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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2020

Siti Hasnah Hassan, Norizan Mat Saad, Tajul Ariffin Masron and Siti Insyirah Ali

Buy Muslim’s First campaign started with the primary aim of urging the Muslim community to be more vigilant about halal or Shariah-compliant products, leading to a number…

Abstract

Purpose

Buy Muslim’s First campaign started with the primary aim of urging the Muslim community to be more vigilant about halal or Shariah-compliant products, leading to a number of halal-related issues, triggered by the exploitation or misuse of the halal logo in Malaysia. The purpose of this study is to gain an understanding of the purchase intention for Muslim-made products by applying the theory of planned behaviour (TPB). Halal consciousness was integrated as a moderating influence on the purchase intention of Muslim-made products.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection was performed through a self-administered questionnaire which was distributed through convenience sampling method. Therefore, a useful sample comprising 152 Malay Muslim participants aged over 18 was collected. For hypothesis testing, hierarchical multiple regression analysis was implemented.

Findings

It was found that the participants’ attitudes towards the purchase of Muslim-made products and their perceived behavioural control significantly influenced their purchase intention, but the subjective norm did not impact this intention. Furthermore, halal consciousness moderated the relationships among all the independent and dependent variables. Halal consciousness moderated the relationship between participants’ attitudes towards Muslim-made products and their perceived behavioural control towards the purchase intention; however, this moderation did not occur through the subjective norm and the purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

As the findings of this study were limited to the Muslim population in Malaysia, it might be difficult to generalize for other nations that have no similarities with the Malaysian Muslim culture.

Practical implications

The findings of this study may support Muslims to implement more effective marketing strategies that attract the target customers to purchase Muslim-made products. Effective promotion may attract potential customers as well.

Originality/value

The halal consciousness among Muslim consumers is important for the moderation and prediction of consumers’ intention to purchase Muslim-made products.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 December 2020

Samshul-Amry Abdul-Latif and Asmat-Nizam Abdul-Talib

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of consumer ethnocentrism and consumer animosity at the ethnic level. This study examines both effects on an ethnic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of consumer ethnocentrism and consumer animosity at the ethnic level. This study examines both effects on an ethnic majority’s consumption of an ethnic minority’s products and services, focusing on the relationship between two ethnic groups in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

The relationship between the constructs were analyzed using the co-variance-based structural equation modeling techniques with analysis of a moment structures version 21. Self-administered questionnaires were obtained from 325 Malay respondents in 2 Malaysian cities.

Findings

The results suggest that ethnic-based consumer ethnocentrism can negatively affect product judgment and product judgment can affect consumers’ willingness to buy. Two significant findings were rejected as the directions of the results were not as hypothesized.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could study other ethnic groups of different countries using specific ethnic related products and/or brands.

Originality/value

This research suggests that ethnic-based ethnocentrism and ethnic-based animosity are important factors for businesses to consider as both can affect ethnic consumers’ purchasing behavior. Depending on ethnic consumers’ perception toward a brand, a manager may face either an opportunity or a challenge.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 26 February 2021

Claire Eloise Sherman, Damien Arthur and Justin Thomas

The purpose of this study is to examine the causes of consumer stockpiling by Muslim consumers during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Specifically, this paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the causes of consumer stockpiling by Muslim consumers during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Specifically, this paper examines exposure to COVID-19 information and its relationship with panic buying directly, indirectly through anxiety and as moderated by resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

In the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic, this study surveys 1,006 Muslims from a sample of 1,392 UAE citizens and residents about their exposure to COVID-19 information, anxiety, resilience and panic buying.

Findings

Greater exposure to COVID-19 information had a direct effect on panic buying yet a much weaker indirect effect through increased anxiety. This mediating effect is only significant at moderate to high levels of resilience, suggesting panic buying is a particular coping response of resilient individuals who experience anxiety after greater exposure to COVID-19 information. Anxiety was found to increase panic buying above that directly related to COVID-19 information exposure.

