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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2021

Hardius Usman, Chairy Chairy and Nucke Widowati Kusumo Projo

The purpose of this paper is to: build Muslim consumer decision-making style (MCDMS); analyze the influence of the consumer decision-making style on Muslim behavior to buy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to: build Muslim consumer decision-making style (MCDMS); analyze the influence of the consumer decision-making style on Muslim behavior to buy halal certified food; analyze the impact of religiosity on Muslim behavior in buying halal-certified food and study the role of religiosity in the relationship between MCDMS and Muslim behavior in buying halal certified food.

Design/methodology/approach

This study’s target population is the Muslim Indonesian population age at least 18 years old. The self-administered survey method is carried out based on convenience and snowball sampling techniques and the questionnaire is distributed online. This study collects data from 396 Muslim respondents in Indonesia through an online survey. Factor analysis and regression with interaction variables are applied to test the research hypothesis statistically.

Findings

This study reveals several results: MCDMS produces 10 dimensions; halal consciousness is an important dimension; the perfectionist/high-quality conscious and price-conscious, has a significant negative effect on the intention to buy halal-certified food; the halal consciousness and the recreational/hedonic conscious have a significant positive effect on the intention to buy halal certified food; religiosity has a significant positive impact directly on the intention to purchase halal-certified food; Religiosity positively moderates the impact of a perfectionist/high-quality conscious and price-conscious on the intention to buy halal-certified food.

Originality/value

This paper will build an MCDMS by adding the dimensions of halal consciousness. The author has not found literature about MCDMS. This research will also study the impact of MCDMS and religiosity on the intention to buy halal-certified food, as well as will study the role of religiosity in relationships between Muslim decision-making styles and intention to buy halal-certified food. Similar research is still very limited in marketing literature.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2020

Siti Hasnah Hassan, Norizan Mat Saad, Tajul Ariffin Masron and Siti Insyirah Ali

Buy Muslim’s First campaign started with the primary aim of urging the Muslim community to be more vigilant about halal or Shariah-compliant products, leading to a number…

Abstract

Purpose

Buy Muslim’s First campaign started with the primary aim of urging the Muslim community to be more vigilant about halal or Shariah-compliant products, leading to a number of halal-related issues, triggered by the exploitation or misuse of the halal logo in Malaysia. The purpose of this study is to gain an understanding of the purchase intention for Muslim-made products by applying the theory of planned behaviour (TPB). Halal consciousness was integrated as a moderating influence on the purchase intention of Muslim-made products.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection was performed through a self-administered questionnaire which was distributed through convenience sampling method. Therefore, a useful sample comprising 152 Malay Muslim participants aged over 18 was collected. For hypothesis testing, hierarchical multiple regression analysis was implemented.

Findings

It was found that the participants’ attitudes towards the purchase of Muslim-made products and their perceived behavioural control significantly influenced their purchase intention, but the subjective norm did not impact this intention. Furthermore, halal consciousness moderated the relationships among all the independent and dependent variables. Halal consciousness moderated the relationship between participants’ attitudes towards Muslim-made products and their perceived behavioural control towards the purchase intention; however, this moderation did not occur through the subjective norm and the purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

As the findings of this study were limited to the Muslim population in Malaysia, it might be difficult to generalize for other nations that have no similarities with the Malaysian Muslim culture.

Practical implications

The findings of this study may support Muslims to implement more effective marketing strategies that attract the target customers to purchase Muslim-made products. Effective promotion may attract potential customers as well.

Originality/value

The halal consciousness among Muslim consumers is important for the moderation and prediction of consumers’ intention to purchase Muslim-made products.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2019

Dwi Agustina Kurniawati and Hana Savitri

This paper aims to measure and analyze the halal awareness of Indonesian consumers toward halal products. This paper also measures the religious belief, health reason…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to measure and analyze the halal awareness of Indonesian consumers toward halal products. This paper also measures the religious belief, health reason, halal logo certification and exposures of Indonesian consumers and tests the correlation between those and halal awareness. The finding can be used as reference for government and halal policymakers related with halal product.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is performed using self-administrated questionnaires and convenience sampling. The questionnaires were distributed for Muslim respondents in Indonesia, male and female, aged 18 up to 60 years old. The data are statistically analyzed by Cronbach’s alpha and Pearson correlation test using SPSS 16.0.

