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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2020

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

The study finds that well-being oriented HRM practices in Germany fall into four different configurations, meaning that employees do not receive equal well-being benefits. Moving from low investment HRM to medium investment HRM is linked to increased health, happiness and relational well-being. However, moving from medium to higher investment HRM does not necessarily lead to similar increases. Instead, higher levels of employee well-being are associated with support and development practices delivered by immediate supervisors and line managers.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest , vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

Juliet Michaelson

The purpose of this article is to first introduce, and then review the uses of, the Five Ways to Well‐being communication messages and the dynamic model of well‐being

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to first introduce, and then review the uses of, the Five Ways to Well‐being communication messages and the dynamic model of well‐being, developed by the new economics foundation (nef) for the 2008 Foresight Project on Mental Capital and Wellbeing.

Design/methodology/approach

The article describes an informal review of those uses of the Five Ways to Well‐being and the dynamic model of well‐being which have come to nef's attention.

Findings

The Five Ways to Well‐being messages are found to have been widely used, both in public health and a variety of other settings. They have been used: to directly promote well‐being to individuals; to help frame organisational strategy; and indirectly, in initiatives with headline objectives other than promoting well‐being. A number of examples of their use are given in different contexts. The dynamic model of well‐being is shown to be a deep influence on nef's continuing well‐being work and the work of those influenced in turn by nef, particularly in ensuring that policy and practice takes account of both external conditions as well as personal resources; and of people's feelings as well as their functioning.

Practical implications

Future directions for nef's work are highlighted, particularly measurement of involvement in the Five Ways to Well‐being activities and exploration of the ways in which different well‐being measures impact on policy.

Originality/value

The article provides, for the first time, an overview of how nef's contributions to the Foresight Project have been used since their publication, and will be of interest to those in a range of policy and practice settings who value real‐life examples of the implementation of a “well‐being approach”.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Talat Islam, Muhammad Ali, Saqib Jamil and Hafiz Fawad Ali

This study aims to investigate individual-related consequences of workplace bullying among the health-care section. Specifically, this study examined the mediating role of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate individual-related consequences of workplace bullying among the health-care section. Specifically, this study examined the mediating role of burnout between workplace bullying and nurses’ well-being. Moreover, passive avoidant leadership is examined as a conditional variable between workplace bullying and burnout.

Design/methodology/approach

This study collected data from 314 nurses working in various hospitals through a questionnaire-based survey using Google Form in two waves.

Findings

Structural equation modeling confirmed the negative effect of workplace bullying on nurses’ well-being, whereas burnout mediates this relationship. In addition, passive avoidant leadership was identified as a conditional variable that strengthens the positive association between workplace bullying and burnout.

Research limitations/implications

Although data for the study were collected in two waves, still cross-sectional design limits causality.

Practical implications

This study suggests management to focus on developing and implementing counter-bullying rules to avoid the adverse consequences of workplace bullying (e.g. capital loss, recruitment costs, burnout, well-being, etc.). In addition, leaders/supervisors must be trained to fulfill their responsibilities to reduce negative consequences.

Originality/value

Studies on workplace bullying in high-power distance cultures are scant. Therefore, drawing upon conservation of resource theory, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study that has investigated the moderating role of passive avoidant leadership on the association between workplace bullying and burnout.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2021

Min Zhang and Yixuan Zhao

Based on previous research on millennial employee management in China, this study aims to extend the understanding of the underlining mechanisms and boundary conditions…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on previous research on millennial employee management in China, this study aims to extend the understanding of the underlining mechanisms and boundary conditions between job characteristics and millennial employee creative performance. Drawing on the self-determination theory and the theory of situation interaction, this study proposes hedonic and eudaimonic well-being as dual mediators, to explain the positive effect of job characteristics on millennial employees’ creative performance. Further, the study proposes that inclusive leadership and achieving styles could separately moderate these two mediation paths.

Design/methodology/approach

The data comprises information on 288 millennial employees in China.

Findings

The results show that both hedonic and eudaimonic well-being mediate the positive effect of job characteristics on millennial employees’ creative performance. The positive effect of job characteristics on millennial employees’ hedonic well-being is stronger when inclusive leadership is stronger; and the positive effect of millennial employees’ hedonic well-being on creative performance is stronger when direct achieving style and instrumental achieving style are stronger. There was no significant moderating effect of inclusive leadership on the relationship between job characteristics and millennial employees’ eudaimonic well-being, and no significant moderating effect of achieving style on the relationship between millennial employees’ eudaimonic well-being and creative performance. Job characteristics exerted a positive indirect effect on employees’ creative performance through employees’ hedonic well-being and that this cascading effect was moderated by inclusive leadership, direct achieving style and instrumental achieving style.

