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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2020

Siti Hasnah Hassan, Norizan Mat Saad, Tajul Ariffin Masron and Siti Insyirah Ali

Buy Muslim’s First campaign started with the primary aim of urging the Muslim community to be more vigilant about halal or Shariah-compliant products, leading to a number…

Abstract

Purpose

Buy Muslim’s First campaign started with the primary aim of urging the Muslim community to be more vigilant about halal or Shariah-compliant products, leading to a number of halal-related issues, triggered by the exploitation or misuse of the halal logo in Malaysia. The purpose of this study is to gain an understanding of the purchase intention for Muslim-made products by applying the theory of planned behaviour (TPB). Halal consciousness was integrated as a moderating influence on the purchase intention of Muslim-made products.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection was performed through a self-administered questionnaire which was distributed through convenience sampling method. Therefore, a useful sample comprising 152 Malay Muslim participants aged over 18 was collected. For hypothesis testing, hierarchical multiple regression analysis was implemented.

Findings

It was found that the participants’ attitudes towards the purchase of Muslim-made products and their perceived behavioural control significantly influenced their purchase intention, but the subjective norm did not impact this intention. Furthermore, halal consciousness moderated the relationships among all the independent and dependent variables. Halal consciousness moderated the relationship between participants’ attitudes towards Muslim-made products and their perceived behavioural control towards the purchase intention; however, this moderation did not occur through the subjective norm and the purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

As the findings of this study were limited to the Muslim population in Malaysia, it might be difficult to generalize for other nations that have no similarities with the Malaysian Muslim culture.

Practical implications

The findings of this study may support Muslims to implement more effective marketing strategies that attract the target customers to purchase Muslim-made products. Effective promotion may attract potential customers as well.

Originality/value

The halal consciousness among Muslim consumers is important for the moderation and prediction of consumers’ intention to purchase Muslim-made products.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Nurdin Sobari, Andyan Kurniati and Hardius Usman

This study aims to analyze the behavior of Indonesian Muslim consumers toward halal wellness services, especially to determine the effect of Islamic attributes providing…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyze the behavior of Indonesian Muslim consumers toward halal wellness services, especially to determine the effect of Islamic attributes providing halal wellness services and customer religious commitment as a moderating variable on customer satisfaction and loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was carried out by surveying 260 respondents from 13 Muslim salon outlets in the Jabodetabek area as research samples. Furthermore, a quantitative approach with moderated regression analysis is used as an analytical tool to test the research hypothesis.

Findings

The study found that embedding Islamic attributes in a halal service correlated positively with customer satisfaction. Four of the six dimensions of Islamic attributes that provide halal wellness services have a significant influence on customer satisfaction and loyalty. In addition, it was found that the moderating effect of religious commitment variables was only significant on two Islamic attributes, namely, Muslim goods and services and halal labeled products.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted with samples taken from only one brand of muslimah salon in Jabodetabek area. So that generalization needs to be done with caution.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for the marketing strategy of halal wellness services industry including the importance of experiential marketing strategy, the moderation between fiqh law compliance and customer convenience and the service customization based on customer preferences.

Originality/value

This paper gives an understanding of the behavior of halal wellness service users on how halal service attributes affect user satisfaction and loyalty.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Dessy Kurnia Sari, Dick Mizerski and Fang Liu

This paper aims to investigate the motivations behind Muslim consumers’ boycotting of foreign products. The act of boycotting foreign products has become increasingly…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the motivations behind Muslim consumers’ boycotting of foreign products. The act of boycotting foreign products has become increasingly common among Muslim consumers. Products from different countries-of-origin are their boycott targets.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted semi-structured in-depth interviews and focus-group discussions for data collection. A total of 36 Indonesian subjects participated in the study, representing the “university student” and “non-university student” samples. Leximancer, a qualitative analytical tool, was used to identify important motivations for boycotting behaviour among Muslim consumers.

Findings

Contrary to previous findings, this study found that Muslim consumers do not boycott solely for religious reasons. For example, most participants reported they boycotted Chinese products because they would like to protect their local products, along with the religious-based motivation of rejecting uncertainty about the halal certification of the products. Thus, the motivations identified from this study were not related exclusively to religion.

