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Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Ezlika Ghazali and Dilip S. Mutum

This chapter discusses whether marketing can ever be Islamic given the common view of marketing functions as unsustainable and sometimes unethical, for example, how…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter discusses whether marketing can ever be Islamic given the common view of marketing functions as unsustainable and sometimes unethical, for example, how marketing promotes materialism.

Methodology/approach

This chapter reviews extant literatures in Islamic marketing, with a particular emphasis on stakeholder orientation in marketing.

Findings

We argue that Islamic marketing is indeed compatible with the concepts of ethical and sustainable marketing encompassing social, environmental as well as economic perspectives and encourages ethical behaviour.

Originality/value

This chapter highlights that discussions on Islamic marketing should include sustainable marketing and emphasises the growing importance of stakeholder orientation in marketing.

Details

Advances in Islamic Finance, Marketing, and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-899-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 January 2007

Fikriyah Abdullah, Taufiq Hassan and Shamsher Mohamad

One of the implications of Islamic investment principles is the availability of Islamic financial instruments in the financial market. The main aim of this research is to…

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Abstract

Purpose

One of the implications of Islamic investment principles is the availability of Islamic financial instruments in the financial market. The main aim of this research is to observe the differences in terms of performance between Islamic and conventional mutual fund in the context of Malaysian capital market.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve the major objectives of this paper standard methods wereused for evaluating the mutual funds performance, for example, Sharpe index and adjusted Sharpe index, Jensen Alpha, Timing and selectivity ability. The scope of the paper is to measure the relative quantitative performance of funds which was managed based on two different approaches.

Findings

The basic finding of the paper is that Islamic funds performed better than the conventional funds during bearish economic trends while, conventional funds showed better performance than Islamic funds during bullish economic conditions. In addition to that finding, both conventional and Islamic funds were unable to achieve at least 50 per cent market diversification levels, though conventional funds are found to have a marginally better diversification level than the Islamic funds. The results also suggest that fund managers are unable to correctly identify good bargain stocks and to forecast the price movements of the general market.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation is that the samples of conventional and Islamic mutual funds were from one developing market. The findings could be better validated if the sample included the mutual funds from other developed and developing economies, where both Islamic and conventional funds are available.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that having Islamic mutual funds in an investment portfolio helps to hedge the downside risk in an adverse economic situation.

Originality/value

So far there is no published evidence on the relative performance of Islamic and conventional mutual funds in Malaysia as well as other developing countries. Therefore, this paper adds new knowledge to the mutual funds literature.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 20 May 2019

Salman Ahmed Shaikh, Abdul Ghafar Ismail and Mohd Adib Ismail

Muslim investors must comply with the ethical injunctions prescribed for them while making financial investments. As per Islamic principles, the use of Riba (interest)…

Abstract

Muslim investors must comply with the ethical injunctions prescribed for them while making financial investments. As per Islamic principles, the use of Riba (interest), Maysir (gambling) and Gharar (uncertain or contingent payoff contracts) is prohibited. This chapter provides some recent post great financial crisis evidence on the comparative performance of Islamic and conventional market indices. Islamic indices outperformed conventional market indices in terms of annualized returns except for emerging markets. In the overall period of 2007-16, it is found that Islamic indices have a lower coefficient of variation and hence higher reward to variability ratio. This suggests that Islamic indices are superior to conventional market indices adjusting for variability in returns. In most comparable Islamic and conventional indices, a strong co-movement and long-term co-integrating relationship is found. The results also highlighted causality running from conventional indices to the Islamic indices in most of the market groups, except for the S&P Global.

Details

Research in Corporate and Shari’ah Governance in the Muslim World: Theory and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-007-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 March 2013

Yusniza Kamarulzaman and Azian Madun

The rapid growth of Islamic banking in Malaysia warrants banking institutions being more proactive and innovative in marketing their products. The purpose of this paper is…

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Abstract

Purpose

The rapid growth of Islamic banking in Malaysia warrants banking institutions being more proactive and innovative in marketing their products. The purpose of this paper is to re‐evaluate the progress and achievements of Islamic banking in Malaysia, particularly in the area of sales and marketing of Islamic banking services.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts a comprehensive literature review from various published sources. All related references were discovered through electronic databases, journals and books in the area of the relevant literature in Islamic finance, banking and services marketing.

