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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Joana R.C. Kuntz and Mary Abbott

This paper aims to test a moderated mediation model linking person-environment fit with workplace outcomes (engagement, meaning at work and performance) through…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to test a moderated mediation model linking person-environment fit with workplace outcomes (engagement, meaning at work and performance) through authenticity (authentic living and self-alienation). Self-deception was included as a moderator of these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 163 employees in a large department using an online survey. The hypotheses were tested using the PROCESS Macro for SPSS, which conducts bootstrapped moderated mediation analyses.

Findings

Results showed that person-environment fit facets were positively related to engagement, meaning and performance through authentic living and negatively related through self-alienation. These relationships were significant at low to moderate levels of self-deception.

Research/limitations implications

Despite its small sample size, this study used a time-lagged design to mitigate the limitations associated with cross-sectional studies. Further, it expanded the research on authenticity in the workplace by illustrating the interplay of authenticity with fit, self-deception and workplace outcomes.

Practical implications

Organisations stand to gain from encouraging authenticity at work, and this can be achieved by ensuring person-environment fit. While self-deception can act as a protective factor against low perceptions of person-environment fit, organisations should strive to create a culture that values diversity and self-expression.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to explore authenticity at work and the first to empirically examine the authenticity and person-environment fit relationship in relation to outcomes, considering individual propensity for motivated bias.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1996

Ann Marie Ryan and Mark J. Schmit

Person—environment (P—E) fit has long been a focus in organizational research. A climate‐based measure of P—E Fit was developed for use in organizational and individual…

Abstract

Person—environment (P—E) fit has long been a focus in organizational research. A climate‐based measure of P—E Fit was developed for use in organizational and individual assessment. A series of studies with a Q‐sort measure of climate and fit (the Organizational Fit Instrument—OFI) indicated ways in which P—E fit information can be used in organizational development. In addition, the psychometric properties of the OFI assessed in these studies suggested that, despite the ipsative nature of the measure, it may provide the organizational development practitioner or researcher with a sound and useful tool. Suggestions for future research are proposed.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2019

Louzanne Bam, Katleen De Stobbeleir and PJ Vlok

Limited research where team creativity (TC) is positioned as an independent variable constitutes a weak point in the body of knowledge. This paper aims to offer three…

Abstract

Purpose

Limited research where team creativity (TC) is positioned as an independent variable constitutes a weak point in the body of knowledge. This paper aims to offer three contributions to address this research gap: empirical research that has been conducted on the outcomes of TC is summarized; a person–environment fit perspective is applied to develop a conceptual model for TC; and directions for future empirical research are proposed.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review is conducted to identify empirical research on the outcomes of TC. This is summarized into an extension of an existing framework that organizes empirical research on the antecedents of TC. Furthermore, the fit model for TC is developed, based on a person–environment fit perspective.

Findings

Research on the outcomes of TC has focused on three themes: performance; affective state; and processes. Gaps in this body of knowledge include limited knowledge on performance outcomes and a lack of research on potential negative outcomes. Recommendations for future research include: potential moderators of the relationship between TC and two outcome, innovation and team performance, are proposed; strain and unethical decision-making are proposed as potential negative outcomes of TC; and it is proposed that incorporating a temporal dimension would improve the understanding of the cyclical manner in which certain variables and TC may interact over time.

Originality/value

The organizing framework extension summarizes existing knowledge on the outcomes of TC, and together with the fit model for TC, this offers a basis for identifying research gaps and directions for future research. Specific directions for future empirical research are proposed.

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Mert Aktaş

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating influence of idiocentrism and allocentrism on person-organization fit, person-job fit and work attitudes relationship.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating influence of idiocentrism and allocentrism on person-organization fit, person-job fit and work attitudes relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey data were collected from 426 employees of a holding company.

Findings

The results reveal that allocentrism makes a difference in fitting the particular aspect of work environment for the individual. Results showed that allocentrism positively moderates person-organization fit and job satisfaction and organizational commitment and turnover relationship. However, no moderating influence of idiocentrism was found on person-organization fit and employee attitude relationship. Furthermore, it was also found that neither idiocentrism nor allocentrism moderated the relationship between the person-job fit and employee attitudes relationship.

