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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2020

Nasreen Khan, Abdullah Sarwar and Booi Chen Tan

Halal cosmetic products are considered as innovation and revolution in the cosmetic industry as they offer high-quality products that follow the halal compliance and meet…

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1777

Abstract

Purpose

Halal cosmetic products are considered as innovation and revolution in the cosmetic industry as they offer high-quality products that follow the halal compliance and meet the strict scientific guidelines. However, halal cosmetic brands are still facing challenges in their positioning and are unable to identify how to encourage customers to buy. Although there is an increasing awareness towards the use of halal cosmetics among the Generation Y consumers, the factors that might stimulus their purchase intention of halal cosmetics is still ambiguous. Besides, there is a lack of well-established study on the role of religious belief as a predictor to Generation Y consumers’ purchase intention. To address the gap, this study aims to propose a model to reveal the distinctive factors that influence the purchase intention of halal cosmetics among Generation Y in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

The population for this study consisted of Generation Y consumers. A closed-ended questionnaire was used for data collection from a sample of 262 respondents. The proposed model was tested using partial least squares structural equation modelling.

Findings

This study discovered that ingredient safety followed by the halal logo is very important predictor for the purchase intention of halal cosmetic products among Generation Y consumers. Unexpectedly, this study finds that religious belief plays the least important role in purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

This study fills the gap in the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) by improving its limitation through considering the unbiased determinant of behaviour i.e. religious belief.

Practical implications

This study recommends cosmetics companies to position their products based on the importance of safety ingredient with halal logo as unique attributes of the product. It also suggests marketers to understand the right promotion strategy to be used in targeting the right market segment.

Originality/value

TPB is only based on cognitive processing and it ignores one’s needs/motivations prior to engaging in certain behaviour. Hence, this study looks into religious belief as a means of motivation and one of the important determinants of TPB.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Dwi Suhartanto, David Dean, Ira Siti Sarah, Raditha Hapsari, Fatya Alty Amalia and Tintin Suhaeni

This paper aims to assess customer loyalty towards halal cosmetics using three integrated loyalty routes of product quality, emotional attachment and religious determinants.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess customer loyalty towards halal cosmetics using three integrated loyalty routes of product quality, emotional attachment and religious determinants.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for this study were gathered from 457 s cosmetics customers. Variance-based structural equation modelling was applied to assess the association between product quality, emotional attachment, religiosity, customer satisfaction and customer loyalty.

Findings

This study reveals that for halal cosmetics, customer loyalty is driven more by emotional attachment and product quality than by religiosity. Further, the religiosity does not moderate the relationship between customer satisfaction and customer loyalty. Finally, this study reveals that the impact of emotional attachment and product quality on customer loyalty is partly through strengthening customer satisfaction.

Practical implications

This study provides an opportunity for halal cosmetics managers to increase customer loyalty through the development of emotional attachment and product quality. To develop customer loyalty towards their halal cosmetic products, this study suggests that halal cosmetics managers should offer high-quality products and continuously innovate their cosmetic products.

Originality/value

This is an early empirical study attempting to examine the link between religiosity and customer loyalty in halal cosmetic products.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Tanti Handriana, Praptini Yulianti, Masmira Kurniawati, Nidya Ayu Arina, Ratri Amelia Aisyah, Made Gitanadya Ayu Aryani and Raras Kirana Wandira

The purpose of this study is to analyze millennial generation purchase behavior on halal cosmetic products in Indonesia.

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1302

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to analyze millennial generation purchase behavior on halal cosmetic products in Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

The research approach used is a quantitative approach with the research method in the form of a survey and the sampling technique using purposive sampling. The respondents in this study are 206 Muslim females of the millennial generation. Structural equation modeling (SEM) with AMOS software is used for analyzing the data of this study.

Findings

This study found that of the 11 hypotheses tested, 10 of them were accepted: H1, H2, H3, H4, H6, H7, H8, H9, H10 and H11. The accepted hypotheses are the influence of perceived value on trust, brand image on trust, brand image on attitude, religious belief on attitude, halal certification on halal awareness, trust on attitude and halal awareness on attitude. As for trust, attitude toward product, halal awareness affects the intention to purchase halal cosmetics. Moreover, H5 was not accepted, namely, the influence of religious belief on halal awareness. The findings of this study are expected to contribute to the development of marketing theory, specifically related to consumer behavior of halal cosmetic products, as well as the development of the concept of consumer behavior based on demographics, namely, the millennial generation.

