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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

M.M. Metwally

Introduction Although there is no Muslim country, at present, which can be called an Islamic economy, in the sense of following, in a strict fashion, the teachings of the

Abstract

Introduction Although there is no Muslim country, at present, which can be called an Islamic economy, in the sense of following, in a strict fashion, the teachings of the Qur'an, the traditions of Prophet Muhammad and the practices of early Muslims, a majority of Muslim consumers would seem to hold to Islamic values and views regarding the disposal of their incomes. The aim of this paper is to throw some light on the effect of this behaviour on optimal consumption of a Muslim individual. The paper is divided into three sections. Section one briefly summarises the economic behaviour of a non‐religious (rational) consumer. Section two discusses the utility function of a Muslim consumer and highlights the differences between this function and that of a non‐Muslim consumer. Section three determines the conditions of optimum consumption of a Muslim consumer.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Ili‐Salsabila Abd‐Razak and Asmat‐Nizam Abdul‐Talib

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the globality and intentionality aspects of consumer boycotts among the Muslim dominant markets around the world through the

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the globality and intentionality aspects of consumer boycotts among the Muslim dominant markets around the world through the consumer animosity perspective, to provide better understanding of the issues. Some applied and potential solutions for marketers and policy makers in dealing with the issues are also discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

The analytical definition of consumer boycotts through the consumer animosity perspective is proposed and the relevance of the discussion is considered. The relationships between the globality and intentionality attributions with animosity and consumer boycotts are assessed before strategies to deal with the issues are diagnosed. Seminal works of classic and current consumer boycotts and animosity literature are reviewed in developing the conceptual background of the paper. Further conceptual reflections are stated based on the depicted current events in the market around the world.

Findings

The conceptual discussion revealed that consumer boycotts in the Muslim dominant market and animosity are two related issues worthy being explored. The issues are of the global concern and occurred unintentionally, therefore they could stimulate unexpected outcomes for the marketers and policy makers alike. Nonetheless, several strategies in dealing with the issues are found to be effective in preventing the issues from getting worse. However, the strategies would not work for all entities in all situations. Understanding the root of the issues would be the best solution.

Research limitations/implications

The discussion is limited to conceptual background of the aspects discussed. Further empirical studies would enhance the applicability of the discussions presented.

Practical implications

In order to find strategies to deal with consumer boycotts in the Muslim dominant markets, marketers need to understand the real reason for the events to occur and demonstrate sincere understanding towards the issues. By doing so, consumer boycotts would not obstruct the progress and growth of the international business in general. Looking at the issues from the animosity perspective is a prolific attempt to understand the events.

Originality/value

The paper reveals the relationship between consumer boycotts and animosity in the Muslim dominant markets and offers understanding of the specific events occurrence. The discussion is extended to describe the events' globality and intentionality attribution assessment.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2021

Shaizatulaqma Kamalul Ariffin, Nur Qistina Ihsannuddin and Ainul Mohsin Abdul Mohsin

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between attitude functions and attitude towards social media advertising. Additionally, this study also examines…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between attitude functions and attitude towards social media advertising. Additionally, this study also examines the relationship between attitude towards social media advertising and purchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

The data was collected via an online survey among Malaysian Muslim participants. Quantitative analysis was used to test the hypothesis. A total of 280 respondents participated in the online survey but only 264 responses fit the analysis. The data was analysed via SPSS and partial least squares structural equation modelling.

Findings

The findings of this paper show that attitude functions, namely, utilitarian, value-expressive, ego-defensive and religiosity have a significant positive influence on attitude towards social media advertising, whilst knowledge function was found to be insignificant. Attitude towards social media advertising was also found to have a significant positive influence on purchase intention.

Practical implications

Advertisers should also consider the religious aspects of Muslim consumers and their level of sensitivity as Muslims nowadays are well-informed. This is to avoid controversies and have a better understanding of their consumer needs.

