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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2022

Neha Chhabra Roy and Sreeleakha Prabhakaran

The study aims to overview the different types of internal-led cyber fraud that have gained mainstream attention in recent major-value fraud events involving prominent…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to overview the different types of internal-led cyber fraud that have gained mainstream attention in recent major-value fraud events involving prominent Indian banks. The authors attempted to identify and classify cyber frauds and its drivers and correlate them for optimal mitigation planning.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology opted for the identification and classification is through a detailed literature review and focus group discussion with risk and vigilance officers and cyber cell experts. The authors assessed the future of cyber fraud in the Indian banking business through the machine learning–based k-nearest neighbor (K-NN) approach and prioritized and predicted the future of cyber fraud. The predicted future revealing dominance of a few specific cyber frauds will help to get an appropriate fraud prevention model, using an associated parties centric (victim and offender) root-cause approach. The study uses correlation analysis and maps frauds with their respective drivers to determine the resource specific effective mitigation plan.

Findings

Finally, the paper concludes with a conceptual framework for preventing internal-led cyber fraud within the scope of the study. A cyber fraud mitigation ecosystem will be helpful for policymakers and fraud investigation officers to create a more robust environment for banks through timely and quick detection of cyber frauds and prevention of them.

Research limitations/implications

Additionally, the study supports the Reserve Bank of India and the Government of India's launched cyber security initiates and schemes which ensure protection for the banking ecosystem i.e. RBI direct scheme, integrated ombudsman scheme, cyber swachhta kendra (botnet cleaning and malware analysis centre), National Cyber Coordination Centre (NCCC) and Security Monitoring Centre (SMC).

Practical implications

Structured and effective internal-led plans for cyber fraud mitigation proposed in this study will conserve banks, employees, regulatory authorities, customers and economic resources, save bank authorities’ and policymakers’ time and money, and conserve resources. Additionally, this will enhance the reputation of the Indian banking industry and extend its lifespan.

Originality/value

The innovative insider-led cyber fraud mitigation approach quickly identifies cyber fraud, prioritizes it, identifies its prominent root causes, map frauds with respective root causes and then suggests strategies to ensure a cost-effective and time-saving bank ecosystem.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2022

Ioanna Falagara Sigala, Mikhail Sirenko, Tina Comes and Gyöngyi Kovács

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has emerged as an unprecedented health crisis worldwide and heavily disrupted the healthcare supply chain. This study focuses…

Abstract

Purpose

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has emerged as an unprecedented health crisis worldwide and heavily disrupted the healthcare supply chain. This study focuses on analysing the different types of disruptions occurring in personal protective equipment (PPE) supply chains during the COVID-19 pandemic and on proposing mitigation strategies that are fit to the global scale and many interdependencies that are characteristic for this pandemic. The authors construct a conceptual system dynamics model (SD) based on the literature and adjusted with the use of empirical data (interviews) to capture the complexity of a global supply chain and identify leverage points (mitigation strategies).

Design/methodology/approach

This research follows a mix-methods approach. First, the authors developed a conceptual framework based on four types of disruptions that usually occur during health emergencies (direct effect, policy, supply chain strategy, and behaviourally induced disruptions). Second, the authors collected and analysed data from interviews with experts in the PPE supply chain. Based on the interviews data, the authors developed a conceptual system dynamics (SD) model that allows to capture the complex and dynamic interplay between the elements of the global supply chain system, by highlighting key feedback loops, delays, and the way the mitigation strategies can impact on them. From this analysis, the authors developed four propositions for supply chain risk management (SCRM) in global health emergencies and four recommendations for the policy and decision makers.

Findings

The SD model highlights that without a combination of mitigation measures, it is impossible to overcome all disruptions. As such, a co-ordinated effort across the different countries and sectors that experience the disruptions is needed. The SD model also shows that there are important feedback loops, by which initial disruptions create delays and shortages that propagate through the supply chain network. If the co-ordinated mitigation measures are not implemented early at the onset of the pandemic, these disruptions will be persistent, creating potential shortages of PPE and other critical equipment at the onset of a pandemic – when they are most urgently needed.