Originality/value

This study is more comprehensive than previous studies, and this study is focused on the millennial generation.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2019

Suraiya Ishak, Ahmad Raflis Che Omar, Kartini Khalid, Intan Safiena Ab. Ghafar and Mohd Yusof Hussain

The purpose of this study is to describe cosmetics purchase behavior of young, educated Muslim females in Malaysia and to explore its relationship with certain potential…

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2094

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to describe cosmetics purchase behavior of young, educated Muslim females in Malaysia and to explore its relationship with certain potential antecedents.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a survey on a sample of female consumers from four higher education institutions in the urban area of Bangi Selangor, Malaysia. From their respective institutions, 150 respondents were selected through the purposive sampling method. Self-administered questionnaire has been used to gather information from the respondents. The survey data were analyzed using descriptive, t-test and correlation analyses to accomplish the study objectives.

Findings

The study indicates that millennial Muslim cosmetic purchase behavior falls under the “Limited Decision Making” classification. The classification is due to the pattern of pro-active behaviors exhibit through the information search for details about ingredients, halal clue, countries of origin, health safety guarantee and the benefits of the cosmetic products. Young, educated female consumers adore branded cosmetic items and show willingness to accept higher prices for the branded items. Despite brand consciousness, they demonstrate a relatively high concern on the halalness of the product. Based on the correlation analysis, all variables were found to be significant and the most significant of them was brand.

Research limitations/implications

Millennial consumers are information technology savvy and have access to vast information about products. As a result, the findings reiterate that millennial consumers demonstrate different purchase behavior, which is worth exploring by future researchers. In addition, other latent antecedents such as religiosity and world view are worth including in future studies.

Practical implications

Cosmetic manufacturers and marketers must ensure that their products signal positive images to fit the expectations of young and educated Muslim consumers. Although brand conscious, such consumers demonstrate prudent behavior in terms of searching for halalan and toyyiban products.

Originality/value

This study adds value in the area of halal product marketing because of two unique focuses. First, it examines the purchase of cosmetic products, which are relatively understudied compared to halal food. Second, it considers the perspectives of educated Muslim millennials, who are expected to demonstrate more specific purchase behaviors than a generalized millennial group. Therefore, the originality of this study revolves around the consideration of these two aspects, which are relevant to contemporary business marketing discussions.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Azmawani Abd Rahman, Ebrahim Asrarhaghighi and Suhaimi Ab Rahman

The purpose of this paper is to add to the body of knowledge about attitude and intention to choose a Halal product. Despite the importance of the Halal cosmetic market…

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9339

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to add to the body of knowledge about attitude and intention to choose a Halal product. Despite the importance of the Halal cosmetic market for both producers and consumers, the existing literature focusses on Halal food products, and only a limited number of studies exist about Halal cosmetic products. This study assesses the effects of knowledge and religiosity on attitudes towards Halal cosmetics products, as well as the effect of those attitudes on the intention to buy the Halal cosmetic products. This study also investigates the existence of differences between consumers’ attitudes towards Halal cosmetics and Halal food products.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a self-administrated questionnaire with closed-ended questions. The questionnaire was distributed using non-probability convenience sampling. At the end of data collection period, a total of 110 usable questionnaires from Muslim respondents over the age of 18 years old were used for further analysis. To assess the relationship between knowledge, religiosity, attitude and intention, a structural equation modeling technique was used. And to investigate the difference between attitude and intention for Halal cosmetic and Halal food products, the pair sample t-test were applied.

Findings

The findings of the study show that the relationship between knowledge and attitude is insignificant, but there is a significant positive relationship between religiosity and attitude. From the lens of theory of reasoned action (TRA), this study indicates that there is a positive relationship between attitude and intention to choose Halal cosmetic products. This study also found a significant difference between consumers’ attitudes towards Halal cosmetics and attitudes towards Halal food products, as well as consumers’ intentions to choose Halal cosmetics and intentions to choose Halal food products among Malaysian consumers. Moreover, the results indicate that Malaysian consumers have more positive attitudes and intentions towards Halal food products than towards Halal cosmetic products.