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies examining the influence of religiosity in the social media advertising of controversial products such as bubble tea.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2021

Suzanna ElMassah and Heba Abou-El-Sood

As the popularity of Islamic banking and financial instruments continues to rise globally, a recurring empirical question is what specifically makes consumers choose…

Abstract

Purpose

As the popularity of Islamic banking and financial instruments continues to rise globally, a recurring empirical question is what specifically makes consumers choose Islamic banking. This paper aims to investigate the determinants of bank type selection, especially in culturally diverse settings where the Islamic banking sector is well-established. It further examines whether consumers’ gender/religion influences their choices. One intuitive prediction is that Muslim consumers opt for Islamic banking products as “ethical” because of conviction-related reasons. However, the reality is not necessarily straightforward.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses structural equation modeling to examine data collected from a survey questionnaire of 790 respondents in an emerging market setting. Further analysis is made based on gender and religion to remove related bias.

Findings

Results suggest that overall consumer awareness significantly affects the selection of Islamic banking products. The positive effect of awareness is more significant for Muslim consumers relative to non-Muslims. Interestingly, social stimuli and bank attributes have an insignificant effect on the banking choices of both Muslims and non-Muslims.

Practical implications

Results suggest that Islamic banks’ marketing managers should adopt differentiated strategies for men and women, focusing on the core benefits of the service or personal interactions with consumers, respectively, along with a focus on different aspects of personal service for each gender. Awareness should be enhanced by adopting informative and effective marketing strategies to attract and retain consumers in the competitive bank environment. Islamic banks (IB) should pay attention to the religious effect without considering it as the sole variable motivating potential customers. They should design segmented and customized marketing strategies based on gender-religion market segmentation to suit different groups’ needs.

Originality/value

The findings fill a gap in the literature and provide Islamic bankers with insights to help design and articulate their business strategies to appeal to consumers in a multicultural context. Examining an integral part of gender and religion mitigates biased estimates due to the omission of variables. The study contributes to the existing literature on customer preferences for IB with a relatively large, new data set.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2021

Reezlin Abdul Rahman, Mohd Salehuddin Mohd Zahari, Mohd Hafiz Hanafiah and Mohd Nor Mamat

The available research works dealing with Halal food are centrally concerned with the Halal certification, logistics, export market, consumer awareness and business ethics…

Abstract

Purpose

The available research works dealing with Halal food are centrally concerned with the Halal certification, logistics, export market, consumer awareness and business ethics with minimal study explores Muslim consumers’ purchase behaviour of Syubhah semi-processed food. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between Muslim consumers’ knowledge on the wholesomeness, labelling, trust and purchase behaviour of Syubhah semi-processed food.

Design/methodology/approach

The study respondents are Muslim consumers in the semi and rural areas. Through a self-administered survey, 780 usable responses were successfully collected. The study hypotheses were analysed using the partial least squares structural equation modelling. Mediation analyses were conducted, focusing on the effect of trust on the relationship between consumer knowledge on the wholesomeness, labelling and purchase behaviour of Syubhah semi-processed food.

Findings

This study confirms that lack of knowledge on the wholesomeness and labelling among the semi and rural Muslim consumers influences them to purchase the Syubhah semi-processed food. Trust significantly plays a significant mediation role on the consumer Syubhah semi-processed food purchase behaviour.

Originality/value

This study confirms there is lack of knowledge among the semi and rural Muslim consumers on Syubhah semi-processed food. Such pessimistic indications of Syubhah food products carry varying consequences and implications for Muslim consumers, Halal food producers and the relevant religious authorities.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2021

Hardius Usman, Chairy Chairy and Nucke Widowati Kusumo Projo

The purpose of this paper is to: build Muslim consumer decision-making style (MCDMS); analyze the influence of the consumer decision-making style on Muslim behavior to buy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to: build Muslim consumer decision-making style (MCDMS); analyze the influence of the consumer decision-making style on Muslim behavior to buy halal certified food; analyze the impact of religiosity on Muslim behavior in buying halal-certified food and study the role of religiosity in the relationship between MCDMS and Muslim behavior in buying halal certified food.

