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Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2011

Chu-Hsiang (Daisy) Chang and Samantha K. Baard

Given the increasing global focus of many aspects of our society, researchers have taken significant steps in understanding the impact of culture on various psychological…

Abstract

Given the increasing global focus of many aspects of our society, researchers have taken significant steps in understanding the impact of culture on various psychological states. This review focuses on the stressor–strain relationships within the context of cross-cultural and cross-national studies. Using research findings from the United States as a baseline, we identify common and unique themes concerning the stressor–strain relationships between different countries, and clarify the differences between cross-national and cross-cultural studies. Furthermore, we consider cross-cultural and cross-national occupational stress research from an individual differences perspective. We encourage future studies to adopt this perspective and carefully consider the implications of cultural values on occupational stress research at the individual, group, and country levels.

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The Role of Individual Differences in Occupational Stress and Well Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-711-7

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Hakan Erkutlu and Jamel Chafra

Drawing on the social exchange theory and the stressor-strain framework, the purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between leaders’ narcissism and employee

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the social exchange theory and the stressor-strain framework, the purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between leaders’ narcissism and employee’s organizational cynicism. Specifically, the authors take a relational approach by introducing employee’s psychological strain as the mediator. The moderating role of psychological capital in the relationship between leaders’ narcissism and employee’s cynicism is also considered.

Design/methodology/approach

The data of this study encompass 1,215 certified nurses from 15 university hospitals in Turkey. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was conducted to test the proposed model.

Findings

The statistical results of this study supported the positive effect of leaders’ narcissism on employee’s cynicism as well as the mediating effect of employee’s psychological strain. Moreover, when the level of psychological capital is high, the relationship between leaders’ narcissism and organizational cynicism is weak, whereas the effect is strong when the level of psychological capital is low.

Practical implications

The findings of this study suggest that managers in the healthcare industry should be sensitive in treating their subordinates, as it will lead to positive interpersonal relationship, which, in turn, will reduce employee cynicism. Moreover, managers should pay more attention to the buffering role of psychological capital for those employees with high psychological strain and showing organizational cynicism.

Originality/value

As the healthcare sector continues to go through a transformational change, it is important to identify organizational factors that affect employee attitudes. There is limited empirical evidence about the determinants of cynicism, particularly in the healthcare sector environment. This study contributes to the literature on organizational cynicism by revealing the relational mechanism between leaders’ narcissism and employee cynicism. The paper also offers a practical assistance to employees in the healthcare management and their leaders interested in building trust, increasing leader-employee relationship and reducing organizational cynicism.

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International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Book part
Publication date: 17 September 2014

Hannes Zacher, Daniel C. Feldman and Heiko Schulz

We develop a conceptual model, based on person-environment fit theory, which explains how employee age affects occupational strain and well-being. We begin by explaining…

Abstract

We develop a conceptual model, based on person-environment fit theory, which explains how employee age affects occupational strain and well-being. We begin by explaining how age directly affects different dimensions of objective and subjective P-E fit. Next, we illustrate how age can moderate the relationship between objective P-E fit and subjective P-E fit. Third, we discuss how age can moderate the relationships between P-E fit, on one hand, and occupational strain and well-being on the other. Fourth, we explain how age can impact occupational strain and well-being directly independent of P-E fit. The chapter concludes with implications for future research and practice.

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The Role of Demographics in Occupational Stress and Well Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-646-0

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Hannes Zacher and Heiko Schulz

In many countries, both the number of older people in need of care and the number of employed caregivers of elderly relatives will increase over the next decades. The…

Abstract

Purpose

In many countries, both the number of older people in need of care and the number of employed caregivers of elderly relatives will increase over the next decades. The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which perceived organizational, supervisor, and coworker support for eldercare reduce employed caregivers’ strain and weaken the relationship between eldercare demands and strain.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 100 employed caregivers from one organization.

Findings

Results showed that eldercare demands were positively related to strain, and perceived organizational eldercare support (POES) was negatively related to strain. In addition, high POES weakened the relationship between eldercare demands and strain.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional design and use of self-report scales constitute limitations of the study.

Practical implications

POES is a resource for employed caregivers, especially when their eldercare demands are high.

Originality/value

This research highlights the relative importance of different forms of perceived support for reducing employed caregivers’ strain and weakening the relationship between eldercare demands and strain.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2013

Cristina Rubino, Christa L. Wilkin and Ari Malka

Recent years have seen an explosion in the study of emotions in organizations, and although emotions play a central role in the job stress process, their role is largely…

Abstract

Recent years have seen an explosion in the study of emotions in organizations, and although emotions play a central role in the job stress process, their role is largely neglected in empirical stressor–strain studies. Our chapter aims to build consensus in the literature by showing that discrete emotions provide a mechanism through which stressors exert their impact on well-being. By examining a larger domain of stressors, emotions, and well-being, we begin to develop and expand upon the nomological network of emotions. In an effort to build on the job demands–resources (JD-R) model, which includes both job demands (i.e., negative stimuli such as time pressure) and resources (i.e., positive stimuli such as autonomy), we include both negative and positive discrete emotions with the expectation that negative emotions will generally be linked to demands and positive emotions will be linked to resources. We also propose that there may be circumstances where demands trigger negative discrete emotions and lead to greater experienced strain, and conversely, where resources arouse positive discrete emotions, which would positively affect well-being. The model in our chapter sheds light on how discrete emotions have different antecedents (i.e., job demands and resources) and outcomes (e.g., satisfaction, burnout, performance), and as such, respond to calls for research on this topic. Our findings will be of particular interest to organizations where employees can be trained to manage their emotions to reduce the strain associated with job stressors.