Practical implications

The findings have important implications for both job design practices and employee performance research. Organizations should pay more attention to improving the creative performance of millennials employees through innovative job design or other organizational level motivational drivers. At the same time, the findings in this study align with the findings in Sheldon et al. (2018) study where extrinsic values rather than toward intrinsic values will bring improved hedonic well-being to the individual in the short term. One further practical implication is that if organizations need a short-term boost of creative performance from their millennial employees, organizations can provide more extrinsic motivators. When organizations want to see more long-term creative performance results, intrinsic motivators should be established.

Originality/value

As part of a series of research on Chinese millennial employee management, this paper extends existing research results. First, the authors verify the main effect relationship between job characteristics and employee creative performance. Second, based on the self-determination theory, this study constructs a dual mediation model and tests the mediating effect of hedonic and eudaimonic well-being between job characteristics and employee creative performance. Third, considering the situational characteristics of the study, the authors propose the boundary conditions of the relationship between job characteristics and creative performance from two levels of individual characteristics and leadership types, namely, inclusive leadership and achieving style.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Anushree Karani and Swapnil Abhishek Mehta

The study aimed at understanding the relationship between supervisor and coworker support, psychological contract fulfillment, work engagement, well-being (different…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aimed at understanding the relationship between supervisor and coworker support, psychological contract fulfillment, work engagement, well-being (different forms) and innovative behavior in the digitized workspace during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via a structured questionnaire through Google Docs from 239 respondents working in the sales department of the consumer durable industry through snowball sampling.

Findings

Supervisor and coworker support was positively contributing to psychological contract fulfillment. Further, psychological contract fulfillment was positively contributing to work engagement. Along with innovative behavior, four forms of well-being, i.e. emotional, psychological, workspace and life were studied as outcome variables. Work engagement positively contributes to innovative behavior and well-being.

Research limitations/implications

The study examined the relationship between various organizational variables in consumer durable industry. Future work should involve studying the effect in other industries and functional areas.

Practical implications

The study examined how the supervisor and coworker act as an enabler in fulfilling the psychological contract in the digitized workspace. Organizations also understand the importance of work engagement in maintaining well-being and innovative behavior.

Originality/value

The paper initiates the important debate on well-being and innovative behavior in the digitized workspace for the sales employees of the consumer durable industry.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Katrin Leifels and Paul Bowen

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between cultural diversity in teams and team members' individual well-being. The paper further explores the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between cultural diversity in teams and team members' individual well-being. The paper further explores the relationship between social resources, social stressors, team member well-being and the influence of the type of team individuals are working in (mono- vs. multicultural), gender and individualism/collectivism (IC).

Design/methodology/approach

Using data collected via an online survey, the authors analyzed 659 responses from individuals working in mono- and multicultural work teams. A theoretical model explaining the influence of social stressors, social resources, and social and demographic variables was proposed and tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results indicate that members of multicultural work teams perceive significantly more social stressors and lower levels of social resources than do members of monocultural teams. Higher levels of social stressors suggest decreased psychological well-being, while social resources have an indirect positive effect on psychological well-being. Furthermore, personal characteristics, namely, individualism and gender, have direct effects on the perception of social stressors and indirect effects on team member well-being.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates that cultural diversity in teams can influence the social stressors and resources that individual team members experience. Moreover, the pivotal role of social resources in the facilitation of team member well-being is highlighted primarily through its direct effect on social stressors and its concomitant indirect effect on well-being.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2021

Sonia Schifano, Andrew E. Clark, Samuel Greiff, Claus Vögele and Conchita D'Ambrosio

The authors track the well-being of individuals across five European countries during the course of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and relate their…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors track the well-being of individuals across five European countries during the course of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and relate their well-being to working from home. The authors also consider the role of pandemic-policy stringency in affecting well-being in Europe.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors have four waves of novel harmonised longitudinal data in France, Italy, Germany, Spain and Sweden, covering the period May–November 2020. Well-being is measured in five dimensions: life satisfaction, a worthwhile life, loneliness, depression and anxiety. A retrospective diary indicates whether the individual was working in each month since February 2020 and if so whether at home or not at home. Policy stringency is matched in per country at the daily level. The authors consider both cross-section and panel regressions and the mediating and moderating effects of control variables, including household variables and income.

Findings

Well-being among workers is lower for those who work from home, and those who are not working have the lowest well-being of all. The panel results are more mitigated, with switching into working at home yielding a small drop in anxiety. The panel and cross-section difference could reflect adaptation or the selection of certain types of individuals into working at home. Policy stringency is always negatively correlated with well-being. The authors find no mediation effects. The well-being penalty from working at home is larger for the older, the better-educated, those with young children and those with more crowded housing.

