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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Golnaz Rezai, Zainalabidin Mohamed and Mad Nasir Shamsudin

The aim of this paper is to determine the factors that most likely influence non‐Muslims' understanding of Halal principles in a country where almost 60 percent of the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to determine the factors that most likely influence non‐Muslims' understanding of Halal principles in a country where almost 60 percent of the population is Muslim.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross‐sectional data were collected through a survey of 800 non‐Muslims in the Klang Valley, via structured questionnaires, to gather information on their understanding of Halal principles and food products. The logit model was applied to determine the extent to which socio environment factors influenced the respondents' understanding and familiarities with Halal principles and Halal food products.

Findings

The results of this study suggest that non‐Muslim consumers are aware of the existence of Halal food in Malaysia. In general, socio‐environmental factors such as mixing with Muslims socially and the presence of advertised Halal food significantly influence non‐Muslims' understanding of Halal principles. The findings also suggest that non‐Muslims understand that Halal principles are also concerned about food safety issues and environmentally friendly ways of doing things.

Research limitations/implications

The research used a quantitative method to analyse 800 non‐Muslim respondents in the Klang Valley only.

Practical implications

The practical implications extend to food policy decision makers and food marketers who might pursue strategies in their distribution and communication efforts which target the growing Halal food market segment among non‐Muslims. Dissemination of information plays an important role in making non‐Muslims improve their understanding of Halal principles.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to investigate the level of understanding of Halal principles among non‐Muslims in Malaysia.

Article
Publication date: 10 March 2022

Farah Syahida Firdaus, Ridho Bramulya Ikhsan and Yudi Fernando

This paper aims to model Muslim consumers' purchase behaviour that predicts the impacts of behavioural factors of spirituality, emotional value, image, trust and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to model Muslim consumers' purchase behaviour that predicts the impacts of behavioural factors of spirituality, emotional value, image, trust and satisfaction on Halal-labelled food products. The model was used among Muslim consumers in Indonesia and France.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted among Indonesian and French Muslim consumers who had bought Halal-labelled food products. The model was examined using Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM) with multi-group analysis (PLS-MGA) to test specific differences between sample groups.

Findings

All proposed hypotheses were accepted, except for the trust in purchasing behaviour. It was not significantly different in the two sample groups. The linkage from image to purchasing behaviour was not significantly related to the French sample group, and emotional value did not influence Halal-labelled food product purchase behaviour in the Indonesian sample group. The MGA results found a significant difference in spirituality, emotional value image and trust among Indonesian and French Muslim consumers.

Practical implications

The guarantee of Halal food through a Halal label can fulfil the spirituality of Muslim consumers in carrying out Allah’s (SWT) command to consume Halal food, creating a product image, trust, satisfaction and emotional value that encourages positive buying behaviour. The finding shows that Muslim spirituality has extended the Islamic marketing literature to predict Muslim consumer behaviour. The company can emphasise in advertisements that the Halal-certified logo reflects the quality of products.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this research is among the early study empirically confirming that spirituality and emotional value are critical domains to predict purchase behaviour between two different groups of Indonesian and French Muslim consumers.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 January 2022

Wisdom Apedo Deku, Jiuhe Wang and Narain Das

Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) do not need only traditional marketing strategies in the dynamic business environment of the manufacturing sector. Entrepreneurial…

Abstract

Purpose

Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) do not need only traditional marketing strategies in the dynamic business environment of the manufacturing sector. Entrepreneurial marketing dimension (EMD) is an alternative marketing approach for SMEs. Therefore, this paper aims to investigate whether EMD innovation has a positive and significant effect on SMEs performance on Ghanaian Halal food and beverages.

Design/methodology/approach

Correlative descriptive research method was used and 432 questionnaires with five-point Likert scale were distributed among owners-managers of manufacturing sectors of Ghanaian Halal food and beverages SMEs producers were chosen by a simple random sampling method. Structural equations modelling structural equations modelling techniques was used to analyse data.

Findings

The result of data analysis indicates a positive and significant effect of EMD on manufacturing SMEs performances of Halal food. Nevertheless, the effect of EMD on the production performance of the aforementioned companies is confirmed positive. The findings also show that production performances of Halal food SMEs result in their financial performance.

Research limitations/implications

The study’s sample is limited to Halal food SMEs manufacturing in Ghana. More research can be done investigating this relationship from different sectors and in Islamic and non-Islamic countries.

Practical implications

This research implies that Halal food SMEs manufacturing producers in a country is imperative in Muslim-minority countries. This study gives a benchmark for the non-Muslim-majority countries which endeavour to embark on the Halal SMEs manufacturing food. Muslim-minority countries that envision to succeed in the global Halal market could emulate Ghana’s approach in branding itself as a recognised non-Muslim-majority country in producing Halal foods. This can be done by implementing innovative, proactive, opportunist, risk-taking and customer-oriented initiatives to achieve better market and innovative performances and higher profits.

