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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Widodo Widodo, Pradiptya Ayu Harsita, Ari Surya Sukarno and Arief Nurrochmad

Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disease that accounted for 6 per cent of total Indonesian deaths in 2016. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of milk…

Abstract

Purpose

Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disease that accounted for 6 per cent of total Indonesian deaths in 2016. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of milk fermented using intestinal origin Lactobacillus casei strains to alleviate hyperglycemia in rats.

Design/methodology/approach

L. casei strains AP and AG were previously isolated and identified from feces of breastfed Indonesian infants (<1 month-old) and confirmed to be probiotics in vitro. These strains were used as bacterial starters to ferment milk, and the fermented product was fed to 25 diabetic rats for 15 days; metformin was used as a positive control. Blood glucose concentration, lipid profiles and total lactic acid bacteria counts were analyzed before and after treatment.

Findings

The results showed that feeding rats with milk fermented using L. casei strain AP decreased blood glucose concentration from 172.4 ± 2.1 to 147.2 ± 6.0 mg/dL (p < 0.05), whereas metformin reduced blood glucose concentration from 173.5 ± 6.5 to 124.2 ± 16.9 mg/dL (p < 0.05). Feeding milk fermented either L. casei AP or AG decreased low density lipoprotein but increased high density lipoprotein levels (p < 0.05).

Research limitations/implications

This research finding is expected to increase the development of fermented dairy products as functional food, solutions for the prevention of hyperglycemia diseases which have a higher risk to occur on humans.

Practical implications

Further study is needed to examine the effect of L. casei AP-fermented milk on humans with hyperglycemia.

Social implications

This research finding is expected to increase the development of fermented dairy products as functional food.

Originality/value

Oral administration of L. casei AP-fermented milk reduced hyperglycemia in rats similar to metformin. Further study is needed to examine the effect of L. casei AP-fermented milk on humans with hyperglycemia.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 49 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 11 August 2020

Chanita Tantipoj, Natchalee Srimaneekarn, Sirirak Supa-amornkul, Vitool Lohsoonthorn, Narin Hiransuthikul, Weerapan Khovidhunkit and Siribang-on Piboonniyom Khovidhunkit

To construct a risk score using both clinical and intra-oral variables and to determine a risk score to screen individuals according to their risk of hyperglycemia.

Abstract

Purpose

To construct a risk score using both clinical and intra-oral variables and to determine a risk score to screen individuals according to their risk of hyperglycemia.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional study was carried out among 690 Thai dental patients who visited the Special Clinic, Faculty of Dentistry, Mahidol University and a mobile dental unit of His Majesty the King of Thailandss Dental Service Unit. Participants aged ≥25 years without a previous history of type 2 diabetes mellitus were included in the study. Participants diagnosed with severe anemia and polycythemia were excluded. Questionnaires were used to collect demographic data. Point-of-care HbA1c, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure and periodontal status were analyzed.

Findings

A total of 690 participants were included in the study. A risk scoring system including five variables was developed. It exhibited fair discrimination (area under the curve = 0.72, 95%CI 0.68–0.71). The risk score value of 9 was used as the cut-off point for increased risk of abnormal HbA1c. Subjects that had a total risk score of 9 or more had a high probability of having abnormal HbA1c and were identified for referral to physicians for further investigation and diagnosis.

Originality/value

A risk score to predict hyperglycemia using a dental parameter was developed for convenient evaluation in dental clinics.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 November 2021

Mohamed Tiss, Zoubeida Souiy, Lotfi Achour and Khaled Hamden

This study paper aims to evaluate the Phytochemical Composition, anti-obesity, anti-antipyretic and analgesic effect of Ephedra alata (Ea) extracts.

Abstract

Purpose

This study paper aims to evaluate the Phytochemical Composition, anti-obesity, anti-antipyretic and analgesic effect of Ephedra alata (Ea) extracts.

Design/methodology/approach

Obesity was induced in male Wistar rats through a high-fat/fructose diet (HF/FD). Control rats received a standard diet.