Practical implications

The present study offers new insights into the religious and secular motivations of Muslim consumers’ boycotts. Foreign products should adopt localised strategies such as repeatedly reminding consumers of the true halal nature of their products and their contribution to the local people.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the recognition of new insights into Muslim motivation to boycott product. The results develop important concepts surrounding the issue of boycotting foreign products. A concept map has been produced to offer a more comprehensive picture of Muslim’s boycotting behaviour.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Mohammad Ashraful Ferdous Chowdhury, Mohammad Shoyeb, Chowdhury Akbar and Md. Nazrul Islam

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of risk sharing and non-risk sharing instruments on both the profitability of Islamic banks and the economic growth of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of risk sharing and non-risk sharing instruments on both the profitability of Islamic banks and the economic growth of the country. This study also aims to improve the profit and loss sharing-based asset growth of Islamic banks.

Methodology/approach

The data for this study are obtained from the annual reports of all Islamic banks from Bangladesh using Bank scope database and annual report for the period of 1983–2014. The research uses Autoregressive Distributive Lag approach.

Findings

The findings reveal that risk sharing instruments are positively related to profitability and the economic growth of the country. This study also finds that non-risk sharing instruments play a predominant role in the profitability of the Islamic bank but are negatively related to the economic growth of the country.

Research implications

Banks and other financial institutions need to pay greater attention to systemic risk created by risk transfer and apply risk sharing methods of financing more vigorously than has hitherto been the case.

Originality/value

This study will also contribute to the literature as relatively few Islamic financial literatures deal with the relationship between equity financing and profitability which may make a strong contribution to the area of Islamic finance.

Details

Advances in Islamic Finance, Marketing, and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-899-8

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2019

Daniel Hummel and Ayesha Tahir Hashmi

The purpose of this paper is to explore the application of a profit and loss sharing approach to tax increment financing (TIF) districts in the USA.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the application of a profit and loss sharing approach to tax increment financing (TIF) districts in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey based on this approach was distributed to representatives of community redevelopment authorities (CRAs) in the State of Florida to ascertain practitioner feedback.

Findings

Although a majority of the respondents did not feel it was possible for political, economic and legal reasons, some did feel that it was a practical, reasonable and sustainable approach to financing projects for economic development. Some responses were correlated, with others indicating that certain beliefs framed their answers to the questions.

Research limitations/implications

The surveys were only distributed to CRAs in the State of Florida. Future research will need to include other CRAs in other states to make the findings more generalizable. In addition, the results are merely descriptive and are not an assessment of a successful application.

Practical implications

The need for more development in blighted areas of many cities across the USA will put emphasis on innovative approaches in financing this. The growth of Islamic finance in the USA and the regulatory framework for it might open a doorway for its application in this area.

Originality/value

This is the first attempt to apply an Islamic financing methodology to local economic development in the USA, with practitioner feedback.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Mohammed Sharif

International conflicts and violence are similar in nature to domestic conflicts and violence which are also similar to those taking place between individuals. Only…

Abstract

International conflicts and violence are similar in nature to domestic conflicts and violence which are also similar to those taking place between individuals. Only difference between them is that of magnitude that increases as one moves from individual to societal national level and finally to international level of conflicts. The fundamental question at issue here is that of self‐interest with respect to social and political authority and economic power. The conflicts become most intense and violence gets widest and most cruel at the international level. There are two broad methods in dealing with this problem – use of force to coerce and subjugate or application of the power of persuasion to win the hearts and minds of the people. The former is the conventional secular materialistic method but often used invoking the name of religion and the latter is that of true spiritual humanistic practices and applications in preserving and promoting the cause of all of humanity.While the first does not require the system to be fair and just, the latter predicates them. The foundation of the first is “us” vs. “them” as it divides humanity into many nation states, but that of the second is “us” vs. “us” since it recognizes and practices universality of humanity. More importantly, the former grants unfettered authority to the leaders of the society in the form of sovereignty of the “nation state”, the latter subjugates the authority of the leaders to that of a higher supreme Authority.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 24 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1997

Kevin B. Bucknall

Looks briefly at where China has done better than the Russian Federation in the process of transition from a centrally planned to a market economy. Examines various…

