher risk of disaster impacts, in which the…

Abstract

Purpose

Infrastructures become critical with the emerging threats triggering through disasters. Sri Lanka is a country with a higher risk of disaster impacts, in which the eye-opening has widened towards mitigating the damages towards critical infrastructures. Based on this, the purpose of this paper is to develop an index that identifies the significance of critical infrastructure resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

From the initial literature survey, disaster resilience is defined as capacity of three stages, absorptive, adaptive and restorative along with ten indicators to measure capacities. Selected indicators were then checked for suitability for scope of the research based on opinions of seven experts. Subsequently, the critical infrastructure resilience index (CIRI) was introduced such that the numerical values for each indicator are aggregated using the Z score method. Statistical relations between the actual impact against disasters and CIRI calculated for administrative regions in Sri Lanka were used as the final step to validate the developed index.

Findings

Resilience index development is presented in this paper with a comprehensive methodology of developing and validation. Further, the case study results imply the weakness and strengths in each resilience capacities, which are important in decision-making.

Research limitations/implications

Unavailability of disaster impact data and centralized data repository were main constrains in the validation process of this research. Hence proxy data was used to validate resilience index in this research.

Originality/value

This research identified and validated a novel approach of defining disaster resilience index for regional decision-making.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

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