Originality/value

This research enriches the understanding of the disruptions of PPE supply chains on the systems level and proposes mitigation strategies based on empirical data and the existing literature.

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2022

Ernest Yaw Tweneboah-Koduah, Matilda Adams, Michael Nana Amoakoh and Stephen Mahamah Braimah

The purpose of this study is to deepen the understanding of individuals’ flood disaster mitigation behaviour through the theoretical lens of self-determination theory…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to deepen the understanding of individuals’ flood disaster mitigation behaviour through the theoretical lens of self-determination theory (SDT). Specifically, the paper examines the influence of autonomy, competence and relatedness on individuals’ self-determined motivation for flood disaster mitigation. The study also examines whether self-determined motivation influences individuals’ flood disaster mitigation behaviour adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a cross-sectional survey design, the study used a quantitative research approach for data collection and analyses. Specifically, data was analysed using the structural equation modelling technique.

Findings

The result of this study revealed that competence was the strongest predictor of self-determined motivation, followed by autonomy. The result further shows that self-determined motivation positively influences individual’s adoption of flood mitigation behaviour. However, the results showed that relatedness does not predict self-determined motivation for flood disaster mitigation.

Practical implications

To enhance the effectiveness of flood disaster mitigation social marketing campaigns, the SDT psychological needs constructs (particularly, competence and autonomy) can aid in assessing the motivation of the target population towards adopting mitigation behaviours. An assessment of motivation will help understand perception of flood risk and behavioural evaluation. The consideration of autonomy and competence on motivation will aid in developing effective campaigns to satisfy the needs of the target population.

Originality/value

The paper adds to the limited research that used SDT to understand a social marketing phenomenon.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 January 2022

Oluponmile Olonilua

This chapter discusses some issues of diversity in hazard mitigation when just recovery is considered or not. Justice in hazard mitigation becomes crucial considering…

Abstract

This chapter discusses some issues of diversity in hazard mitigation when just recovery is considered or not. Justice in hazard mitigation becomes crucial considering unequal distribution of resources, systemic racism, and social vulnerability to hazards. While there has been research on just recovery, there is little or no evidence of research that examines the issue of equity and justice in hazard mitigation, This chapter discusses what hazard mitigation is, the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 focusing on the planning process, public involvement in the planning process, some planning theories on vulnerability, and building the case for achieving and striving for justice and equity in promoting diversity in hazard mitigation. The chapter makes some recommendation on how to achieve diversity in hazard mitigation.

Details

Justice, Equity, and Emergency Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-332-9

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2014

Rajarshi DasGupta and Rajib Shaw

Arsenic contamination in shallow groundwater aquifers in the lower Gangetic basin constitutes a major health hazard in the Bengal basin extended over Bangladesh and India…

Abstract

Arsenic contamination in shallow groundwater aquifers in the lower Gangetic basin constitutes a major health hazard in the Bengal basin extended over Bangladesh and India. It has been estimated that at least 35 million people in Bangladesh and 6 million people in India are severely affected by arsenic-contaminated water. More so, about 57 and 9 million people in Bangladesh and West Bengal, respectively, are exposed to arsenic-contamination risk. The use of hazardous, arsenic-bearing groundwater for drinking, cooking, and irrigation in West Bengal and Bangladesh has led to what has been described by the WHO as the worst case of mass poisoning in human history. In case of West Bengal, the problem of arsenic contamination was discovered in the 1980s; since then several mitigation measures were adopted by the provincial and federal governments, community organizations, and NGOs. Yet, poor infrastructural arrangements, dire poverty, lack of awareness, and education increased the risk of arsenic exposure over the decades. In this chapter, an effort has been made to critically analyze the extent of mitigation measures adopted so far in the state of West Bengal. It discusses in detail the chronological responses of the provincial government in arsenic risk mitigation, implementation of adopted mitigation measures, and the consequent response and actions of arsenic-affected communities in West Bengal. The chapter also highlights the emerging challenges of arsenic risk mitigation in West Bengal and proposes a “system-based” framework for risk mitigation.