Findings

Results of this study showed that the Ea methanol extract (MEEa) exhibited a prominent selective inhibitory effect against lipase activity (IC50 = 1.29 mg/ml) as compared to water and ethyl acetate extracts (with IC50 = 1.63 and 1.89, respectively). Also, MEEa exert antipyretic and analgesic activities. In high-fat-high-fructose diet rats, the administration of MEEa inhibited lipase activity in the intestine, pancreas and serum by 53%, 40% and 53%, respectively. It was found to significantly decrease body weight by 20% (p = 0.09) and delay the absorption of triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) and increase HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C). In addition, MEEa efficiently decreased a-amylase activity in the intestine, pancreas and serum by 43%, 26% and 46%, respectively, and blood glucose level by 35% (p = 0.06).

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study demonstrates for the first time that MEEa are efficient in preventing obesity and hyperglycemia, pain and fever.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 52 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2021

Saira Tanweer, Tariq Mehmood, Saadia Zainab, Zulfiqar Ahmad, Muhammad Ammar Khan, Aamir Shehzad, Adnan Khaliq, Farhan Jahangir Chughtai and Atif Liaqat

Innovative health-promoting approaches of the era have verified phytoceutics as one of the prime therapeutic tools to alleviate numerous health-related ailments. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Innovative health-promoting approaches of the era have verified phytoceutics as one of the prime therapeutic tools to alleviate numerous health-related ailments. The purpose of this paper is to probe the nutraceutic potential of ginger flowers and leaves against hyperglycemia.

Design/methodology/approach

The aqueous extracts of ginger flowers and leaves were observed on Sprague Dawley rats for 8 weeks. Two parallel studies were carried out based on dietary regimes: control and hyperglycemic diets. At the end of the experimental modus, the overnight fed rats were killed to determine the concentration of glucose and insulin in serum. The insulin resistance and insulin secretions were also calculated by formulae by considering fasting glucose and fasting insulin concentrations. Furthermore, the feed and drink intakes, body weight gain and hematological analysis were also carried out.

Findings

In streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemic rats, the ginger flowers extract depicted 5.62% reduction; however, ginger leaves extract reduced the glucose concentration up to 7.11% (p = 0.001). Similarly, ginger flowers extract uplifted the insulin concentration up to 3.07%, while, by ginger leaves extract, the insulin value increased to 4.11% (p = 0.002). For the insulin resistance, the ginger flower showed 5.32% decrease; however, the insulin resistance was reduced to 6.48% by ginger leaves (p = 0.014). Moreover, the insulin secretion increased to 18.9% by flower extract and 21.8% by ginger leave extract (p = 0.001). The feed intake and body weight gain increased momentously by the addition of ginger flowers and leaves; however, the drink intake and hematological analysis remained non-significant by the addition of ginger parts.

Originality/value

Conclusively, it was revealed that leaves have more hypoglycemic potential as compared to flowers.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 52 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 August 2019

Reny Marlina, Binar Panunggal and Gemala Anjani

Hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus increases inflammation through pancreatic beta-cell destruction. Goat milk (kefir) and vitamin D3 have antioxidant and…

Abstract

Purpose

Hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus increases inflammation through pancreatic beta-cell destruction. Goat milk (kefir) and vitamin D3 have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that can reduce pancreatic beta cells. Increase in total leukocyte count is one of the inflammatory and complication markers of diabetes. This study aims to analyze the effect of fermented goat milk (kefir) fortified with vitamin D3 on total leukocyte counts in diabetic brown rat (Rattus norvegicus).

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental design with pre- and post-test methodology of control and experimental groups was used. A total of 24 male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: negative control (K−), positive control (K+), kefir treatment (P1) and kefir fortified with vitamin D3 treatment (P2). The control group consisted of healthy rats; the other groups consisted of rats which were given streptozotocin–nicotinamide injections. Before and after intervention, fasting blood glucose levels and total leukocytes counts were measured. Blood glucose levels were analyzed using the GOD–PAP method and leukocyte counts were analyzed using an automatic hematological analyzer.

Findings

There was a significant decrease in total leukocyte counts in the P2 group (from 26.5 ± 7.7 to 20.4 ± 10.4 [p < 0.05]). However, the decrease in leukocyte count in theP1 group was not significant (from 22.1 ± 9.3 to 16.5 ± 6.2). The decrease in blood glucose levels in theP2 group was −81.4 ± 203.0 but not significant.