Social implications

Findings provide some guidance for policymakers where a nuanced approach to building and directing resilience and in directing information flows are needed to curtail panic buying within their Muslim populations.

Originality/value

While the phenomenon of consumer stockpiling is referred to as panic buying, the findings suggest that anxiety plays a smaller role in the process than preparedness prompted by crisis-related information exposure. Furthermore, this is the first study to date to specifically examine COVID-19 related panic buying among a Muslim population.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2021

Hardius Usman, Chairy Chairy and Nucke Widowati Kusumo Projo

The purpose of this paper is to: build Muslim consumer decision-making style (MCDMS); analyze the influence of the consumer decision-making style on Muslim behavior to buy

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to: build Muslim consumer decision-making style (MCDMS); analyze the influence of the consumer decision-making style on Muslim behavior to buy halal certified food; analyze the impact of religiosity on Muslim behavior in buying halal-certified food and study the role of religiosity in the relationship between MCDMS and Muslim behavior in buying halal certified food.

Design/methodology/approach

This study’s target population is the Muslim Indonesian population age at least 18 years old. The self-administered survey method is carried out based on convenience and snowball sampling techniques and the questionnaire is distributed online. This study collects data from 396 Muslim respondents in Indonesia through an online survey. Factor analysis and regression with interaction variables are applied to test the research hypothesis statistically.

Findings

This study reveals several results: MCDMS produces 10 dimensions; halal consciousness is an important dimension; the perfectionist/high-quality conscious and price-conscious, has a significant negative effect on the intention to buy halal-certified food; the halal consciousness and the recreational/hedonic conscious have a significant positive effect on the intention to buy halal certified food; religiosity has a significant positive impact directly on the intention to purchase halal-certified food; Religiosity positively moderates the impact of a perfectionist/high-quality conscious and price-conscious on the intention to buy halal-certified food.

Originality/value

This paper will build an MCDMS by adding the dimensions of halal consciousness. The author has not found literature about MCDMS. This research will also study the impact of MCDMS and religiosity on the intention to buy halal-certified food, as well as will study the role of religiosity in relationships between Muslim decision-making styles and intention to buy halal-certified food. Similar research is still very limited in marketing literature.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2021

Arun Kumar Tarofder, Umme Salma Sultana, Raisal Ismail, Suha Fouad Salem and Adiza Alhassan Musah

The purpose of this study is two-fold: classifying non-Muslim halal fashion buyers by applying quantitative techniques and identifying the persuading determinants of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is two-fold: classifying non-Muslim halal fashion buyers by applying quantitative techniques and identifying the persuading determinants of the non-Muslim women’ halal fashion buying behaviour (HFBB).

Design/methodology/approach

By adapting items from prior studies, a structured questionnaire was developed and distributed face-to-face to various Muslim fashion stores in Malaysia. After a one-month effort, 221 responses were obtained from non-Muslim consumers by using convenience sampling. Next, a clustering analysis was used to classify them from a contrasting perspective. Finally, regression and Andrew F. Hayes’s process procedures were applied to examine the three independent variables’ effect and the moderating variables.

Findings

The results revealed the characteristic behaviour of the non-Muslim women explicitly, which is related to their halal fashion purchasing decision. Based on the ANOVA results, there were different motives for buying halal fashion by non-Muslim women. Additionally, it was found that the most crucial determinants for non-Muslim’s HFBB are “cultural adaptation”, albeit, there is no substantial proof of a significant moderating effect of age and income on the consumers.

Research limitations/implications

These discoveries are advantageous for halal fashion retailers and provide an appealing domain for further investigations in the context of the global halal study.

Practical implications

This study provided an idea for an untapped segment on the halal fashion sellers’ segmentation and positioning strategy. The study’s results suggested specific managerial and practical recommendation that the sellers can use to attract non-Muslim consumers.