Originality/value

This research adds a cultural component to the person-environment fit research.

Details

Cross Cultural Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Zhenya Tang, Leida Chen and Mark L. Gillenson

Companies create brand fan pages (BFPs) on social media platforms to broadcast product information, increase brand awareness and engage customers. A common challenge…

Abstract

Purpose

Companies create brand fan pages (BFPs) on social media platforms to broadcast product information, increase brand awareness and engage customers. A common challenge facing BFPs is how to attract and retain followers effectively. Through the lens of the theory of person–environment fit (TPEF), the purpose of this paper is to develop and validate a theoretical model to explain the role of multidimensional fit perceptions in cultivating BFP users’ continued following intention.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collected from 193 active followers of BFPs on Sina Weibo, the most prevalent social media platform in China, were used to test the proposed model. The partial least squares method was employed to assess the relationships in the model.

Findings

The findings reveal that users will continue to follow the BFP if their needs align with what the BFP provides, and if they perceive their values and characteristics to match those of the brand and fellow followers.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to extend the research context of the TPEF from organizational behaviors to examining how perceived fit influences users’ continued intention to follow in the social media context. In addition to the theoretical contributions, the findings of this study have important implications for practitioners who undertake social media management or user behavior analysis.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2020

David R. White, Michael J. Kyle and Joseph Schafer

Police officer perceptions of their own legitimacy can be important in shaping aspects of their performance and other organizational outcomes. The current study uses…

Abstract

Purpose

Police officer perceptions of their own legitimacy can be important in shaping aspects of their performance and other organizational outcomes. The current study uses person-environment fit theory to assess the effects of value congruence with top managers, immediate supervisors and coworkers on officers' perceptions of self-legitimacy.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a cross-sectional survey of nearly 250 front-line police officers from seven municipal police departments in Michigan, Indiana and Kentucky to examine the effects of perceived value congruence on officers’ self-legitimacy. A hierarchical model of fit is assessed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Findings demonstrate that value congruence positively relates to officers’ reported self-legitimacy, suggesting that officers who perceive greater similarity in values with others in the organization will express more confidence in their authority.

Originality/value

Our findings add to research on police officers’ self-legitimacy, and the use of a hierarchical model of person-environment fit might offer implications for future research on police culture.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 43 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 November 2020

Chongrui Liu, Cong Wang and Hongjie Wang

Although a plethora of literature has developed person–job fit theory, how leaders' emotions affect followers' person–job fit has received insufficient attention. Drawing…

Abstract

Purpose

Although a plethora of literature has developed person–job fit theory, how leaders' emotions affect followers' person–job fit has received insufficient attention. Drawing on emotions as social information (EASI) theory, the present research study investigated the impact of leaders' positive emotions on person–job fit and further explained the mediating role of psychological safety and the moderating effect of organizational identification.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 319 Chinese employees nested in 67 teams, and a cross-level design was adopted to examine the research hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicated that individual-level psychological safety played a mediating role in the cross-level relationship between team-directed leaders' positive emotions and individual-level person–job fit. Moreover, the authors found a cross-level moderating effect of team-level organizational identification.

Practical implications

This present research empirically showed that leaders displaying positive emotions in the workplace benefited followers' perceptions of psychological safety, which in turn improved followers' attitudes towards their job in management practice. In addition, organizational identification could positively advance this process.

