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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Golnaz Rezai, Zainalabidin Mohamed and Mad Nasir Shamsudin

The aim of this paper is to determine the factors that most likely influence non‐Muslims' understanding of Halal principles in a country where almost 60 percent of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to determine the factors that most likely influence non‐Muslims' understanding of Halal principles in a country where almost 60 percent of the population is Muslim.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross‐sectional data were collected through a survey of 800 non‐Muslims in the Klang Valley, via structured questionnaires, to gather information on their understanding of Halal principles and food products. The logit model was applied to determine the extent to which socio environment factors influenced the respondents' understanding and familiarities with Halal principles and Halal food products.

Findings

The results of this study suggest that non‐Muslim consumers are aware of the existence of Halal food in Malaysia. In general, socio‐environmental factors such as mixing with Muslims socially and the presence of advertised Halal food significantly influence non‐Muslims' understanding of Halal principles. The findings also suggest that non‐Muslims understand that Halal principles are also concerned about food safety issues and environmentally friendly ways of doing things.

Research limitations/implications

The research used a quantitative method to analyse 800 non‐Muslim respondents in the Klang Valley only.

Practical implications

The practical implications extend to food policy decision makers and food marketers who might pursue strategies in their distribution and communication efforts which target the growing Halal food market segment among non‐Muslims. Dissemination of information plays an important role in making non‐Muslims improve their understanding of Halal principles.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to investigate the level of understanding of Halal principles among non‐Muslims in Malaysia.

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2021

Mas Wahyu Wibowo, Auditia Lintang Sari Putri, Ali Hanafiah, Dudi Permana and Fauziah Sh Ahmad

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate Indonesian Muslim millennials’ decision-making process in purchasing halal food by introducing knowledge variable into the theory…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate Indonesian Muslim millennials’ decision-making process in purchasing halal food by introducing knowledge variable into the theory of planned behavior framework and education level (EL; i.e. low vs high) as the moderating variable.

Design/methodology/approach

There were 400 questionnaires that were distributed to obtain responses from Indonesian Muslim millennials consumers. SmartPLS was used as the structural equation modeling approach to perform the multi-group analysis.

Findings

EL plays an important role that determines Indonesian Muslim millennials’ decision-making process to purchase halal food.

Research limitations/implications

The EL was distinguished based on the Indonesian formal education system, which excluded the religious education system from the analysis.

Practical implications

The information conveyance of halal food product attributes should be conducted gradually according to the millennial consumers’ EL. Millennial consumers with higher EL are more likely to internalize the credence attributes of halal food compared to the lower EL counterpart.

Originality/value

This study found the significant differences in terms of halal food purchase decision-making between the two groups of lower EL and higher EL.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2021

Hardius Usman, Chairy Chairy and Nucke Widowati Kusumo Projo

The purpose of this paper is to: build Muslim consumer decision-making style (MCDMS); analyze the influence of the consumer decision-making style on Muslim behavior to buy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to: build Muslim consumer decision-making style (MCDMS); analyze the influence of the consumer decision-making style on Muslim behavior to buy halal certified food; analyze the impact of religiosity on Muslim behavior in buying halal-certified food and study the role of religiosity in the relationship between MCDMS and Muslim behavior in buying halal certified food.

Design/methodology/approach

This study’s target population is the Muslim Indonesian population age at least 18 years old. The self-administered survey method is carried out based on convenience and snowball sampling techniques and the questionnaire is distributed online. This study collects data from 396 Muslim respondents in Indonesia through an online survey. Factor analysis and regression with interaction variables are applied to test the research hypothesis statistically.

Findings

This study reveals several results: MCDMS produces 10 dimensions; halal consciousness is an important dimension; the perfectionist/high-quality conscious and price-conscious, has a significant negative effect on the intention to buy halal-certified food; the halal consciousness and the recreational/hedonic conscious have a significant positive effect on the intention to buy halal certified food; religiosity has a significant positive impact directly on the intention to purchase halal-certified food; Religiosity positively moderates the impact of a perfectionist/high-quality conscious and price-conscious on the intention to buy halal-certified food.

Originality/value

This paper will build an MCDMS by adding the dimensions of halal consciousness. The author has not found literature about MCDMS. This research will also study the impact of MCDMS and religiosity on the intention to buy halal-certified food, as well as will study the role of religiosity in relationships between Muslim decision-making styles and intention to buy halal-certified food. Similar research is still very limited in marketing literature.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2020

Norliza Katuk, Ku Ruhana Ku-Mahamud, Kalsom Kayat, Mohd. Noor Abdul Hamid, Nur Haryani Zakaria and Ayi Purbasari

Halal tourism is a subset of tourism activities geared towards Muslim which are aligned with the Islamic principles. As a response to this, many food operators have…

Abstract

Purpose

Halal tourism is a subset of tourism activities geared towards Muslim which are aligned with the Islamic principles. As a response to this, many food operators have realised the importance of having a halal certification to establish a better market position. In the context of Indonesia, it is yet to be known what attitudes the food operators have towards halal certification and what attributes characterised those who have obtained the certification. Therefore, this study aims to examine the attributes of food operators and their attitudes towards halal certification in Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey and structured interview were conducted on 298 food operators in Bandung, a city in Indonesia, between August and December 2018. Seven hypotheses were proposed and tested to evaluate the association between halal certification and food operators’ attributes and their attitudes towards it.

