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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2021

Sinan Çavuşoĝlu, Bülent Demirağ, Yakup Durmaz and Gökhan Tutuş

This research aims to find out whether intrinsic and extrinsic religiosity affect product attitude functions (value-expressive, social-adjustive).

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to find out whether intrinsic and extrinsic religiosity affect product attitude functions (value-expressive, social-adjustive).

Design/methodology/approach

The population of the research consists of Muslim consumers in Turkey and Christian consumers in Portugal. Using the convenience sampling method, the data was obtained from 800 questionnaire forms which consist of 400 forms filled by Muslim consumers in Turkey and 400 forms filled by Christian consumers in Portugal. Smart PLS 3 (Partial Least Squares) statistical program was used to test hypotheses.

Findings

Results of the analyses show that the intrinsic religiosity of Muslim Consumers living in Turkey and Christian consumers living in Portugal negatively affects the value-expressive and social adjustive attitude. Extrinsic religiosity, on the other hand, has been found to have a positive effect on the functions of value-expressive and social-adjustive attitudes within the consumers of both countries.

Originality/value

There are studies on religiosity and consumer attitudes in the Turkish literature (Kurtoglu and Çiçek, 2013; Uyar et al., 2020; Demirag et al., 2020). Religiosity dimensions (intrinsic/extrinsic religiosity); however, have been neglected in the Turkish literature. This study provides a detailed evaluation of the effect of these dimensions on the dependent variable. Additionally, this study emphasizes the relational aspect of attitude dependent variable and religiosity dimensions by approaching it through the context of value-expressive and social-adjustive attitude. Thus, it is aimed to help practitioners and the literature gain a different perspective by referring to the attitude functions whose foundations were laid in the studies of Smith et al. (1956), Katz (1960) and strengthened in studies like Wilcox et al. (2009). By comparing two different religions, the study results are analyzed in the context of different regions and cultures. This comparison can be beneficial both for local and international investors as religious and cultural factors play an important role in local and cultural investment decisions. The results of this study are thought to contribute to the consumer behavior literature and to public authorities in terms of evaluating the level of religiosity. In addition, this study can have practical results for the practitioners in both Portugal and Turkey.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2021

Wilson Weixun Li, Alvin Chung Man Leung and Wei T. Yue

The anonymity of the Internet supports an increasing number of deviant behaviors such as secret affairs. This paper aims to investigate whether religiosity has a negative…

Abstract

Purpose

The anonymity of the Internet supports an increasing number of deviant behaviors such as secret affairs. This paper aims to investigate whether religiosity has a negative relationship with the incidence of secret affairs in cyberspace and how it moderates the substitution effect between the use of online and off-line channels for such deviant behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors constructed a cross-sectional county-level dataset containing data on US religious adherents' ratios and actual expenditures on a social website related to extramarital affairs. The data were analyzed by ordinary least squares and two-stage least squares regression models.

Findings

In general, religiosity has a negative relationship with secret affairs in cyberspace. It also moderates the relationship between using online (secret affairs websites) and off-line (entertainment facilities) channels for extramarital affairs. The deterrent effect of religiosity is weakened in religious communities with diversified religious teachings/structures and stricter requirements.

Originality/value

This work enriches the understanding of the role of religiosity in online deviant behaviors and provides essential insights for policymakers (e.g. in relation to spillover effects of social norms in cyberspace).

Details

Internet Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2021

Denni Arli, Tuyet-Mai Nguyen and Phong Tuan Nham

There is a perception that non-religious consumers are less ethical than religious consumers. Studies found prejudices against atheists around the world and assumed that…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a perception that non-religious consumers are less ethical than religious consumers. Studies found prejudices against atheists around the world and assumed that those who committed unethical behavior were more likely to be atheists. Hence, first, the purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of consumers’ intrinsic religiosity, extrinsic religiosity and atheism on consumers’ ethical beliefs. Second, this study attempts to segment consumers and identify differences between these segments.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from 235 study participants in the USA and 531 in Vietnam. Subsequently, a two-step cluster approach was used to identify segments within these samples.