Abstract

Looks briefly at where China has done better than the Russian Federation in the process of transition from a centrally planned to a market economy. Examines various possible reasons for the different degree of success, drawn from such disciplines as economics, political science, international relations and history, as well the administration and processes adopted, and the cultures involved. Finally, considers a cross‐discipline explanation. Concludes that it is neither possible nor desirable to seek a single explanation for such a complex question. Draws some tentative conclusions about what we can learn from the experiences of both.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 24 no. 7/8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 June 2021

Andi Syathir Sofyan, Abror Abror, Trisno Wardy Putra, Muslihati Muslihati, Syaakir Sofyan, Sirajuddin Sirajuddin, Muhammad Nasri Katman and Andi Zulfikar Darussalam

This paper aims to provide a primary contribution to the halal tourism industry by presenting a crisis and disaster management framework based on Islamic teachings.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a primary contribution to the halal tourism industry by presenting a crisis and disaster management framework based on Islamic teachings.

Design/methodology/approach

To develop the framework, a systematic review was conducted using the grounded theory step as an analytical framework through tracing papers from 2000 to 2020. The first step was to carry out an open coding by collecting extracted concepts and categories. Furthermore, axial coding was carried out to connect among the categories. Selective coding was conducted to all identified categories, and they were then integrated to develop a framework. The results obtained are three selected coding, eight axial coding and 55 open coding.

Findings

The result indicates that Islam teaches much principles, behavioral responses and psychological responses to crises and disasters. However, it is not neatly arranged in a modern crisis and disaster management concept. In addition, the advantage for halal tourism is that Muslims make Islamic teachings the foundation of social and community resilience in the face of disasters.

Research limitations/implications

The research findings also provide the knowledge to the tourism planners and academicians in overcoming the crises and disasters.

Originality/value

This paper provides a crisis and disaster management framework with additional decision-making concepts using a maqasid matrix.

清真旅游的危机和灾难管理:系统评价

目的

本研究旨在通过提出基于伊斯兰教义的危机和灾难管理框架, 为清真旅游业做出主要贡献。

设计/方法/方法

为开发该框架, 使用了扎根的理论步骤作为分析框架, 通过跟踪2000年至2020年的论文进行了系统的审查。第一步是通过收集提取的概念和类别进行公开编码。此外, 还进行了轴向编码以连接类别之间。对所有已识别的类别进行了选择性编码, 然后将它们集成以开发框架。获得的结果是3种选择的编码, 8种轴向编码和55种开放编码

调查结果

结果表明, 伊斯兰教给危机和灾难带来了很多原理, 行为对策和心理对策。但是, 在现代危机和灾难管理概念中并没有整齐地安排它。此外, 清真旅游的优势在于, 穆斯林在面对灾难时使伊斯兰教义成为社会和社区复原力的基础。

独创性/价值

本文提供了一个危机与灾难管理框架, 并使用了混乱矩阵来制定其他决策概念。

研究意义

研究成果还为旅游业计划者和院士提供了克服危机和灾难的知识。

Gestión de crisis y desastres para el turismo hala: una revisión sistemática

Propósito

esta investigación tuvo como objetivo proporcionar una contribución principal a la industria del turismo halal al presentar un marco de gestión de crisis y desastres basado en las enseñanzas islámicas.

Diseño/metodología/enfoque

para desarrollar el marco, se realizó una revisión sistemática utilizando el paso de la teoría fundamentada como marco analítico a través de artículos de seguimiento de 2000 a 2020. El primer paso fue realizar una codificación abierta mediante la recopilación de conceptos y categorías extraídos. Además, se llevó a cabo una codificación axial para conectar entre las categorías. Se realizó una codificación selectiva para todas las categorías identificadas y luego se integraron para desarrollar un marco. Los resultados obtenidos son 3 codificaciones seleccionadas, 8 codificaciones axiales y 55 codificaciones abiertas

Hallazgos

el resultado indica que el Islam enseña muchos principios, respuestas de comportamiento y respuestas psicológicas a crisis y desastres. Sin embargo, no está ordenado en un concepto moderno de gestión de crisis y desastres. Además, la ventaja del turismo halal es que los musulmanes hacen de las enseñanzas islámicas la base de la resiliencia social y comunitaria frente a los desastres.

Originalidad/valor

este documento proporciona un marco de gestión de crisis y desastres con conceptos adicionales para la toma de decisiones utilizando una matriz maqasid.