Originality/value

This paper fills a knowledge gap by presenting the first comprehensive overview of Halal food SMEs manufacturing performance research that enhances the ongoing discussion in hospitality, entrepreneurship and marketing fields in Islamic and non-Islamic contexts.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 November 2021

Wannasiri Wannasupchue, Siti Fatimah Mohamad, Farah Adibah Che Ishak and Ungku Fatimah Ungku Zainal Abidin

This study aims to explore the challenges of getting halal certification for restaurants in north-eastern Thailand.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the challenges of getting halal certification for restaurants in north-eastern Thailand.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative research approach was adopted to analyse the collected data. The research procedures and the interview questions were examined by the Ethics Committee for Research involving human subjects. In total, 10 restaurant owners were interviewed. Then, the interviews were transcribed, coded and grouped by using thematic analysis while the ATLAS ti. software was used for qualitative data analysis. The theme was finalised by three intercoder agreements.

Findings

The three challenges of obtaining halal certification among restaurants in north-eastern Thailand were the complicated process of getting halal certification, lack of restaurant owner commitment and high halal certification fee.

Research limitations/implications

The number of halal-certified restaurants are limited. Some restaurants refused to renew halal status but their information is still displayed on the halal authority website. Not only the number of restaurants but also time-limited. Further, a quantitative phase for prioritising was suggested.

Practical implications

The study can be beneficial to the halal authority and business holders as the two main stakeholders. The findings can be used to plan or develop halal strategies to increase the quality of halal restaurants. As informants mentioned common challenges, the findings could be applied as guidelines for a new business holder keen on halal implementation.

Originality/value

This research demonstrated the challenges of halal certification in a non-Muslim country, focussing on the north-eastern region of Thailand. The findings will add value to a potential business area. Therefore, the highlighted challenges could provide a novelty and be useful for Muslim marketing.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2021

Dwi Iryaning Handayani, Ilyas Masudin, Abdul Haris and Dian Palupi Restuputri

This paper aims to provide a brief bibliometric review of previous literature reviews in understanding halal suppliers in the food supply chain to achieve halal standards…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a brief bibliometric review of previous literature reviews in understanding halal suppliers in the food supply chain to achieve halal standards from upstream to downstream.

Design/methodology/approach

The method used was a structured literature review sample of during 2008–2020 totalling 142 articles. The authors use the R-package bibliometric and VOSviewer to find out information about journals, articles, authors, citations, keywords and word hierarchy maps.

Findings

The analysis reveals five research clusters: halal supply chain, food supply chain, supply chain integration, halal lifestyle, halal logistics.

Research limitations/implications

This study focuses on articles that discuss halal suppliers in the food supply chain.

Originality/value

Bibliometric reviews related to suppliers in the halal food supply chain in this study will help explore halal suppliers and be useful for researchers and practitioners in their fields as well as assist supplier management in the halal food supply chain.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 13 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 August 2021

Fitra Lestari, Rahmad Kurniawan, Johar Arifin, Muhammad Yasir, Mawardi Muhammad Saleh and Akbarizan

Nowadays, the Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) in Indonesia with the product’s need for halal certification is limited. The purpose of this paper is to measure the…

Abstract

Purpose

Nowadays, the Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) in Indonesia with the product’s need for halal certification is limited. The purpose of this paper is to measure the integrated framework of Halal Good Manufacturing Practices (HGMP) in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and to discover the effect of its performance in the food sector.

Design/methodology/approach

This research conducted focus group discussion in 2 locations with 8 experts and 73 SMEs in the food sector at 2 Indonesian Government agencies.

Findings

The study indicated 6 variables and 40 indicators on HGMP and its implementation in each agency. Two agencies in this research were categorized as poor, which indicated the need to increase the implementation of HGMP. For the SMEs’ business process policy, there were significantly different variables in the building, employee, storage and maintenance.

Research limitations/implications

The implementation of the HGMP is examined in this research based on government regulation. It has not been thoroughly tested based on consumer responses. Furthermore, it can consider consumer satisfaction in the halal framework of GMP.

Practical implications

Government agencies in Indonesia can measure the implementation of HGMP in food sector SMEs and guide SMEs to achieve halal quality standards.

Originality/value

This research provides an integrated framework for measuring HGMP in SMEs guided by the Indonesian Government’s agency in meeting the standard of halal products.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 July 2021

Mas Wahyu Wibowo, Auditia Lintang Sari Putri, Ali Hanafiah, Dudi Permana and Fauziah Sh Ahmad

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate Indonesian Muslim millennials’ decision-making process in purchasing halal food by introducing knowledge variable into the theory…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate Indonesian Muslim millennials’ decision-making process in purchasing halal food by introducing knowledge variable into the theory of planned behavior framework and education level (EL; i.e. low vs high) as the moderating variable.

Design/methodology/approach

There were 400 questionnaires that were distributed to obtain responses from Indonesian Muslim millennials consumers. SmartPLS was used as the structural equation modeling approach to perform the multi-group analysis.

Findings

EL plays an important role that determines Indonesian Muslim millennials’ decision-making process to purchase halal food.