Originality/value

This study was amongst the uncommon investigations within the halal fashion context that will enlighten the managers’ selling strategy on the most neglected market segment. The results of this study provided an empirical understanding of how to sell halal fashion to non-Muslim consumers.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2018

Shadma Shahid, Faheem Ahmed and Uzma Hasan

India accounts for the third-largest Muslim population in the world after Indonesia and Pakistan. The previous studies about halal consumption have focused on the “food…

Abstract

Purpose

India accounts for the third-largest Muslim population in the world after Indonesia and Pakistan. The previous studies about halal consumption have focused on the “food and money industry” only. Muslim consumers are prohibited from using alcohol, pork and other items in any form; the rising awareness among Muslims has led to the rapid growth in demand of halal cosmetic products around the globe. This paper aims to present a framework of halal consumers’ purchase and explores the factors that Indian consumers consider while buying halal cosmetics.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors carried out qualitative research (focus group discussion and in-depth interviews) in Delhi, Mumbai and Hyderabad to gain deeper insight from the respondents.

Findings

The study found that religiosity and increasing awareness about halal products acts as an influencer for individuals’ halal products consumption along with halal certification and growing education level of Muslim consumers.

Originality/value

The paper has been developed based on the original research work carried out among the halal Muslim consumers in the major Muslim population in metropolitan cities of Hyderabad, Mumbai and Delhi over the past year.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2021

Phattharatharaporn Singkheeprapha, Zulfiqar Ali Jumani and Sasiwemon Sukhabot

In southeast Asia, international companies are growing to serve customers with multiple faiths. This study aims to focus on Thailand and it is one of Southeast Asia’s…

Abstract

Purpose

In southeast Asia, international companies are growing to serve customers with multiple faiths. This study aims to focus on Thailand and it is one of Southeast Asia’s nations and it has Muslim minority customers. To represent Thai Muslim companies, Thai Muslims are marketing their goods by bearing the tagline “we are Islamic”. Scholars described it as “Islamic brands”. This research describes the significant feature of Islamic brands between Thai Muslim people. It examines, which of the Islamic brand dimensions motivates Thai customers towards buying Islamic brands.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study’s conceptual model was the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) and 281 Thai Muslims responded via a standardised survey. The data was collected from four southern Thailand provinces (Narathiwat, Pattani, Satun and Yala) and the statistical application Smart-partial least-squares 3 was used for data analysis.

Findings

The most significant factor motivating Thai Muslims towards purchasing Islamic brands is the customer’s Islamic brand. The second factor was the Islamic brands by compliance and Islamic brands by country of origin.

Research limitations/implications

Three regions in Thailand have been researched, as well as the results concentrate only on three Islamic brand attitudes as independent variables and the development of behavioural expectations of TPB. This research also presents a model that could help understand the consumer perceptions about Islamic brands and established brands amongst various consumers.

Practical implications

The present research applies to small companies and multi-national businesses, as it illuminates and recognises the image of Islamic brands and suggests the preferences of customers in selecting the brand of Islamic brand.

Originality/value

The current study aims to explain Thai Muslim customers’ buying behavioural intentions while purchasing Islamic brands in Thailand.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2019

Abdalla Mohamed Bashir

The purpose of this paper is to determine the factors that affect foreign consumers’ purchase intention towards purchasing halal food products in South Africa. These…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the factors that affect foreign consumers’ purchase intention towards purchasing halal food products in South Africa. These factors are halal awareness, halal logo and attitude, which are important factors in affecting the intention of consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via a self-questionnaire with a sample of 230 foreign consumers. For analysing these data, a structural equation modelling technique was used in this study.

Findings

Based on the study’s results, all factors significantly influence foreign consumers’ intention towards purchasing halal food products and, subsequently, their buying behaviour. Interestingly, the study found that attitudes and halal awareness of non-Muslim consumers are very high compared with those of the Muslim consumers. Although the study addressed halal food consumers, most of the respondents participated in the study were non-Muslims and the majority of them were Christians.