Findings

The results of the study suggested that food operators who had halal certification can be characterised by the number of branches the businesses have, the knowledge of halal tourism and knowledge on the market segment. However, the age of their business was found not related to halal certification. In terms of attitudes, the study found that performance beliefs, intention to apply and target market segment had associated with halal certification.

Practical implications

The outcomes of the study could provide information to entities and agencies involved in the tourism industry that consider targeting Muslim travellers as their market segment. Halal certification could be an approach to facilitate tourism marketing and consequently increase the performance of food-related business sectors.

Originality/value

This study provides evidence that could lead to a better understanding of the attributes of food operators and their attitudes towards halal certification in the context of Indonesia’s tourism industry.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2020

Mahmut Selami Akın and Abdullah Okumuş

The study aims to examine the consumers’ attitudes toward halal food products based on tripartite model. Regarding this, the effect of halal food awareness, perceived risk…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to examine the consumers’ attitudes toward halal food products based on tripartite model. Regarding this, the effect of halal food awareness, perceived risk and behavioral tendency on attitudes toward halal food products are investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

343 valid questionnaires were obtained. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were performed to ensure content validity, and structural equation modeling was progressed to test the relationships among variables through IBM SPSS Statistics 22.0 and AMOS 23.0 software.

Findings

Research validates the tripartite model of attitude and suggests attitude toward halal food is formed by predominantly behavioral tendency and partially psychological drivers, rather than cognitive elements.

Research limitations/implications

The characteristics of participants should be different and larger sample may provide some other results. The product or service context should be different, for example, halal cosmetic, halal hygienic, halal tourism.

Practical implications

Trigger messages may put forward in marketing communications activity for halal food products marketing and halal certificated food brands need to establish their distribution networks effectively to get closer with consumers.

Originality/value

Attitudes towards halal products represent the key driver of consumer behavior for the development of marketing strategies in certified halal firms addressing both domestic and foreign markets. It is the first study examining Turkish consumer attitudes toward halal food product using tripartite model in the field of halal consumption behavior. The paper offers a different methodological framework and it could be potentially of interest for scholars, marketers and policy makers.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2020

Muhammad Asim Shahzad, Dong Jun, Gull Noor and Ahsan Zubair

Within the religious context, purchase and consumption decisions of halal food is different significantly. The purpose of this study is to emphasize the investigation of…

Abstract

Purpose

Within the religious context, purchase and consumption decisions of halal food is different significantly. The purpose of this study is to emphasize the investigation of causation of halal food consumption (HFC) within China. Being a Muslim, the importance of habit, religious self-identity, moral attitude and individualism to the consumption of halal food in the host-culture is examined.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was placed and cross-sectional data consisted of 199 Muslim participants were collected, primarily from Beijing current capital of China. Data were examined by SPSS and PLS-3 to assess the model and moderating effects of individualism on HFC.

Findings

The results of the research show that moral attitude, habit and religious self-identity in the presence of individualism as a moderator have a significant and positive attitude toward HFC.

Practical implications

The halal food industry can communicate the Muslim community through tag (Halal), which may help Muslims with different individualism and inspire them to make their choices.

Originality/value

The research can be valued by the strategy makers of the food company, as well as the food industry that might pursue individualism in the communication and supply process while targeting the halal food sector in China and worldwide.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2020

Yusaini Hisham Mohamed, Abdul Rahman Abdul Rahim and Azanizawati Ma'aram

The purpose of this study is to outline the results of the empirical testing in the field of halal food supply chain and halal integrity assurance (HIA), as well as to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to outline the results of the empirical testing in the field of halal food supply chain and halal integrity assurance (HIA), as well as to provide a research framework of their relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on the exploratory research paper using quantitative data collection to empirically experimented with concepts and provide practical solutions for halal industry players to optimize their halal food supply chain integrity assurance.

Findings

The findings show the halal supply chain of the food and beverage industry has a significant effect on HIA. The results also suggest the halal industry with a high focus on supply chain business processes and supply chain network structure are expected to have better HIA.

Research limitations/implications

As this study only focuses on the halal industry in Malaysia specifically on food and beverages, its findings cannot be generalized to other categories. Issues of applicability of this study to other countries also need to be considered.

Practical implications

This study addresses the assurance of halal integrity is a crucial element in managing a halal food supply chain in the halal industry. It has empirically identified the important elements to strengthen halal food supply chain integrity assurance in the halal industry.