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The Role of Emotion and Emotion Regulation in Job Stress and Well Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-586-9

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Book part
Publication date: 9 September 2019

Maryana L. Arvan, Rachel C. Dreibelbis and Paul E. Spector

This chapter summarizes a meta-analysis of 72 studies (N= 20,701) that link customer mistreatment (abusive, nasty, and rude behavior of customers toward employees) to…

Abstract

This chapter summarizes a meta-analysis of 72 studies (N= 20,701) that link customer mistreatment (abusive, nasty, and rude behavior of customers toward employees) to psychological, attitudinal, and behavioral strains. Results showed that customer mistreatment related significantly to a variety of psychological and attitudinal strains (emotional exhaustion, emotional strain, job (dis)satisfaction, turnover intentions, perceived organizational support, and supervisor support) and behavioral strains (reduced customer service performance and counterproductive work behavior (CWB) directed toward organizations and customers). These results were similar to those found with general mistreatment, suggesting that mistreatment by organizational outsiders might have similar effects to mistreatment from organizational insiders. These results suggest a clear association of mistreatment with strains, but recent work is discussed that questions the typical assumption that mistreatment leads to CWB rather than the reverse.

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Examining the Role of Well-being in the Marketing Discipline
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-946-6

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2008

Hettie A. Richardson, Jixia Yang, Robert J. Vandenberg, David M. DeJoy and Mark G. Wilson

The purpose of this study is to examine when perceived organizational support (POS) may be more likely to play a mediator versus moderator role in stressor and strain

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine when perceived organizational support (POS) may be more likely to play a mediator versus moderator role in stressor and strain relationships by considering POS relative to challenge and hindrance stressors, cognitive/emotional and physical strains.

Design/methodology/approach

This cross‐sectional survey research was conducted in two samples (n=720, 829) of employees working for a large retail organization in the USA. Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

As hypothesized, results indicate POS mediates relationships between hindrance stressors and cognitive/emotional strains, but does not mediate relationships between challenge stressors and physical strains. POS does not moderate any of the relationships examined.

Originality/value

This paper is one of few studies to examine challenge and hindrance stressors and to examine POS relative to physical strains.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 20 January 2012

Randi L. Sims and Peng Sun

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between witnessing workplace bullying behavior and employee attitudes and intentions to turnover.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between witnessing workplace bullying behavior and employee attitudes and intentions to turnover.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 150 full‐time employees from two mid‐sized indigenous private manufacturing plants from the province of Henan, China were surveyed at a single point in time.

Findings

Findings indicate a negative relationship between witnessing workplace bullying and employee satisfaction and commitment. In addition, strain and satisfaction fully mediate the relationship between witnessing workplace bullying and employee intention to turnover.

Research limitations/implications

Given the link between witnessing workplace bullying and employee attitudes, it is important for Chinese managers to ensure that interactions with employees maintain a positive and professional tone.

Originality/value

The paper's findings suggest that it is not necessary for an employee to be the personal victim of bullying behavior, rather an employee need only be an observer of workplace bullying in order to experience increases in physical and emotional strain.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 27 January 2021

Tuan Trong Luu

This paper aims to unfold the mediation mechanism of job crafting, through which socially responsible human resource practices (SRHR practices) influence work…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to unfold the mediation mechanism of job crafting, through which socially responsible human resource practices (SRHR practices) influence work meaningfulness and job strain among hospitality employees. It also seeks to unravel the moderating effect of authentic leadership on this indirect relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Three survey waves were conducted to collect data from 825 employees and 128 managers from 34 four- or five-star hotels in two major cities in Vietnam. The data were analyzed through structural equation modeling to test the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

The results lent credence to the positive relationship between SRHR practices and employees’ meaningfulness of work as well as the negative nexus between SRHR practices and employees’ job strain. These relationships were mediated by employee engagement in job crafting. The results further revealed that authentic leadership functioned as a negative moderator for the impact of SRHR practices on job crafting as well as the indirect effects of SRHR practices on the two employee outcomes via job crafting.

Practical implications

The findings suggest to hospitality organizations that employees may find their work more meaningful and less stressful if they implement SRHR practices to enable them to craft their tasks. Hospitality organizations should also realize the role of authentic behavior among managers in stimulating employee job crafting behavior particularly when SRHR practices are not fully in place.

Originality/value

This study advances the understanding of the mechanisms that translate SRHR practices into hospitality employee outcomes. This work also extends the contingency perspective in the HRM literature by unraveling authentic leadership as a contingency for the impacts of SRHR practices.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

Jane E. Mullen and E. Kevin Kelloway

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between customer mistreatment and employee retaliation. The moderating effect of employee psychological strain on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between customer mistreatment and employee retaliation. The moderating effect of employee psychological strain on the relationship between customer mistreatment and employee retaliation is also examined.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 107 contact centre customer service representatives completed a survey. Moderated multiple regression analysis was conducted to examine the relationship between customer mistreatment and psychological strain on employee retaliation.

Findings

Customer mistreatment emerged as a significant predictor of employee retaliation against the customer (customer mistreatment: β=0.252, p<0.01), providing support for hypothesis 1. Psychological strain was found to significantly moderate the effects of customer mistreatment on employee retaliation against the customer, (β=0.197, p<0.01) supporting hypothesis 2.

Originality/value

The results provide a greater understanding of individuals’ responses to customer incivility. Previous research has demonstrated that uncivil customer behavior leads to emotional exhaustion and absences from work within the call centre industry. Our results suggest that call centre customer service employees may also engage in retaliatory behavior when they perceive that they have been treated unjustly by customers. The positive relationship between customer mistreatment and employee retaliation against customers was stronger when employees reported high (versus low) psychological strain.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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