Design/methodology/approach

This study’s target population is the Muslim Indonesian population age at least 18 years old. The self-administered survey method is carried out based on convenience and snowball sampling techniques and the questionnaire is distributed online. This study collects data from 396 Muslim respondents in Indonesia through an online survey. Factor analysis and regression with interaction variables are applied to test the research hypothesis statistically.

Findings

This study reveals several results: MCDMS produces 10 dimensions; halal consciousness is an important dimension; the perfectionist/high-quality conscious and price-conscious, has a significant negative effect on the intention to buy halal-certified food; the halal consciousness and the recreational/hedonic conscious have a significant positive effect on the intention to buy halal certified food; religiosity has a significant positive impact directly on the intention to purchase halal-certified food; Religiosity positively moderates the impact of a perfectionist/high-quality conscious and price-conscious on the intention to buy halal-certified food.

Originality/value

This paper will build an MCDMS by adding the dimensions of halal consciousness. The author has not found literature about MCDMS. This research will also study the impact of MCDMS and religiosity on the intention to buy halal-certified food, as well as will study the role of religiosity in relationships between Muslim decision-making styles and intention to buy halal-certified food. Similar research is still very limited in marketing literature.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2021

Arun Kumar Tarofder, Umme Salma Sultana, Raisal Ismail, Suha Fouad Salem and Adiza Alhassan Musah

The purpose of this study is two-fold: classifying non-Muslim halal fashion buyers by applying quantitative techniques and identifying the persuading determinants of the

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is two-fold: classifying non-Muslim halal fashion buyers by applying quantitative techniques and identifying the persuading determinants of the non-Muslim women’ halal fashion buying behaviour (HFBB).

Design/methodology/approach

By adapting items from prior studies, a structured questionnaire was developed and distributed face-to-face to various Muslim fashion stores in Malaysia. After a one-month effort, 221 responses were obtained from non-Muslim consumers by using convenience sampling. Next, a clustering analysis was used to classify them from a contrasting perspective. Finally, regression and Andrew F. Hayes’s process procedures were applied to examine the three independent variables’ effect and the moderating variables.

Findings

The results revealed the characteristic behaviour of the non-Muslim women explicitly, which is related to their halal fashion purchasing decision. Based on the ANOVA results, there were different motives for buying halal fashion by non-Muslim women. Additionally, it was found that the most crucial determinants for non-Muslim’s HFBB are “cultural adaptation”, albeit, there is no substantial proof of a significant moderating effect of age and income on the consumers.

Research limitations/implications

These discoveries are advantageous for halal fashion retailers and provide an appealing domain for further investigations in the context of the global halal study.

Practical implications

This study provided an idea for an untapped segment on the halal fashion sellers’ segmentation and positioning strategy. The study’s results suggested specific managerial and practical recommendation that the sellers can use to attract non-Muslim consumers.

Originality/value

This study was amongst the uncommon investigations within the halal fashion context that will enlighten the managers’ selling strategy on the most neglected market segment. The results of this study provided an empirical understanding of how to sell halal fashion to non-Muslim consumers.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Norafni @ Farlina binti Rahim

Islamic finance and Halal product sectors are thriving successfully. This chapter is a general review of the perception of Asian consumers on Islamic finance and Halal…

Abstract

Purpose

Islamic finance and Halal product sectors are thriving successfully. This chapter is a general review of the perception of Asian consumers on Islamic finance and Halal sectors in the global Halal economy.

Methodology/approach

The first section will briefly describe the Halal concept in both Islamic finance and Halal industries, and the growth of both sectors in Asian countries. The second part highlights the review of Asian consumers’ perception towards Islamic finance products and Halal products.

Findings

The review found that the consumers’ perception towards the Islamic finance products and Halal products is distinctive. This is due to the diversity of Asian countries in terms of geography, religion, culture, ethnic, school of thoughts (madzahib), income per capita and government’s involvement.