Research limitations/implications

Because the sample of the study is limited to consumers from one country (Malaysia), it is suggested that the future studies choose their samples from consumers in different countries.

Practical implications

The results of the study give implication to firms competing in the cosmetic industry. Religiosity is one of the main factors that should be taken into account in promoting their cosmetic products. Also, as the relationship between attitude and intention to choose Halal cosmetics is similar to the relationship for Halal foods, marketers may try similar ways to promote both the products. However, the attitude and intention to choose Halal cosmetics is still lower than Halal foods.

Social implications

The result of this study provides an insight for the Malaysian consumers to realize whether knowledge and religiosity have any relationship towards consumers’ attitudes towards Halal cosmetic products. The results also provide information to consumers that they are more likely to have stronger attitudes towards Halal food products than the cosmetic products. This study will be significant to the consumers, the importer and exporter, the producer and marketer and the researcher as well as the government.

Originality/value

This study is the first study which has assessed the antecedents and consequence of consumers’ attitude towards Halal cosmetic products in one model. Moreover, this research is among the first attempts to investigate the significant difference in Malaysian consumers’ attitude and intention between Halal cosmetic and food products.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 24 March 2021

Mohammad Mominul Islam

This study aims to reveal how consumers and shoppers are negative toward alcohol, animal fat, producers and certification issues concerned with halal cosmetics products.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to reveal how consumers and shoppers are negative toward alcohol, animal fat, producers and certification issues concerned with halal cosmetics products.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 527 students of 4 public universities and a medical college across Bangladesh took part in a survey and 150 shoppers from 2 cities participated in the face to face interview with the structured questionnaires. Frequency distribution was used for categorical and numerical data, and the chi-square test with a binary logistic regression model has tested the association between gender and attitudes toward halal cosmetics. Besides, narratives of Sharīʿah regarding alcohol, meat, fat and halal certification have helped understand the halal issue.

Findings

In total, 83% of the respondents perceived negative attitudes against haram animal fat followed by alcohol (74%) and animal fat (64%). The chi-square test shows that consumers held a significant association toward haram animal fat, (p-value 0.000) alcohol, (p-value 0.000) non-Muslim producers (p-value 0.000) and non-Muslim countries (p-value 0.026). Imperatively, the binary logistic regression model has found a significant negative association to haram animal fat (ß2 −0.295) and alcohol (ß1 −0.200).

Practical implications

Marketers ought to avoid haram animal fat in halal cosmetics besides focusing on alcohol freeness. Also, non-Muslim marketers need to be extra cautious in showcasing their identities. However, Islamic marketers will enjoy a competitive advantage in the halal market because of their demographic factors.

Social implications

Islamic principles on alcohol, meat, fat and certification potentially can help other stakeholders sense the halal norms.

Originality/value

This study has blended the elements of Sharīʿah with empirical evidence to shed light on the fundamental and trust factors for the marketing of halal cosmetics products.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2020

Chandra Suparno

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships among individual religiosity, shopping value, attitude and online purchase intention in the context of halal

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1045

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships among individual religiosity, shopping value, attitude and online purchase intention in the context of halal cosmetics products.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a purposive sampling method to collect data. A total of 201 Indonesian Muslim female respondents participated in this survey. Structural equation modeling is used to assess the fit of the framework.

Findings

This study confirms the fitness of Stimuli-Organism-Reaction (SOR) framework in predicting the online purchasing behavior in the context of halal cosmetics products. Individual religiosity and hedonic shopping value are found to have a positive and significant effect on all types of attitudes, and attitudes were confirmed to have a positive and significant effect on online purchasing intention of halal cosmetics products.

Practical implications

This study indicates that in a Muslim majority country such as Indonesia, an understanding of individual religiosity, shopping value and attitude provide relevant insight and scope for marketers to provide techniques to reduce dissonance of non-availability of halal cosmetics brand, especially in the online shopping environment.