Findings

The study found that halal awareness of Indonesian consumers is very good (very high) with index of 94.91. The halal awareness is supported with very high index of religious belief (96.61), health reason (89.83) and logo certification (84.71), and good index of exposures (78.72). The study also shows that religious belief becomes the most factor that influence the Indonesian halal awareness, followed by health reason then logo certification, while exposure is the least factor influencing the halal awareness.

Originality/value

This research is one of few studies in Indonesian context which is investigating and measuring the index of halal awareness of Indonesian consumers. The study also provided new findings of Indonesian halal awareness influence factors (religious beliefs, health reason, logo certification and exposure); its index and its correlation to the halal awareness level. The result of the study is quite different with other halal awareness studies. Therefore, this paper becomes one of the pioneer for study in the context of Indonesian halal awareness analysis.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Hayat M. Awan, Ahmad Nabeel Siddiquei and Zeeshan Haider

The purpose of this paper is to identify and determine the connection of various antecedents from educational literary works with Halal purchase intention. It also aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and determine the connection of various antecedents from educational literary works with Halal purchase intention. It also aims to investigate which antecedents, among all antecedents, have the highest possible participation toward the development of Halal food purchase intention. Consumers across the globe have an ever increasing demand for Halal items nowadays. Similarly, food stuff in Halal category has an increased acceptance across the globe. Numerous researches have therefore focused on Halal food perception, Halal understanding and its approval in various areas of the world.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 300 respondents were taken from four major cities of Pakistan to examine the relationship of factors that influence customer’s Halal purchase intention. Data were collected through structured questionnaire having seven-point Likert scale. It was divided into eight sections with statements measuring Halal Awareness, Halal Marketing, Subjective norms, Religion and Religiosity, Attitude, Subjective norms, Perceived Behavioural control, Halal Certification and Purchase Intention.

Findings

The paper draws the findings that most of the customers rely on Halal Marketing, Personal and Societal perception and Halal certifications. On the other hand, least importance was given to their religious beliefs when making a purchase decision. The findings also suggest that customers are influenced by Halal Marketing and Branding practices of food products as they are being influenced by the sales promotions and celebrity endorsements. It has also been found that customers are willing to spend considerable efforts and money to purchase Halal food.

Originality/value

The paper clarifies the strategies for Halal food manufacturers and marketers who are following Islamic Marketing philosophy as a base for their marketing campaigns. The study also provides a detailed insight into various behavioural, societal and marketing dimensions that guides the customers about their purchase intentions.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Ujang Maman, Akhmad Mahbubi and Ferry Jie

This study aims to identify halal risk events, halal risk agents, measure halal risk level and formulate the halal risk control model (mitigation) in all stages in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify halal risk events, halal risk agents, measure halal risk level and formulate the halal risk control model (mitigation) in all stages in the beef supply chain from Australia to Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

This research combines qualitative and quantitative method. It elaborates nine variables as the Halal Control Point: halal animal, animal welfare, stunning, knife, slaughter person, slaughter method, invocation, packaging, labeling and halal meat. This study uses house of risk, a model for proactive supply chain risk.

Findings

The main mitigation strategies to guarantee the halal beef status in the abattoir is the obligation of vendor or the factory to issue a written manual of stunning tool. The priority of halal risk mitigation strategies for the retailing to avoid the meat contamination is the need of a halal policy for transporter’s companies and supermarkets.

Research limitations/implications

Every actor must be strongly committed to the application of halal risk mitigation strategies and every chain must be implemented in the halal assurance system.