Details

Water Insecurity: A Social Dilemma
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-882-2

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 July 2014

Rebecca Lave

Market-based approaches to environmental management are increasingly common. In 1983 when Joeres and David published their pioneering collection, Buying a Better

Abstract

Market-based approaches to environmental management are increasingly common. In 1983 when Joeres and David published their pioneering collection, Buying a Better Environment, the concept was seen as at best novel, and at worst far-fetched. Yet today, conservation and water quality credits are for sale in many developed countries, and the idea of payment for ecosystem services is ubiquitous in environmental policy circles. This paper traces that shift from command-and-control to market-based environmental management through analysis of the evolving practice of stream mitigation banking (SMB) in the US. In the most common form of SMB today, a for-profit company buys land with a damaged stream on it and restores it to produce mitigation credits which can then be purchased by developers to fulfill their permit conditions under the Clean Water Act. Though decidedly noncommercial in origin, SMB was converted into for-profit tradable regulatory mechanism in 2000 and has since spread rapidly across the US with the strong support of the US Environmental Protection Agency. Using Bourdieu’s field concept as a framework, I argue that the neoliberal transformation of mitigation banking is a product of both relations within the regulatory field, of that field’s relations with the fields of science, and of power.

Details

Fields of Knowledge: Science, Politics and Publics in the Neoliberal Age
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-668-2

Article
Publication date: 19 May 2022

Sufian Qrunfleh, Shiri Vivek, Russ Merz and Deepak Mathivathanan

The purpose of this paper is to understand the themes and direction of supply chain mitigation and resilience research during the COVID-19 pandemic by conducting a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the themes and direction of supply chain mitigation and resilience research during the COVID-19 pandemic by conducting a systematic literature review (SLR) of supply chain mitigation literature since pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses the Web of Science (WoS) Database to analyze the contribution in supply chain mitigation literature by authors, themes in supply chain mitigation and the citing articles. An investigation based on bibliometric approach for the SLR represents the bibliographic data of over 530 publications between the years 2020–2021. Additionally, the article also develops graphical visualizations of the bibliographic data analyzed using the R-program Bibliometrix to ascertain the top sources, authors, keywords and conceptual themes.

Findings

Most strategies in the existing literature focused on reactive approaches to supply chain disruption and current mitigation literature has not evolved in parallel to the changing macro environment leaving a wide gap in considering vaccines as a supply chain mitigation strategy. Hence, this study identifies the potential need to focus on building proactive supply chain mitigation strategies preferably by studying the role of vaccines in mitigating supply chains.

Practical implications

This article helps the reader to understand the scientific research in terms of contributions in supply chain mitigation research since pandemic. Though, the time frame considered limits the connection the findings to previous work on supply chain disruptions and mitigation, it offers an understanding of the various mitigation themes evolved in light of mitigating the supply chain disruptions as one caused by the current pandemic. Further, this research helps us understand how businesses can help reduce the social consequences by preventing the disruptions and helping life normalize during this ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Originality/value

This is the first of its kind contribution offering a SLR of supply chain mitigation strategies during the COVID-19 pandemic identifying the focal themes in current literature and establishing the need for future venues of research studying the role of vaccines in supply chain mitigation strategies.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 April 2022

Nadeeshani Wanigarathna, Keith Jones, Federica Pascale, Mariantonietta Morga and Abdelghani Meslem

Recent earthquake-induced liquefaction events and associated losses have increased researchers’ interest into liquefaction risk reduction interventions. To the best of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent earthquake-induced liquefaction events and associated losses have increased researchers’ interest into liquefaction risk reduction interventions. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, there was no scholarly literature related to an economic appraisal of these risk reduction interventions. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the issues in applying cost–benefit analysis (CBA) principles to the evaluation of technical mitigations to reduce earthquake-induced liquefaction risk.

Design/methodology/approach

CBA has been substantially used for risk mitigation option appraisal for a number of hazard threats. Previous literature in the form of systematic reviews, individual research and case studies, together with liquefaction risk and loss modelling literature, was used to develop a theoretical model of CBA for earthquake-induced liquefaction mitigation interventions. The model was tested using a scenario in a two-day workshop.