Originality/value

The third part of the chapter concentrates on planning towards Halal marketing, which involves the move and future challenges in different layers of industries to gear up and strengthen the Halal economy.

Details

Advances in Islamic Finance, Marketing, and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-899-8

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Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Mehree Iqbal and Nabila Nisha

This study aims to explore the presumed relationship between religion and purchase behavior of consumers in the context of Bangladesh.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the presumed relationship between religion and purchase behavior of consumers in the context of Bangladesh.

Methodology/approach

This research is divided into two main parts. In the first one, the authors reviewed some of the most important studies relative to religion and marketing and those specifically relative to Islamic marketing. In the second part, this research shows the findings of a structured questionnaire administered to a sample of Muslim consumers currently residing in the capital city of Bangladesh – Dhaka. The questionnaire also sought to find out the respondents’ attitude towards the modern marketing tactics, in terms of the physical and visual appearance of local products, their perception of religious principles in the purchase decision and their attitude towards imported products of non-Muslim countries.

Findings

Results of this study highlight that religion often represents an essential reference point in influencing the perception and purchase behavior of consumers in the context of Bangladesh. This implies that marketing strategies based on Islamic ethics is going to be quite instrumental in order to reach out to the consumers in Muslim countries. As such, there is largely a strong positive relationship between religion and the purchase behavior of Muslim consumers.

Research limitations/implications

The lack of research on Islamic marketing limits the intensity of arguments in this study. For this reason, the literature review is not completely exhaustive. A small sample size has also been used due to time and resource constraints. Future research can be done on a bigger sample size of Bangladesh or other Islamic countries across the world. Other research avenues may include the study of Islamic marketing mix and exploring the factors that can influence non-Muslim consumers to select products and services based on Islamic ethics.

Practical implications

It is very important for businesses to introduce healthy practices in countries like Bangladesh and this can be rightly achieved through the use of Islamic marketing. Furthermore, the use of Islamic ethics in marketing strategies can eventually influence the religious perception of consumers and make them loyal towards any brands, products, and services in the context of Bangladesh.

Originality/value

The chapter draws attention to Bangladesh as one of the potential markets where the concept of Islamic market mechanism can be established. It also highlights the challenges that global marketers can face with Islamic marketing in Muslim countries like Bangladesh. Besides, it is the only study to date that focuses upon the relationship of religion, marketing, and consumer behavior for consumer products of the manufacturing industry.

Details

Advances in Islamic Finance, Marketing, and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-899-8

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2020

Dg Ku Zunaidah Ag Majid, Suhaila Abdul Hanan and Hazlinda Hassan

The halal industry has been growing in recent years, seeing an increasing demand for halal products from both Muslim and non-Muslim consumers and acknowledging that halal…

Abstract

Purpose

The halal industry has been growing in recent years, seeing an increasing demand for halal products from both Muslim and non-Muslim consumers and acknowledging that halal is a universal concept accepted by both Muslim and non-Muslim societies. Service-related providers, such as logistics, could influence the demand for halal products by consumers. This paper aims to investigate the factors that influence consumers' willingness to pay (WTP) for halal logistics among young non-Muslim adults.

Design/methodology/approach

A set of survey questions were distributed to young non-Muslim adults and 280 questionnaires were analysed.

Findings

The results indicate that three independent variables had a direct relationship and significant influence on the WTP for halal logistics among non-Muslim consumers. These variables are concern on halal, knowledge about halal and perception of halal logistics. Meanwhile, the awareness of halal logistics significantly influenced the consumers' WTP for halal logistics, provided that it was mediated by the perception of halal logistics.

Originality/value

Given the gap in research on halal logistics and WTP, this paper presents a consolidated examination of this subject, particularly the WTP of young non-Muslim adults. Furthermore, by including the perception of halal logistics as a mediator, this study leverages the halal logistics knowledge to a new level, thus deepening the understanding of this topic and contributing additional knowledge. This study also presents some opportunities for future empirical research.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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