Originality/value

This model will be a good reference for halal meat auditing and reference for halal meat import procurement policy.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Rajasekhara Mouly Potluri, Rizwana Ansari, Saqib Rasool Khan and Srinivasa Rao Dasaraju

This study aims to investigate the attitude and consciousness of Indian Muslims toward halal and also to indicate the alertness of Muslim students about halal in their daily life.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the attitude and consciousness of Indian Muslims toward halal and also to indicate the alertness of Muslim students about halal in their daily life.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 500 respondents were selected for the study from the State of Andhra Pradesh in India, by stratified random sampling method; of which 300 were general Muslims and 200 were Muslim students. Self-administrated questionnaire and personal interviews were administered to garner the data, which were analyzed with SPSS (version 21.0) and GRETL, and the research hypotheses were tested with Z-test for proportion and Pearson’s chi-square test.

Findings

A total of 92 and 98 per cent of respondents from the general Muslim community and Muslim students, respectively, agreed that they do not have proper exposure to halal. In addition, 89 per cent of general Muslims believe that the halal concept is very significant to Muslim consumers as against 95 per cent students. A total of 98 and 96 per cent of the selected two classes of respondents, respectively, are intended to know more about halal.

Research limitations/implications

The respondents in this research were general Muslims and Muslim students from Andhra Pradesh. The results of this research are, therefore, only applicable to the sampled community. Hence, generalization of the findings to the whole Indian Muslim population or to other areas of Muslim communities should be avoided.

Practical implications

This research results proffer most precious and ingenious information to the corporate sector, Islamic religious organizations and educational institutions specially involved in formal Islamic education. Based on the snowballing trend of Muslim population from the present 250 million to the whopping 340 million by the end of this century, it is an inspired decision to target this lucrative segment which provide alluring profitability particularly food, cosmetics, medicines, etc., with Halal certified products. Specially, Islamic religious organizations also have an enormous onus to enhance the ken of this community on the matters comprehensively germane to Islam in general and about halal and haram in particular.

Originality/value

This is the first ingenious effort aimed to investigate the attitude and awareness toward halal among general Muslims and Muslim students. This is a pioneering attempt on halal of Indian Muslims which is lucrative for both corporate sector and to the academia.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2020

Emiliya Ahmadova and Khatai Aliyev

The purpose of this study is to analyze the customer attitude on Halal food products and determine major factors that affect the attitudes towards Halal food products in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to analyze the customer attitude on Halal food products and determine major factors that affect the attitudes towards Halal food products in Azerbaijan. Within the framework of this research, theory of planned behavior was applied and influence of subjective norms, religiosity level, availability of Halal certification and health considerations on attitude toward Halal food products was measured.

Design/methodology/approach

Random sampling technique was used during these studies. Within the framework of current research, the local Muslim population was surveyed. The sample size for current research was 636, and specified models were estimated using Eview by applying a robust least squares method.

Findings

The impact of subjective norms, religiosity level and availability of Halal certification and health considerations upon consumer’s attitude is economically and statistically significant. Empirical findings show that the strength of the association between religiosity level and attitude toward Halal food products is dependent on the level of religiosity and some other factors such as age category, gender status and existence of halal certification.

Practical implications

As a predominantly Muslim country, exploring attitudes toward Halal food products in Azerbaijan can serve as a valuable source of information while developing Halal branding strategy in this market, i.e. insights gaining from this research will guide marketers while tailoring their marketing strategy for efficiently targeting this market.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical research in Azerbaijani market devoted to understanding factors that influence Halal food purchase attitude.

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2021

Arun Kumar Tarofder, Umme Salma Sultana, Raisal Ismail, Suha Fouad Salem and Adiza Alhassan Musah

The purpose of this study is two-fold: classifying non-Muslim halal fashion buyers by applying quantitative techniques and identifying the persuading determinants of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is two-fold: classifying non-Muslim halal fashion buyers by applying quantitative techniques and identifying the persuading determinants of the non-Muslim women’ halal fashion buying behaviour (HFBB).