Originality/value

Kefir with vitamin D3 fortification can significantly reduce total leukocyte counts in diabetes.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 August 2020

Yasmina Bahlil, Djamil Krouf, Zoheir Mellouk, Nawal Taleb-Dida and Akila Guenzet

This study aims to examine whether Globularia alypum (Ga) lyophilized aqueous leaves extract treatment improves cardiometabolic syndromes such as hyperglycemia, lipid…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine whether Globularia alypum (Ga) lyophilized aqueous leaves extract treatment improves cardiometabolic syndromes such as hyperglycemia, lipid profiles and oxidative damage resulting from a high-fructose diet induced in hypertriglyceridemic rats.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 24 male Wistar rats weighing 80 ± 5 g were first randomly divided into 2 groups. A total of 12 control rats (C) were fed a standard-diet (St-D) and 12 high fructose (HF) rats were fed a high-fructose diet (HF-D) containing St-D in which cornstarch was substituted by fructose (61.4%). After 15 weeks of feeding, body weight (BW) was about 320 ± 20 g and hypertriglyceridemia was noted in HF vs C group (2.69 ± 0.49 mmol/L) vs (1.25 ± 0.33 mmol/L). Each group of rats was then divided into two equal groups (n = 6) and fed during four weeks either a St-D or HF-D, treated or not with 1% of Ga extract (C-Ga) and (HF-Ga). After 28 days, fasting rats were anesthetized and blood and tissues were removed to measure biochemical parameters.

Findings

The results showed no significant differences in BW and insulinemia between all groups. Ga extract supplementation reduced glycemia (−36%), glycosylated hemoglobin (−37%), Homeostasis Model of Assessment-Insulin Resistance index (−34%) and triacylglycerol’s contents in plasma (−33%), very low density lipoproteins–low density lipoproteins (VLDL-LDL) (−48%), liver (−52%) and aorta (−39%); total cholesterol concentrations in aorta was 3.7-fold lower in HF-Ga vs HF group. Ga treatment reduced lipid peroxidation in plasma, VLDL-LDL, red blood cells (RBC), liver, muscle and kidney by improving superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in RBC and catalase (CAT) activity in kidney (p < 0.05). Moreover, Ga ameliorates glutathione (GSH) production in RBC (+41%) and kidney tissues (+35%).

Originality/value

Ga extract ameliorated cardiometabolic syndrome by its hypotriglyceridemic effect and prevented development of insulin resistance. It reduces lipid peroxidation by enhancing non-enzymatic (GSH) and enzymatic (SOD, GPx and CAT) antioxidant defense systems in high-fructose hypertriglyceridemic rats. Therefore, supplementation of Ga leaves extract as an adjuvant could be used for the treatment of hypertriglyceridemia and the prevention and/or the management of cardio-metabolic adverse effects.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 51 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Ishawu Iddrisu, Ibok Oduro, Marina Aferiba Tandoh and Reginald Adjetey Annan

The purpose of this paper was to synthesis all primary evidence relevant to the anti-diabetic effect of dandelion. Dandelion leaf and root have been used extensively for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to synthesis all primary evidence relevant to the anti-diabetic effect of dandelion. Dandelion leaf and root have been used extensively for its medicinal and health benefits since hundreds of years ago. This systematic review was conducted to gather scientific evidence that are available with regards to the anti-diabetic effect of dandelion leaf and root.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic search was conducted using PubMed, BioMed, PLUSONE and Cochrane databases between June 6, 2013 and June 30, 2013. Manual search was also done on books and journals in the KNUST library and its electronic database for possible documented effects of dandelion leaf or root on diabetic patients. Key words “dandelion”, “Taraxacum”, “dandelion and diabetes”, “Taraxacum officinale”, “Taraxacum and diabetes”, “dandelion and hypoglycemia” and “dandelion and hyperglycemia” were used in the search.

Findings

The search yielded 713 papers, and after the removal of duplicates and papers not relevant to this review, 20 papers were accepted for the review. These included studies conducted in humans and animals (rats and mice). Among the 20 studies reviewed, only 1 study examined and reported a positive hypoglycemic effect of dandelion on diabetic rats.

Research limitations/implications

The review only considered published papers and might have left out some unpublished research works.

Practical implications

The results of this review suggest paucity of data available on the use of dandelion in the treatment/management of diabetes. There is the need for well-designed clinical trials to ascertain the anti-diabetic effect of dandelion.

Social implications

The consumption of dandelion by type 2 diabetic patients to treat or manage their blood glucose has not been clinically proven to be effective, as shown by the review.