Findings

The study results show consumers’ intrinsic religiosity negatively influences all consumers’ unethical beliefs. Similarly, atheism also negatively influences all consumers’ unethical beliefs. This study also complements other studies exploring consumer ethics in developing countries. In addition, the segmentation analysis produced unique segments. The results from both samples (USA and Vietnam) indicated that non-religious consumers are less likely to accept various unethical behaviors compared to religious consumers. Religious consumers are not necessarily more ethical and atheism consumers are not necessarily less ethical. In the end, are implications for business ethics, religious and non-religious leaders on how to view the impact of beliefs on consumer ethical behaviors.

Originality/value

This is one of the first few studies investigating the impact of atheism on consumer ethics. The results of this study further extend the knowledge of study in consumer ethics by comparing consumers’ religiosity and atheism.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2021

Chijioke Nwachukwu, Helena Chládková, Richard Selase Agboga and Hieu Minh Vu

The purpose of this study was to enhance our understanding of the connection between religiosity, employee empowerment and employee engagement.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to enhance our understanding of the connection between religiosity, employee empowerment and employee engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the social exchange theory, a framework of hypotheses is developed that focusses on religiosity, employee empowerment and their impact on employee engagement. This research employed a quantitative survey and data obtained from 232 adults working in companies in Accra Ghana.

Findings

The results suggest that religiosity dimensions (extrinsic and intrinsic) have a counterbalancing effect on employee engagement dimensions (intellectual and affective). Employee empowerment predicts both intellectual and affective engagement.

Research limitations/implications

This study has some limitations which provide opportunities for more research. First, the study is cross-sectional and focusses on employees in selected companies in Accra Ghana. More so, the participants were a convenience, majorly men (only 28% were women). This limits the generalisability of the findings and our confidence in ascertaining the “cause” and “effect” in the relationship. The present paper used a quantitative research approach; mixed method may provide in-depth insight into the subject. The study examined the direct relationship between religiosity, employee empowerment and employee engagement. Future research should explore how the effect of religiosity and employee empowerment on a relevant outcome changes according to other organisational characteristics.

Practical implications

Organisations must develop more interest in religion's relevance and its impact on their employees' engagement. This should be done by providing the necessary platforms for employees to practice their religion. There is the likelihood of lack of engagement when an organisation fails to consider employee religious orientation or attempts to unduly regulate employees' religiosity. Empowering work environment can promote a higher level of employee engagement. It is obvious that empowered employees are focussed, energetic, enthusiastic and have positive disposition to work. These positive attitudes lead to a higher level of engagement which fosters productivity and overall organisational performance.

Originality/value

This study could contribute to the literature on religiosity, employee empowerment and employee engagement in the Ghanaian context. Therefore, there is a need to keep employees engaged and enhance productivity. This study underpins the importance of religiosity and employee empowerment in fostering employee engagement and productivity in the Ghana work setting.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Nicholas Creel

The study aims to establish that religiosity has a positive link with government trust, making the secularization trend all the more likely to further erode this already…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to establish that religiosity has a positive link with government trust, making the secularization trend all the more likely to further erode this already fragile resource.

Design/methodology/approach

Through the use of data from the World Values Survey and European Social Survey the link between religiosity and trust in government is examined.

Findings

Religiosity and trust in government are positively linked in aggregate data.

Research limitations/implications

The analysis is based on aggregated data, not individual countries, and religiosity is a complex concept to measure.

Practical implications

Secularization will have a long-term negative effect on government trust. Low levels of trust in government in the West are likely here to stay, or even worsen, as populations continue to secularize.

Social implications

With less trust in government, it will be more difficult to govern effectively.