Implicaciones de la investigación

los resultados de la investigación también proporcionan el conocimiento a los planificadores turísticos y académicos para superar las crisis y los desastres.

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2019

Zulfiqar Ali Jumani and Sasiwemon Sukhabot

The demand for halal products is growing and attracting the attention of producers. In recent years, the importance of halal logo and popularity of halal products has…

Abstract

Purpose

The demand for halal products is growing and attracting the attention of producers. In recent years, the importance of halal logo and popularity of halal products has increased. The purpose of this paper was to identify the behavioral intentions among people of different religion in respect of purchasing products bearing halal logo (halal logo products) at convenience stores in Hatyai. 7-Eleven store chain was targeted to collect data in this research because it serves people of different religions.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual model adopted for this research work was the theory of reasoned action (TRA). The response of consumers was collected through a structured survey, using the convenience sampling technique. A total of 215 respondents submitted their responses, consisting of 92.8 per cent local respondents and 8.2 per cent international respondents. The purposive sample technique was used to select the locations for collecting data, who was purchasing items from 7-Eleven stores and lives in Hatyai.

Findings

The findings indicate that Muslims strictly follow the halal logo and their attitude is positive in selecting halal logo products. The influence of their subjective norms is stronger because of their families and culture, as they are Muslim which influence their intentions. For non-Muslims, there is no obligation requiring them to select halal logo products, but even so, around 80 per cent of non-Muslims showed a positive attitude toward the halal logo, 54 per cent showed were interest and indicated that they may select products with halal logo in future.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted in Hatyai and the results were based on three independent variables, namely, attitude, subjective norms and intention, with religion as the demographic variable. The findings offer an insight into the importance of the halal logo for different religions at convenience stores in Hatyai.

Practical implications

This study is initially beneficial for 7-Eleven stores, other convenience stores, businesses and halal institutes. It offers an insight into the importance of the halal logo and the motives of consumers in choosing halal logo products.

Originality/value

This paper seeks to explicate consumers’ intentions to buy halal logo products in convenience stores.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2020

Syed Faheem Hasan Bukhari, Frances M. Woodside, Rumman Hassan, Omar Massoud Salim Hassan Ali, Saima Hussain and Rabail Waqas

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the key attributes that drive Muslim consumer purchase behavior in the context of imported Western food in Pakistan.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the key attributes that drive Muslim consumer purchase behavior in the context of imported Western food in Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth, semi-structured interviews were used as a data collection tool. In this research, the in-depth interview data were analysed by using the manual content analysis (MCA) technique. Moreover, Leximancer software was used to reanalyse the data to enhance the trustworthiness of the MCA results. A total sample of 43 Muslim consumers from three metropolitan cities in Pakistan participated in the research. The sample comprises professionals, housewives and both college and university students.

Findings

Muslim consumers in Pakistan look at both the intrinsic and extrinsic attributes when purchasing imported Western food. The ruling factors explored were product taste, ingredients, freshness, hygiene, brand name and overall product quality. However, product packaging and labeling also play a significant role. Participants were of the view that imported Western food provides a better, unique consumption experience and an opportunity to choose from a wide variety of food options. Interestingly, interview findings reveal that Western food product attributes surpass the Islamic concept of moderate spending, thus convincing Muslim consumers to engage in the consumption of imported Western food.

Social implications

The presence of imported Western food may improve quality of life by having more opportunities and healthier options for the nation. If the Western food products are stamped Halal or made with Halal ingredients the product has a fair chance of adoption and penetration in the society. Further, it may result in overall health improvements within the society, which is already a major concern in the Pakistani consumer market. Also, food products coming from the Western world induces mindfulness; people are more aware about innovative and useful ingredients that can satisfy their taste buds.

Originality/value

This paper found that Pakistani Muslim consumers are not really concerned about the Islamic concept of moderate spending, and thus, established that Pakistani Muslim consumers are more concerned about product value rather than their Islamic teaching of moderate spending. From a population, with 97 per cent Muslim majority, product packaging and labeling were found to be a dominant and deciding factor, which, in itself, is an interesting finding. Further, established Western brand names help Muslim consumers to recognize products and plays a vital role in their purchase decisions. However, within product labeling, the element of halal ingredients was found to be a deciding factor, but not a leading factor, in purchase decisions.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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