Design/methodology/approach

By adapting items from prior studies, a structured questionnaire was developed and distributed face-to-face to various Muslim fashion stores in Malaysia. After a one-month effort, 221 responses were obtained from non-Muslim consumers by using convenience sampling. Next, a clustering analysis was used to classify them from a contrasting perspective. Finally, regression and Andrew F. Hayes’s process procedures were applied to examine the three independent variables’ effect and the moderating variables.

Findings

The results revealed the characteristic behaviour of the non-Muslim women explicitly, which is related to their halal fashion purchasing decision. Based on the ANOVA results, there were different motives for buying halal fashion by non-Muslim women. Additionally, it was found that the most crucial determinants for non-Muslim’s HFBB are “cultural adaptation”, albeit, there is no substantial proof of a significant moderating effect of age and income on the consumers.

Research limitations/implications

These discoveries are advantageous for halal fashion retailers and provide an appealing domain for further investigations in the context of the global halal study.

Practical implications

This study provided an idea for an untapped segment on the halal fashion sellers’ segmentation and positioning strategy. The study’s results suggested specific managerial and practical recommendation that the sellers can use to attract non-Muslim consumers.

Originality/value

This study was amongst the uncommon investigations within the halal fashion context that will enlighten the managers’ selling strategy on the most neglected market segment. The results of this study provided an empirical understanding of how to sell halal fashion to non-Muslim consumers.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2019

Seyed Mehrshad Parvin Hosseini, Maryam Mirzaei and Mohammad Iranmanesh

This study aims to investigate the factors that motivate Muslim consumers to pay for halal-certified food.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the factors that motivate Muslim consumers to pay for halal-certified food.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a survey of 272 Muslim consumers in Malaysia. The data were analyzed using the partial least squares technique.

Findings

The results showed that animal slaughter, halal logo, food quality and religious commitment have a positive effect on the willingness to pay for halal food. Religious commitment positively moderates the relationship between storage and transportation and the willingness to pay for halal-certified food.

Practical implications

Policy makers as well as managers of halal food companies can benefit from this study which provides insight into ways to increase demand for halal food.

Originality/value

The findings contribute to the literature on halal foods by illustrating the factors that determine Muslim consumers’ willingness to pay for halal food. This study also extends the literature by testing the moderating role of religious commitment.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Mahmood Chandia and Jan Mei Soon

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of different understandings regarding the concept of “what constitutes halal” and “who determines this concept?” In…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of different understandings regarding the concept of “what constitutes halal” and “who determines this concept?” In practice, this equates to contemporary legal understandings vs religious understandings. The paper further aims to provide an overview of competing Muslim understandings regarding the concept of “What does or does not constitute halal slaughter?” In practice, this equates to evaluating the application of no stunning at all upon an animal (unanimous acceptance) vs the application of reversible stunning upon an animal (contested).

Design/methodology/approach

The study includes a review of prior literature and considers the current scenario of the halal poultry trade and raises important questions regarding Islamic dietary practices, halal food integrity, religious and animal welfare understandings. Three key questions were raised: “To what extent does stunning impact halal slaughter?”; “Who determines what is halal slaughter?”; and “What are the variations and tensions between legal and religious understandings of halal slaughter?”.

Findings

The examination of such requirements and concomitant consumer and provider expectations is underpinned by a study of an operational framework, i.e. industry practices with poultry (hand slaughter, stunning, mechanical slaughter, etc.), ethical values and market forces to appraise whether there is a point of convergence for these that can be beneficial for both seller and consumer concerns. This paper has considered different perspectives on the religious slaughter and provided an overview of competing understandings regarding the above concepts.

Originality/value

This study although academic and philosophical in nature, raises questions on route to suggesting future research directions. It provides real value in stimulating more research in the area of halal food production and contributes to the understanding of different slaughter requirements for religious slaughter and the meat industry. It further sheds light on not only the religious and secular legal frameworks on animal slaughter and welfare but also the variations in understanding between them and provides examples of attempts to bridge any gap. The paper highlights the importance of halal food based on religious values and its implications for wider society.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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