Originality/value

This study is the first to evaluate the operational mechanism of leaders' emotion on followers' perceived person–job fit in the Chinese context. Person–job fit has primarily been investigated as a driver of employee outcomes in the previous research studies. These studies focussed on whether and how leaders' emotions improve followers' person–job fit.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Hayward P. Andres and Obasi H. Akan

The purpose of this paper is to determine if “fit” and “non-fit” between authoritarian versus demonstrator teaching and visual versus verbal learning preferences differ in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine if “fit” and “non-fit” between authoritarian versus demonstrator teaching and visual versus verbal learning preferences differ in impact on Chinese MBA student academic performance in a large local urban Chinese university setting. In addition, the role of Chinese cultural behavioral tendencies in dictating specific teaching and learning style preferences among Chinese MBA students is also examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Subjects were 135 Chinese MBA students that indicated their learning style preference (verbal or visual) and predominant teaching style encountered (authoritarian or demonstrator). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) main effects were used to identify the best teaching style and best learning style. ANOVA interaction effects were used to test the meshing hypothesis (i.e. teaching-learning style “fit” versus “non-fit” conditions).

Findings

The results provided support for the mesh hypothesis – teaching style – learning style fit does matter. In general, authoritarian teaching was superior to demonstrator, and verbal learning was superior to visual. Findings also suggest that the demonstrator teaching style may better handle different learning styles (e.g. both verbal and visual) simultaneously as compared to the classic authoritarian teaching style.

Research limitations/implications

The findings support and contribute to the body of knowledge about the mesh hypothesis and provide the foundations for further longitudinal studies evaluating teaching and learning styles learning styles in a multicultural and cross-cultural context. A limitation of the study is that self-report responses were used and the data were collected at one Chinese university.

Practical implications

The results suggest that instructors are likely to reach only a selected few students if it is assumed that all students learn in the same way or based on cultural orientation alone. University administrators should be aware of the role of cultural tendencies related to teaching and learning and how cross-cultural communication and multicultural awareness can provide insights into strategies for social and academic integration of foreign students.

Originality/value

To date, the meshing hypothesis has received far less theoretical or empirical attention than the general learning style and teaching style hypotheses. This study addresses that gap.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Gary N. Burns, Levi R. G. Nieminen, Lindsey Kotrba and Daniel Denison

On a global scale, leadership takes place within a complex environment that is molded both by national culture and organizational culture influences. This chapter explores…

Abstract

On a global scale, leadership takes place within a complex environment that is molded both by national culture and organizational culture influences. This chapter explores leader-culture (L-C) fit in this global context. Drawing together distinct perspectives on national culture and organizational culture, we identify potential contingencies of L-C fit across these levels. In addition to identifying key gaps and areas for future exploration, we also discuss the practical uses of fit when selecting and developing leaders. Overall, we argue that researchers and practitioners could benefit from an expanded perspective on cultural fit to simultaneously address aspects of national and organizational culture.

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-479-4

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Jee Young Seong and Amy L. Kristof‐Brown

This study seeks to investigate the multidimensionality person‐group (PG) fit. It first aims to examine values‐based, personality‐based, and KSA‐based fit as distinct PG…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to investigate the multidimensionality person‐group (PG) fit. It first aims to examine values‐based, personality‐based, and KSA‐based fit as distinct PG fit dimensions. It then also aims to examine fit as an aggregate construct (each dimension combines to form a latent PG fit construct), and as a superordinate construct (an overarching assessment of compatibility drives the individual fit dimensions). It also aims to propose that the distinct dimensions or the overall perception predict commitment to team, employee voice, and knowledge sharing, resulting in a final outcome of employee task performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using longitudinal survey methodology from three different sources (793 employees, their supervisors and the Human Resources department) in a manufacturing firm in Korea. The various models were evaluated using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The distinct dimensions model, in which values‐based fit predicted commitment to the team, personality‐based fit predicted voice behaviors, and KSA‐based fit predicted knowledge sharing, was mostly supported. Each of these intermediary factors predicted supervisors' ratings of individual task performance. Although each dimension had unique impact on the outcomes, results suggested that a superordinate PG construct might be driving the more specific fit assessments. The aggregate model was not supported.

Originality/value

This study is the first to show how different dimensions of PG fit may differentially influence affect and behavior, to predict task performance. It also shows the first evidence for PG fit as a superordinate multidimensional construct. Results provide a basis for new knowledge regarding the multi‐faceted relationship between fit perceptions and outcomes.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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