Findings

The driving force for the growth of Islamic banking and financing products is the corporate clients, and not the Muslim individuals. In fact, the non‐Muslim individuals also use Islamic banking if they find that the service is good and meets their expectations. This paper shows evidence that the marketing activities of Islamic banking products is relatively ineffective compared to the conventional banking products in Malaysia. This paper also discusses the reasons for the ineffectiveness of marketing Islamic banking products at the micro and macro‐level. Depending on religion alone is not the best strategy to attract customers.

Practical implications

The products offered by the Islamic banking system have to compete with those of the conventional banking system. Hence, a continuous review of marketing strategies for Islamic banking products is crucial in every Islamic financial institution.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils a need to study whether the common methods in marketing conventional banking products would be effective in the context of marketing Islamic banking products.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 14 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 29 December 2016

Mahfod Aldoseri and Andrew C. Worthington

The purpose of this chapter is to review the risks Islamic financial institutions face in an emerging market context, including risk sharing in Islamic financing and…

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to review the risks Islamic financial institutions face in an emerging market context, including risk sharing in Islamic financing and Shari’ah (Islamic law) compliance risk. We explore current risk management practices and establish the link between risk management and the financial performance of banks and the efficiency and effectiveness of financial sectors in emerging markets. Because of their distinctive risk profile, Islamic finance institutions face challenges in risk management. We show that Islamic banking is riskier in emerging markets because of the presence of immature money markets, limitations in the availability of lender of last resort facilities, and deficiencies in market infrastructure. There is also no evidence that Islamic banks have developed effective solutions for managing the risks conventional banks face as well as their own unique risks. We suggest that the countries that do this best are those that prioritize the structure of risk management knowledge and capabilities in a single financial regulator.

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 16 June 2022

Fatma Mathlouthi and Slah Bahloul

This paper aims at examining the co-movement dependent regime and causality relationships between conventional and Islamic returns for emerging, frontier and developed…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims at examining the co-movement dependent regime and causality relationships between conventional and Islamic returns for emerging, frontier and developed markets from November 2008 to August 2020.

Design/methodology/approach

First, the authors used the Markov-switching autoregression (MS–AR) model to capture the regime-switching behavior in the stock market returns. Second, the authors applied the Markov-switching regression and vector autoregression (MS-VAR) models in order to study, respectively, the co-movement and causality relationship between returns of conventional and Islamic indexes across market states.

Findings

Results show the presence of two different regimes for the three studied markets, namely, stability and crisis periods. Also, the authors found evidence of a co-movement relationship between the conventional and Islamic indexes for the three studied markets whatever the regime. For the Granger causality, it is proved only for emerging and developed markets and only during the stability regime. Finally, the authors conclude that Islamic indexes can act as diversifiers, or safe-haven assets are not strongly supported.

Originality/value

This paper is the first study that examines the co-movement and the causal relationship between conventional and Islamic indexes not only across different financial markets' regimes but also during the COVID-19 period. The findings may help investors in making educated decisions about whether or not to add Islamic indexes to their portfolios especially during the recent outbreak.

Details

Journal of Capital Markets Studies, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-4774

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 April 2022

Waqar Haider Hashmi, Nazima Ellahi, Saima Ehsan and Ajmal Waheed

The purpose of this study is to highlight key issues pertaining to making use of Islamic equity indices and proposing possible solutions to address the problems faced in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to highlight key issues pertaining to making use of Islamic equity indices and proposing possible solutions to address the problems faced in advancement of the concept of Shariah investing (SI) with the aim to advance the discourse on the subject.

Design/methodology/approach

Online focus group discussion (FGD) was carried out in which ten Islamic finance researchers and analysts belonging to institutions considered as authority on the subject matter participated to share their viewpoints on Islamic equity indices. Content analysis on the collected data of FGD was carried out which has revealed six key themes.

Findings

Six broader themes were identified based on the analysis of FGD, which includes criteria for constructing Islamic equity indices, utilization of Islamic equity indices for comparison with conventional stock indices, stock market efficiency perspectives, reason for integration of different equity markets, investors’ awareness of SI and future directions of Islamic equity indices. Results of the study indicate that Islamic finance researchers and analysts opined that there is a need for revising the criteria for construction of Islamic equity indices. There are conflicting viewpoints regarding performance and efficiency of Islamic indices in comparison with conventional indices and main reasons for stock market integration are trade liberalization, globalization and other factors. Moreover, there is a need for making investors and other market players aware about the attractiveness of Islamic indices from investing point of view.