Social implications

It is important to manage knowledge, commitment and trust in any halal organization as a catalyst for HIA. This study presents a better understanding of the halal concept application in society.

Originality/value

There is a lack of empirical study on halal food supply chain integrity assurance even though the issue of HIA is widely discussed in the halal industry. Thus, this study has used an industry survey to empirically experimented with concepts and provide practical contributions to enhance halal food supply chain integrity assurance.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2019

Yusuf Hassan and Jatin Pandey

Religion plays an important role in promoting and inhibiting consumption of goods and services. Halal food, for instance, represents one such food permitted by Islam…

Abstract

Purpose

Religion plays an important role in promoting and inhibiting consumption of goods and services. Halal food, for instance, represents one such food permitted by Islam. Within a broader category of consumers for religiously sanctioned products such as halal food, young consumers represent an important segment, as they have a high lifetime value, thereby requiring special attention. This study aims to identify and examine individual and social factors that can foster young consumer’s engagement for halal products.

Design/methodology/approach

An inductive research approach using the Gioia method has been used to develop broader themes for discussion. The authors have also proposed a model for engaging young consumers for religiously sanctioned dietary products.

Findings

The paper provides empirical insights into the interplay of identities and value sources that encourages or forbids consumer engagement for halal products.

Practical implications

Globally, the halal food industry has been estimated to be worth $580bn, and it is growing at an average rate of 7 per cent annually. Marketers, thus, need to be aware of diverse consumers’ needs to provide a customized offering; they have to cater to adherent customers of these religiously sanctioned products by being sensitive to intricacies that make such food items consumable. The study will help marketers to better align their promotional strategies with the needs and requirement of young consumers.

Originality/value

In this paper, the authors have operationalized repeated interaction and associated consumption in the context of halal food to understand how religion and other factors play a role in strengthening or weakening consumer engagement. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no study has been done to understand young consumer’s engagement for halal food products in the Indian context. India being a land of multi-religion and multi-culture, such studies can provide rich insights.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2020

Muhammad Muflih and Juliana Juliana

This paper aims to estimate the influence of spirituality on halal-labeled food shopping behavior both directly and through the mediating roles of image, trust and satisfaction.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to estimate the influence of spirituality on halal-labeled food shopping behavior both directly and through the mediating roles of image, trust and satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Using quantitative methods, this research analyzed the responses to questionnaires distributed to 212 respondents from Bandung, Indonesia. To prove the hypotheses, the collected data were analyzed by partial least square (SEM-PLS) using SmartPLS.

Findings

This research shows that the direct relationship between spirituality and halal-labeled food shopping behavior was insignificant. However, the relationship between spirituality and halal food shopping behavior became indirectly significant through the mediating roles of image, trust and satisfaction. This finding confirms that image, trust and satisfaction are influential factors in the increased shopping behavior of consumers who choose halal-labeled foods.

Practical implications

To increase the shopping behavior of Muslims for halal-labeled food, halal food companies need to expand the halal label campaign to electronic and social media. Besides, halal food companies need to develop the accountability of food quality to ensure that the halal food products meet the health and safety standards expected by the public. Spiritual education is also required to harmonize the love for God and the food choices approved by God.

Originality/value

This study is the first in testing the influence of spirituality on halal-labeled food shopping behavior both directly and through the mediating roles of image, trust and satisfaction. It successfully revealed the strengths and weaknesses of spirituality in influencing the behavior of halal food shopping.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Adnan Ali, Afzaal Ali, Guo Xiaoling, Mehkar Sherwani and Sikander Hussain

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the determinants of halal meat consumption within the population of Chinese Muslims in China using the theory of planned…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the determinants of halal meat consumption within the population of Chinese Muslims in China using the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) as a conceptual framework. The role of self-identity as a Muslim, dietary acculturation in the host culture, moral obligation to purchase halal meat and trust on the authenticity of halal meat are explored.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional data were collected through a survey with 378 Chinese Muslims, currently living in Beijing and Xian cities. Data were analysed by means of correlations and stepwise multiple regressions to test the model and the moderating effects of self-identity, dietary acculturation, moral obligation and trust on behavioural intention.

Findings

A positive personal attitude towards the consumption of halal meat, personal conviction, motivation to comply, perceived control over consuming halal meat and perceived availability of halal meat predict the intention to eat halal meat among Chinese Muslims.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include the focus on only four individual characteristics related to religious food consumption, namely, self-identity, dietary acculturation, moral obligation and trust. Additional individual characteristics such as individualism-collectivism and involvement or values could improve the predictive power of the model.

Practical implications

Practical implications extend to food marketers and food policy decision-makers who might pursue identity, acculturation, trustworthiness and moral obligation-related strategies in their distribution and communication efforts targeted at the growing halal food market segments across China and worldwide.

Originality/value

The current study addresses the important limitation of previous studies regarding the inclusion of additional possible individual characteristics such as moral obligation and trust in the TPB model to investigate the determinants of halal meat consumption within a food-religion context.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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