Research limitations/implications

The respondents were only limited to the Cape Town city in South Africa, and the focus was only on five variables related to halal food consumers, namely, halal awareness halal logo, attitude, purchase intention and buying behaviour.

Social implications

This study can be used to develop halal food products to attract both Muslim and non-Muslim consumers, who are foreigners to a particular country.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first studies seeking to determine the factors that affect foreign consumers with regard to the purchase of halal food products in South Africa. It is regarded one of the first attempts to determine halal awareness, halal logo and attitude and how purchase intention and buying behaviour can be influenced.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Claire H. Griffiths

The purpose of this monograph is to present the first English translation of a unique French colonial report on women living under colonial rule in West Africa.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this monograph is to present the first English translation of a unique French colonial report on women living under colonial rule in West Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

The issue begins with a discussion of the contribution this report makes to the history of social development policy in Africa, and how it serves the on‐going critique of colonisation. This is followed by the English translation of the original report held in the National Archives of Senegal. The translation is accompanied by explanatory notes, translator’s comments, a glossary of African and technical terms, and a bibliography.

Findings

The discussion highlights contemporary social development policies and practices which featured in identical or similar forms in French colonial social policy.

Practical implications

As the report demonstrates, access to basic education and improving maternal/infant health care have dominated the social development agenda for women in sub‐Saharan Africa for over a century, and will continue to do so in the foreseeable future in the Millennium Development Goals which define the international community’s agenda for social development to 2015. The parallels between colonial and post‐colonial social policies in Africa raise questions about the philosophical and cultural foundations of contemporary social development policy in Africa and the direction policy is following in the 21st century.

Originality/value

Though the discussion adopts a consciously postcolonial perspective, the report that follows presents a consciously colonial view of the “Other”. Given the parallels identified here between contemporary and colonial policy‐making, this can only add to the value of the document in exploring the values that underpin contemporary social development practice.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 26 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Mohammed M. Almossawi

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of religion on the effectiveness of product packages in attracting customers’ attention, and forming their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of religion on the effectiveness of product packages in attracting customers’ attention, and forming their attitudes, preferences, and buying decisions. In other words, the study aims at finding out how do Muslims respond to product packages including elements believed to disagree with the Islamic values, in this study referred to as “contentious packages.”

Design/methodology/approach

To test the five hypotheses, the study recruited 300 young Muslims in Bahrain, chosen from the population of 14,000 students of the University of Bahrain aged between 20 and 25, 26 percent male and 74 percent female. The primary data were collected through personal interviews with the selected sample, using a specially designed questionnaire. The questionnaire included ten questions covering two personal questions for age and gender and eight other questions attempting to find out Muslims’ responses to contentious packages in terms of attention, attitudes, buying intention, company image, and word-of-mouth.

Findings

Findings indicate that use of contentious packaging runs a high risk of tarnishing a company’s reputation and appeal. Muslims who live by Shari’a and the dictates of the Kuran will consider such companies to be promoters of fornication, and will therefore boycott such companies in order to prevent them from corrupting the purity and piety of the community. If advertising firms continue to fail in recognizing the profundity of these beliefs within Muslim communities, both their fiscal success and reputation run the risk of suffering substantial damage.

Practical implications

The findings of this study send six important messages to multinational companies doing business in Islamic countries. First, Islam governs all aspects of Muslim life, including consumer behavior. Second, to prosper in Islamic countries, choose packaging that does not contradict or offend the principles and values of Islam. Third, recognize that much packaging that has proven to be effective in Western countries will not be successful in Islamic countries due to vastly different cultural environments. Fourth, a contentious package may result in a steep drop in the sales. Fifth, using contentious packages may damage the reputation. Sixth, you can attract more Muslims by using non-contentious packages.

Originality/value

This paper is of great value to companies who wish to expand their practice in Muslim countries. Its findings promise to improve advertising standards and to increase both company profits and customer satisfaction.

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