Originality/value

Based on this extensive literature review and as highlighted by Masih et al. (2018) in their recap of literature on Islamic equity indices indicating that there are bulk of empirical studies carried in the past in the domain, however, there is a dearth of theoretical and qualitative studies. Hence, this preliminary qualitative study not only makes theoretical contribution but also deploys FGD, which is rarely used in the similar context, and offers candid views of the participants on key issues pertaining to Islamic equity indices. This lends novelty to this study.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 February 2022

Sitara Karim and Muhammad Abubakr Naeem

This study aims to examine the connectedness among green, Islamic and conventional financial markets from December 2008 to May 2021. Moreover, the impact of global factors…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the connectedness among green, Islamic and conventional financial markets from December 2008 to May 2021. Moreover, the impact of global factors on the connectedness of given financial markets is also observed.

Design/methodology/approach

This study first employed the time-varying parameter vector autoregressions (TVP-VAR) technique to explore the connectedness of markets. Second, This study utilized the wavelet coherence analysis to test the time-frequency impact of global factors in terms of implied volatilities of stock, oil, gold, currency and bond on the connectedness across financial markets.

Findings

This study finds Islamic stocks, sustainability index and S&P500 composite index are the net transmitters, whereas Sukuk, commodity index, bond market, clean energy and green bonds are the net recipient of spillovers. Time-varying features of green, Islamic and conventional financial markets are evident in system-wide connectedness. This study further evidenced that global factors drive the connectedness of financial markets, particularly during stressful times.

Practical implications

The findings of this study furnish significant implications for policymakers, regulatory authorities, investors, financial market participants and portfolio managers in terms of carefully assessing the unique characteristics offered by each financial market in terms of risk mitigation and diversifying the portfolios.

Originality/value

Using a portfolio of green, Islamic and conventional financial markets, the uniqueness of this study lies in the examination of the connectedness of these markets by deploying the TVP-VAR technique. In addition, wavelet analysis offers a significant contribution in terms of global factors driving the connectedness of green, Islamic and conventional markets.

Details

International Journal of Managerial Finance, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1743-9132

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 28 December 2021

Joseph Falzon and Elaine Bonnici

This paper empirically investigates the performance of Islamic funds, which have been praised for weathering the 2008 financial storm relatively well and compares it to a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper empirically investigates the performance of Islamic funds, which have been praised for weathering the 2008 financial storm relatively well and compares it to a European product designed to protect the most vulnerable of investors, UCITS funds.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper builds on 128 time-series regressions using various factor models to analyse the risk-return relationship of 242 Islamic and UCITS funds relative to a market benchmark, over a 10-year period starting January 2006, to capture severe bear and bull market conditions.

Findings

Islamic funds do not face a competitive disadvantage arising from their strict compliance with Sharīʿah principles, and their performance and investment style is relatively similar to UCITS schemes.

Practical implications

Islamic funds represent a low risk investment due to their very mild betas. Therefore, when forming part of a diversified portfolio, they can act as a hedging tool against adverse market movements.

Social implications

Muslim investors are not punished relative to conventional retail investors when following their own beliefs. Other investors can consider Islamic funds in their portfolio allocation, especially those who seek socially and ethically responsible investments.

Originality/value

This paper fills a lacuna in the existing literature, because the sample is made up of Islamic funds established worldwide and includes not only equity, but also fixed income and mixed allocation funds.

Article
Publication date: 23 February 2022

Fatma Houidi and Siwar Ellouze

The purpose of this paper is to examine the dependence structure between the US conventional stock market and each Islamic and conventional stock market provided by the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the dependence structure between the US conventional stock market and each Islamic and conventional stock market provided by the Dow Jones index, namely, for the UK, Canada, Europe, the emerging countries and Asia-Pacific. This paper considers both the bearish and bullish market phases of the 2008 global financial crisis to analyze the financial contagion.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors implement the copula framework-based GJR-GARCH-t model for the period from December 31, 2004 to September 30, 2016.

Findings

The marginal models suggest a strong persistence of volatility in all stock markets. The dependence structure for stock market pairs under-consideration is not all strictly symmetrical. Moreover, the Islamic stock markets witness the same behavior as their conventional counterparts. Finally, the resilience and the decoupling hypotheses are not all around upheld by the empirical proof.

Originality/value

The findings of this paper are very important for global investors in their risk management during extreme market events. As the Sukuk is considered as a safe haven during crisis episodes, the investors are invited to take it into account for further portfolio diversification.

Details

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8394

Keywords

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