Originality/value

The author has not yet seen a full test on how secularization will impact trust in government. In fact, this study makes clear that the trend goes a long way explaining why trust in government has been falling in the developed world for decades.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 4 August 2021

Junaidi Junaidi

This research investigates how religiosity (e.g. extrinsic and intrinsic) influences consumers’ awareness and attitudes, which subsequently influences consumers…

Abstract

Purpose

This research investigates how religiosity (e.g. extrinsic and intrinsic) influences consumers’ awareness and attitudes, which subsequently influences consumers’ preferences for Muslims in the context of Islamic bank.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 480 Islamic bank consumers were recruited for online survey study. Structural equation modeling was used to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

Extrinsic religiosity has crucial role on consumers’ awareness and consumer attitudes. However, intrinsic religiosity has less effect on consumer attitudes, whereas consumer awareness plays an important role on consumer attitudes. Furthermore, mediator variables, such as consumers’ awareness and attitudes, have partial role to mediate religiosity and consumers’ preference.

Research limitations/implications

The recent study was limited to core of one region, therefore, future studies are needed to analyze consumers’ attitude and engagement in religious products and services such as Islamic brands image.

Practical implications

The stakeholders need to collaborate action to promote Islamic banks and the varying standard between their counterparts from the perspective of business and marketing.

Originality/value

The result of this study contributes to literature which has correlation with testing religion role toward Islamic bank. It also develops a new views into the determinants factor to influence consumers’ preferences.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2021

Majda Ayoub Juma Alzadjal, Mohd Fauzi Abu-Hussin, Maizaitulaidawati Md Husin and Mohd Yahya Mohd Hussin

The purpose of this paper is to explore the direct effect of classical predictors of an individual’s behaviour, namely, attitude, subjective norms (SN) and perceived…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the direct effect of classical predictors of an individual’s behaviour, namely, attitude, subjective norms (SN) and perceived behavioural control (PBC) on the intention to deal with Islamic banks. The study extended the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) by introducing the customers’ religiosity paradigm as a moderator between the classical predictors of the theory and the intention to deal with Islamic banks.

Design/methodology/approach

By applying the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) framework, data were collected from conventional banks to investigate the potential Islamic bank customers’ intention. Using self-administered questionnaires, the data were collected from conventional banks in Muscat. A total of 1,000 questionnaires were distributed; however, only 638 were found usable. The structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to test the hypothesis and analyse the prediction values of the model in the TPB framework. It is also used to analyse the moderation effect of religiosity on the relation between the predictors and intention.

Findings

The results of the SEM analysis indicated that attitude, SN and PBC significantly predicted the potential customers’ intention to deal with Islamic banks in Oman. The results of the moderation effect shown that religiosity was a poor moderator of the relation between the attitude and intention as well as the PBC and intention, though, the result shown that religiosity is a partial moderator of the relation between the SN and intention.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the current study method, the result findings should be generalised with caution. Future studies may introduce other variables to examine the moderation effect between the relation of the predictor and intention of the TPB framework. It also signifies the moderation effect of religiosity on the relationship between the attitude, SN and PBC and intention of the potential customs in the TPB framework. This is considered a theoretical enrichment to the behaviour studies and TPB literature.

Practical implications

The current study assists the Islamic bank practitioners and regulators to broaden the horizon in considering the practical outcomes from the academic research. The result from this study does not only prove that the TPB seems to be acceptable in explaining the intention and behaviour in the field of Islamic banking but also support the robustness of the ability of TPB in predicting the behaviour and intention in a different research context (Islamic banking and finance).

Originality/value

This study is an attempt to introduce religiosity as a moderator in the TPB framework with SEM analysis and to explore the moderation effect between the predictors and intention to deal with Islamic banks among Omani’s Islamic Bank Customers. This study endeavours to fill a gap of these moderation effects and how the customers’ religiosity influence customer’s preferences towards Islamic Bank.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2021

Mohd Adil

The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of religiosity on ethical consumption of consumers. It also aims to measure the mediating effect of materialism and guilt.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of religiosity on ethical consumption of consumers. It also aims to measure the mediating effect of materialism and guilt.

Design/methodology/approach

The study collected data from 360 Indian consumers through an online survey.

Findings

Religiosity was found to have a strong and significant influence on consumers’ ethical consumption behaviour. It was also found that materialism and guilt mediate the relationship between religiosity and ethical consumption. Findings reveal that a higher level of religiosity in consumers guides them to avoid unwanted behaviour such as unethical consumption.

Research limitations/implications

The study provides an insight into the significance of values in ethical consumption decisions. It examines the mediational effect of materialism and guilt between religiosity and ethical consumption.