Findings

Because liquefaction risk reduction techniques are relatively new, there is limited damage modelling and cost data available for use within CBAs. As such end users need to make significant assumptions when linking the results of technical investigations of damage to built-asset performance and probabilistic loss modelling resulting in many potential interventions being not cost-effective for low-impact disasters. This study questions whether a probabilistic approach should really be applied to localised rapid onset events like liquefaction, arguing that a deterministic approach for localised knowledge and context would be a better base for the cost-effectiveness mitigation interventions.

Originality/value

This paper makes an original contribution to literature through a critical review of CBA approaches applied to disaster mitigation interventions. Further, this paper identifies challenges and limitations of applying probabilistic based CBA models to localised rapid onset disaster events where human losses are minimal and historic data is sparse; challenging researchers to develop new deterministic based approaches that use localised knowledge and context to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of mitigation interventions.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2022

Neha Chhabra Roy and Sreeleakha Prabhakaran

This paper aims to focus on the different types of insider-led cyber frauds that gained mainstream attention in recent large-scale fraud events involving prominent Indian…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on the different types of insider-led cyber frauds that gained mainstream attention in recent large-scale fraud events involving prominent Indian banking institutions. In addition to identifying and classifying cyber fraud, the study maps them on a severity scale for optimal mitigation planning.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used for identification and classification is an analysis of a detailed literature review, a focus group discussion with risk and vigilance officers and cyber cell experts, as well as secondary data of cyber fraud losses. Through machine learning-based random forest, the authors predicted the future of insider-led cyber frauds in the Indian banking business and prioritized and predicted the same. The projected future reveals the dominance of a few specific cyber frauds, which will make it easier to develop a fraud mitigation model based on a victim-centric approach.

Findings

The paper concludes with a conceptual framework that can be used to ensure a sustainable cyber fraud mitigation ecosystem within the scope of the study. By using the findings of this research, policymakers and fraud investigators will be able to create a more robust environment for banks through timely detection of cyber fraud and prevent it appropriately before it happens.

Research limitations/implications

The study focuses on fraud, risk and mitigation from a victim-centric perspective and does not address it from the fraudster’s perspective. Data availability was a challenge. Banks are recommended to compile data that can be used for analysis both by themselves and other policymakers.

Practical implications

The structured, sustainable cyber fraud mitigation suggested in the study will provide an agile, quick, proactive, stakeholder-specific plan that helps to safeguard banks, employees, regulatory authorities, customers and the economy. It saves resources, cost and time for bank authorities and policymakers. The mitigation measures will also help improve the reputational status of the Indian banking business and prolong the banks’ sustenance.

Originality/value

The innovative cyber fraud mitigation approach contributes to the sustainability of a bank’s ecosystem quickly, proactively and effectively.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 January 2021

James Rayawan, Vinit S. Tipnis and Alfonso J. Pedraza-Martinez

The authors investigate the role of community engagement in the connection between disaster mitigation and disaster preparedness. Using a vulnerability-to-hazard framework…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors investigate the role of community engagement in the connection between disaster mitigation and disaster preparedness. Using a vulnerability-to-hazard framework built by the European Union, the authors study the case of Aceh province, Indonesia, which was hit hard by Asian tsunami in 2004.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design uses a single case study research. The authors study the case of Aceh province, Indonesia, by comparing improvements in disaster mitigation and disaster preparedness in a period longer than ten years beginning in 2004, right before the Asian tsunami that devastated the province. Aware that the connection between mitigation and preparedness is a broad research topic, the authors focus on the domain of pre-disaster evacuation.

Findings

The authors find that Aceh province has made substantial improvements in healthcare facilities and road quality (mitigation) as well as early alert systems and evacuation plans (preparedness). Socio-economic indicators of the community have improved substantially as well. However, there is a lack of safe sheltering areas as well as poor road signaling maintenance, which threatens the effectiveness of infrastructural improvements. The authors propose that community engagement would connect disaster mitigation and disaster preparedness. The connecting element is community-based maintenance of critical infrastructure such as road signals, which the government could facilitate by leveraging on operational transparency.

Research limitations/implications

The findings open avenues for future research on the actionable engagement of communities in disaster mitigation and disaster preparedness.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to three areas of humanitarian logistics research: disaster management cycle (DMC), pre-disaster evacuations and community engagement in disaster management.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

Keywords

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