Originality/value

The paper provides a clear picture of the evidence available in the use of dandelion as an anti-diabetic herb, and this provides some preliminary data for the conduct of a clinical research on it.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2018

Giada Danesi, Mélody Pralong and Vincent Pidoux

Drawing on ethnographic observations of diabetes (self-)management in French-speaking Switzerland and semi-structured interviews with healthcare practitioners, people…

Abstract

Drawing on ethnographic observations of diabetes (self-)management in French-speaking Switzerland and semi-structured interviews with healthcare practitioners, people living with diabetes and their relatives, the chapter aims at shedding light on self-tracking practices of people living with diabetes. It explores the ways people with diabetes measure and learn to recognise body symptoms of hypo- and hyperglycaemia through self-quantification, and act consequently. In particular, the chapter investigates recent medical devices – continuous and flash glucose monitoring systems – that reconfigure the work of health providers and self-care practices. It shows the self-monitoring practices and the resulting self-awareness people living with diabetes develop in interaction with technology and caregivers in order to undertake embodied actions. By pointing out that new technologies have facilitated the access to personal body information and the sharing of it, self-monitoring is also questioned as a form of surveillance, opening up issues of power and control over patients’ behaviours. With regard to this, the chapter illustrates that, occasionally, people with diabetes resist ‘docility’ through micro-powers at the level of everyday life by refusing to engage in their use and by developing personal strategies or ‘tactics’.

Details

Metric Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-289-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1990

Azmina Govindji

Diabetes mellitus is a condition in which the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood is too high. Blood glucose is normally carefully controlled by a hormone, insulin…

Abstract

Diabetes mellitus is a condition in which the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood is too high. Blood glucose is normally carefully controlled by a hormone, insulin, which is secreted from the pancreas gland. If there is insufficient or ineffective insulin in the body (as in diabetes), the glucose obtained from food cannot be stored or used for energy. Consequently, its level in the blood remains high. This is known as hyperglycaemia. The raised blood glucose causes a variety of symptoms (fig 1), and if the diabetes remains uncontrolled, there may be damage to some of the body organs such as the eyes, nerves, kidney and feet.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 90 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 19 August 2019

Hayet Cherrad, Sherazede Bouderbala, Yahiaoui Zidan and Djamil Krouf

The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of olive cake (CO) on glycaemia and lipemia and lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes activities in erythrocytes…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of olive cake (CO) on glycaemia and lipemia and lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes activities in erythrocytes and tissues, in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats.

Design/methodology/approach

Diabetes was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of STZ (55 mg/kg BW). In total, 12 diabetic D rats, weighing 260 ± 20 g, were divided into two groups fed a casein diet supplemented (D-OC) or not (D) with OC (7.5 per cent), for four weeks.

Findings

In D-OC compared with D, glycaemia, total cholesterol and triglycerides values (−40 per cent; p = 0.007, 27 per cent; p = 0.007 and −27 per cent; p = 0.0019). In erythrocyte, liver, kidney, heart, muscle and brain, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances contents were respectively, (−19 per cent; p = 0.03, −32 per cent; p = 0.002, −20 per cent; p = 0.04, −68 per cent; p = 0.003, −74 per cent; p = 0.0003 and −38 per cent; p = 0.04). In erythrocyte, SOD, GSH-Px and CAT activities were respectively, (+14 per cent; p = 0.01, +74 per cent; p = 0.012 and +34 per cent; p = 0.0009). In the liver, kidney, heart and muscle, SOD activity was respectively, (+31 per cent; p = 0.004, +12 per cent; p = 0.038, +43 per cent; p = 0.001 and +23 per cent; p = 0.18). GSH-Px activity was respectively, (+121 per cent; p = 0.0009, 89 per cent; p = 0.0006, + 95 per cent; p = 0.008, +71 per cent; p = 0.02 and +26 per cent; p = 0.01), in the liver, kidney, heart, muscle and brain. Catalase activity was (+21 per cent; p = 0.008) in the liver, (+88 per cent; p = 0.0002 in the kidney, +53 per cent; p = 0,002 in the heart and 83 per cent; p = 0.00004 in the muscle).

Originality/value

In diabetic rats, OC reduces hyperglycaemia induced by STZ and attenuates triglyceridemia and cholesterolemia. This residue is able to decrease the oxidative stress by increasing the antioxidant enzymes activity in erythrocytes and tissues. The high contents of phytoconstituents present in OC are considered to be responsible for this effect.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

1 – 10 of 197