Practical implications

Marketers can formulate more successful communication strategies by taking into account the level of religiosity of Indian consumers and underlying cultural foundations within the society. Marketers can also use taglines or promotional messages to promote sacrifice for the well-being of the environment.

Originality/value

This research is a guiding step towards studying the influence of religiosity on ethical consumption through guilt and materialism of consumers in an emerging nation.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2021

Hardius Usman, Chairy Chairy and Nucke Widowati Kusumo Projo

The purpose of this paper is to: build Muslim consumer decision-making style (MCDMS); analyze the influence of the consumer decision-making style on Muslim behavior to buy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to: build Muslim consumer decision-making style (MCDMS); analyze the influence of the consumer decision-making style on Muslim behavior to buy halal certified food; analyze the impact of religiosity on Muslim behavior in buying halal-certified food and study the role of religiosity in the relationship between MCDMS and Muslim behavior in buying halal certified food.

Design/methodology/approach

This study’s target population is the Muslim Indonesian population age at least 18 years old. The self-administered survey method is carried out based on convenience and snowball sampling techniques and the questionnaire is distributed online. This study collects data from 396 Muslim respondents in Indonesia through an online survey. Factor analysis and regression with interaction variables are applied to test the research hypothesis statistically.

Findings

This study reveals several results: MCDMS produces 10 dimensions; halal consciousness is an important dimension; the perfectionist/high-quality conscious and price-conscious, has a significant negative effect on the intention to buy halal-certified food; the halal consciousness and the recreational/hedonic conscious have a significant positive effect on the intention to buy halal certified food; religiosity has a significant positive impact directly on the intention to purchase halal-certified food; Religiosity positively moderates the impact of a perfectionist/high-quality conscious and price-conscious on the intention to buy halal-certified food.

Originality/value

This paper will build an MCDMS by adding the dimensions of halal consciousness. The author has not found literature about MCDMS. This research will also study the impact of MCDMS and religiosity on the intention to buy halal-certified food, as well as will study the role of religiosity in relationships between Muslim decision-making styles and intention to buy halal-certified food. Similar research is still very limited in marketing literature.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2021

Raed Khamis Alharbi, Sofri Bin Yahya and Salina Kassim

This study aims to examine the relationship between religiosity and branding on small- and medium-scale enterprises (SMEs’) performance in Saudi Arabia. It also examines…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationship between religiosity and branding on small- and medium-scale enterprises (SMEs’) performance in Saudi Arabia. It also examines the mediating role of financial literacy on the relationship among Islamic religiosity, branding and SMEs’ performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts the purposive sampling technique in three major commercial cities, namely, Riyadh, Jeddah and Al-Qassim to sample 100 SMEs each, resulting in a total sampling of 300 SMEs in Saudi Arabia. Structural equation modeling is used to analyze the hypotheses formulated in this study. The structural equation modeling is aided with the help of Smart-PLS software.

Findings

This study finds that Islamic branding (on customer, compliance and origin) significantly affect financial attitude, while Islamic religiosity affects financial awareness among the SMEs. Findings reveal that there is a mediating role of financial awareness on the relationship between Islamic branding and Islamic religiosity with the SMEs’ performance. No mediation effect was recorded for financial attitude and financial knowledge. Further investigation reveals that financial attitude, financial awareness, Islamic branding (compliance and origin) and Islamic religiosity were the most significant determinants of SMEs’ performance in the context of Saudi Arabia.

Research limitations/implications

This study is conducted on SMEs in Saudi Arabia only. Further studies are required to examine SMEs in other Islamic countries and regions to improve the explanatory power of financial literacy on Islamic religiosity and Islamic branding for improved SMEs performance.

Originality/value

This study establishes that Islamic religiosity and branding could further increase the predictive power of financial literacy on SMEs’ performance. This study concludes that efforts to improve financial literacy should be religion-based as well as culture-based depending on where the SMEs are located so that specific strategies can be implemented, to enable the conducive growth of the SMEs and maximize the contribution of the SMEs to economic growth.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000