Research limitations/implications

The EL was distinguished based on the Indonesian formal education system, which excluded the religious education system from the analysis.

Practical implications

The information conveyance of halal food product attributes should be conducted gradually according to the millennial consumers’ EL. Millennial consumers with higher EL are more likely to internalize the credence attributes of halal food compared to the lower EL counterpart.

Originality/value

This study found the significant differences in terms of halal food purchase decision-making between the two groups of lower EL and higher EL.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 9 August 2021

Erose Sthapit, Peter Björk and Senthilkumaran Piramanayagam

This study aims to explore non-Muslim tourists’ general halal food preferences, motivations for tasting halal food during their recent trips, positive and negative…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore non-Muslim tourists’ general halal food preferences, motivations for tasting halal food during their recent trips, positive and negative emotions and memorable dimensions associated with their recent halal food experiences after returning from holiday.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using the authors’ personal networks and Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk) using a questionnaire. An email containing a link to the questionnaire was sent to the authors’ personal networks and posted on MTurk in January 2021.

Findings

Of the 311 non-Muslim respondents, more than half considered themselves as food neophiliacs and considered halal food experiences as imperative whilst travelling. However, tasting halal food was not a major travel motivation. Novelty and taste were the two main motivations for tasting halal food whilst at a tourism destination. Emotions elicited by halal food experiences focussed on “joy” and “love”. The proposed conceptual framework for memorable halal food experiences comprises several dimensions: taste, spending time with family and friends, novelty, quality and safety, hospitality, ambience (setting/servicescape) and experiencing others’ culture through food.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to explore non-Muslim tourists’ motives, emotions and memorable dimensions of halal food experiences.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2021

Hardius Usman, Chairy Chairy and Nucke Widowati Kusumo Projo

The purpose of this paper is to: build Muslim consumer decision-making style (MCDMS); analyze the influence of the consumer decision-making style on Muslim behavior to buy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to: build Muslim consumer decision-making style (MCDMS); analyze the influence of the consumer decision-making style on Muslim behavior to buy halal certified food; analyze the impact of religiosity on Muslim behavior in buying halal-certified food and study the role of religiosity in the relationship between MCDMS and Muslim behavior in buying halal certified food.

Design/methodology/approach

This study’s target population is the Muslim Indonesian population age at least 18 years old. The self-administered survey method is carried out based on convenience and snowball sampling techniques and the questionnaire is distributed online. This study collects data from 396 Muslim respondents in Indonesia through an online survey. Factor analysis and regression with interaction variables are applied to test the research hypothesis statistically.

Findings

This study reveals several results: MCDMS produces 10 dimensions; halal consciousness is an important dimension; the perfectionist/high-quality conscious and price-conscious, has a significant negative effect on the intention to buy halal-certified food; the halal consciousness and the recreational/hedonic conscious have a significant positive effect on the intention to buy halal certified food; religiosity has a significant positive impact directly on the intention to purchase halal-certified food; Religiosity positively moderates the impact of a perfectionist/high-quality conscious and price-conscious on the intention to buy halal-certified food.

Originality/value

This paper will build an MCDMS by adding the dimensions of halal consciousness. The author has not found literature about MCDMS. This research will also study the impact of MCDMS and religiosity on the intention to buy halal-certified food, as well as will study the role of religiosity in relationships between Muslim decision-making styles and intention to buy halal-certified food. Similar research is still very limited in marketing literature.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Adnan Ali, Afzaal Ali, Guo Xiaoling, Mehkar Sherwani and Sikander Hussain

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the determinants of halal meat consumption within the population of Chinese Muslims in China using the theory of planned…

1906

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the determinants of halal meat consumption within the population of Chinese Muslims in China using the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) as a conceptual framework. The role of self-identity as a Muslim, dietary acculturation in the host culture, moral obligation to purchase halal meat and trust on the authenticity of halal meat are explored.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional data were collected through a survey with 378 Chinese Muslims, currently living in Beijing and Xian cities. Data were analysed by means of correlations and stepwise multiple regressions to test the model and the moderating effects of self-identity, dietary acculturation, moral obligation and trust on behavioural intention.

Findings

A positive personal attitude towards the consumption of halal meat, personal conviction, motivation to comply, perceived control over consuming halal meat and perceived availability of halal meat predict the intention to eat halal meat among Chinese Muslims.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include the focus on only four individual characteristics related to religious food consumption, namely, self-identity, dietary acculturation, moral obligation and trust. Additional individual characteristics such as individualism-collectivism and involvement or values could improve the predictive power of the model.

Practical implications

Practical implications extend to food marketers and food policy decision-makers who might pursue identity, acculturation, trustworthiness and moral obligation-related strategies in their distribution and communication efforts targeted at the growing halal food market segments across China and worldwide.

Originality/value

The current study addresses the important limitation of previous studies regarding the inclusion of additional possible individual characteristics such as moral obligation and trust in the TPB model to investigate the determinants of halal meat consumption within a food-religion context.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000