Originality/value

This study extends the applicability of SOR framework in which it integrates the role of religiosity, shopping value and attitude in predicting online shopping behavior of halal cosmetics products.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2018

Shadma Shahid, Faheem Ahmed and Uzma Hasan

India accounts for the third-largest Muslim population in the world after Indonesia and Pakistan. The previous studies about halal consumption have focused on the “food…

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1711

Abstract

Purpose

India accounts for the third-largest Muslim population in the world after Indonesia and Pakistan. The previous studies about halal consumption have focused on the “food and money industry” only. Muslim consumers are prohibited from using alcohol, pork and other items in any form; the rising awareness among Muslims has led to the rapid growth in demand of halal cosmetic products around the globe. This paper aims to present a framework of halal consumers’ purchase and explores the factors that Indian consumers consider while buying halal cosmetics.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors carried out qualitative research (focus group discussion and in-depth interviews) in Delhi, Mumbai and Hyderabad to gain deeper insight from the respondents.

Findings

The study found that religiosity and increasing awareness about halal products acts as an influencer for individuals’ halal products consumption along with halal certification and growing education level of Muslim consumers.

Originality/value

The paper has been developed based on the original research work carried out among the halal Muslim consumers in the major Muslim population in metropolitan cities of Hyderabad, Mumbai and Delhi over the past year.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Carrie Amani Annabi and Olufunbi Olajumoke Ibidapo-Obe

The aim of this paper is to investigate the role that halal certification organisations (HCOs) play in the UK in assuring quality in halal cosmetics.

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2312

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate the role that halal certification organisations (HCOs) play in the UK in assuring quality in halal cosmetics.

Design/methodology/approach

The study evaluates whether halal certification assures the quality of halal cosmetic products. This research evaluated the quality assurance systems of major UK HCOs, using a hypothetical product as a test vehicle. The investigation considered whether these organisations differ in their definition of “halal” and “halal cosmetics” and also considered how effectively their certification signals quality assurance.

Findings

The study indicated that there is a failure to adopt holistic halal terminology which implies that within the UK halal cosmetics industry, manufacturers may not be working within agreed standards for halal product integrity.

Research limitations/implications

This study focussed on UK certification for halal cosmetics by three HCOs and disregarded other forms of halal businesses. The literature review is based solely on literature available in the English language. The study lacks generalisability, as only one hypothetical product was tested; therefore, it was not possible to reach an understanding of all the costs involved in UK HCO certification.

Practical implications

This study undertook a comprehensive literature review on halal certification to produce a comparison of halal sanctioning laws, certification processes and the level of supply chain verification by UK HCOs.

Originality/value

This study adds value to the knowledge on UK halal certification.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2019

Abdul Hafaz Ngah, T. Ramayah, Mohd Helmi Ali and Mohd Imran Khan

This study aims to identify the factors influencing the decision to the Halal transportation adoption among pharmaceuticals and cosmetics manufacturers.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the factors influencing the decision to the Halal transportation adoption among pharmaceuticals and cosmetics manufacturers.

Design/methodology/approach

Base on the technology-organization-environment (TOE) framework, applying the purposive sampling method, data were gathered from questionnaires distributed to the participants of Malaysia International Halal Showcase (MIHAS) and Halal festival (Halfest). Out of 110 questionnaires distributed, only 97 data from 102 respondents could be used for further analysis. SMART-PLS 3.2.7 was used to analyze the data for this study using a structural equation modeling approach.

Findings

Perceived benefits, competitive pressure (COMP) and customer pressure were found to have a significant relationship with the intention to adopt Halal warehousing services, the organizational readiness was found to be a not significant factor in the adoption of Halal transportation. Top management attitudes (TMAs) moderate the positive relationship between COMP and the intention to adopt Halal transportation services.

Research limitations/implications

This paper focuses on the Halal manufacturers in the pharmaceuticals and cosmetics industry who attended MIHAS and Halfest, which still not adopting Halal transportation activities.

Practical implications

The findings provide useful information to a better understanding of the factors influencing the adoption of Halal transportation among Malaysian Halal cosmetics and pharmaceutical manufacturers. Related parties such as the government, the Halal transport service providers and the customers could use these findings to plan further action to enhance the adoption of Halal transport adoption.

Originality/value

The study revealed the capability of the TOE framework to identify the factors influencing the decision to adopt Halal transportation among Malaysian Halal cosmetics and pharmaceutical manufacturers. TMA was found to have a moderation effect on the relationship between COMP and the intention to adopt Halal transportation.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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