Originality/value

The harmonised cross-country panel data on individuals' experiences during COVID-19 are novel. The authors relate working from home and policy stringency to multiple well-being measures. The authors emphasise the effect of working from home on not only the level of well-being but also its distribution.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2021

Muhammad S. Tahir, Abdullahi D. Ahmed and Daniel W. Richards

This study aims to test a moderated mediation model for a twofold purpose. First, to examine the mediating role of financial capability (FC) in the association between…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to test a moderated mediation model for a twofold purpose. First, to examine the mediating role of financial capability (FC) in the association between financial literacy (FL) and financial well-being (FW). Second, to analyze if non-impulsive future-oriented behavior (NIB) moderates the associations of FL with FC and FL with FW.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use the PROCESS macros in IBM SPSS Statistics to test the moderated mediation model and analyze the 2016 wave of the Household, Income and Labor Dynamics in Australia Survey.

Findings

The empirical analysis shows that FC partially mediates the association between FL and FW. Furthermore, the moderated mediation analysis shows that NIB strengthens the associations of FL with FC and FL with FW. Specifically, the positive associations of FL with FC and FL with FW significantly increase for those consumers who score high on NIB.

Practical implications

The findings have implications for the financial services industry. Professional financial planners can positively improve the ability of consumers to deal with their financial matters by highlighting the importance of FL and NIB.

Social implications

The study findings suggest educating consumers to discourage impulsive behavior and encourage them to create financial plans as it will enhance their ability to conduct financial tasks efficiently, improving their FW.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to assess a moderated mediation model, which examines the role of FC as a mediator variable and NIB as a moderator variable in the association between FL and FW.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2021

Bahadur Ali Soomro and Naimatullah Shah

In the present era, entrepreneurs’ well-being is considered a significant factor owing to its strong relationship with entrepreneurship. Therefore, this study aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

In the present era, entrepreneurs’ well-being is considered a significant factor owing to its strong relationship with entrepreneurship. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the relationship between fear of failure and entrepreneurs’ well-being through the mediating effect of procrastination.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is descriptive, with cross-sectional data obtained through a survey questionnaire distributed randomly in Pakistan. Overall, data from 346 valid cases were used to achieve suitable study outcomes.

Findings

This study’s empirical findings highlight the negative effect of fear of failure on subjective well-being. Fear of failure is found to have a significant positive effect on procrastination. Furthermore, procrastination has a negative effect on subjective well-being. Finally, procrastination has a negative role in mediating the relationship between fear of failure and subjective well-being.

Practical implications

The conceptualization of the fear of failure and procrastination (direct and indirect) in relation to subjective well-being may offer a novel contribution in terms of a framework, policymaking and practice. Policymakers, top management and the government may consider the hindering effects of procrastination and fear of failure on entrepreneurs’ well-being and ventures’ success. The study findings may also enrich views in the literature on entrepreneurship and management, particularly in the developing country context.

Originality/value

This study could be helpful in eradicating the traps of procrastination and fear of failure, raising entrepreneurs’ confidence and levels of activity.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2021

Naeem Aslam, Kanwal Shafique and Ammar Ahmed

Fear of COVID-19 is one of the pivotal components that have generated higher levels of stress, obsessions and anxiety among the adult population, thus creating numerous…

Abstract

Purpose

Fear of COVID-19 is one of the pivotal components that have generated higher levels of stress, obsessions and anxiety among the adult population, thus creating numerous mental health issues. The purpose of this study was to evaluate psychological well-being based on COVID-19-related fear, obsessions and anxiety during the pandemic situation.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study aimed to evaluate the relationship between COVID-19-related fear, obsessions, anxiety, stress and well-being among adult populations. Additionally, the aim was to see the impact of COVID-19-related fear, obsessions, anxiety and stress on well-being. This was a cross-sectional study based on nonclinical sample of (n = 250) adults; data was obtained via online questionnaire survey method and analysis was performed by using the statistical package for social sciences (SPSS-22).

Findings

The authors’ findings based on descriptive statistics showed that COVID-19-related fear and obsessions were positively associated with COVID anxiety and stress and negatively associated with well-being. COVID anxiety was positively associated with stress and negatively associated with well-being. Moreover, perceived stress is negatively associated with well-being. The results additionally provide the outcome/conclusion that COVID-related anxiety significantly negatively predicted the psychological well-being. Overall the model explained 24% of the variance in psychological well-being. Females scored significantly high in COVID-19-related anxiety and obsessions as compared to males.

Research limitations/implications

A distinctive feature of this study is the understanding of COVID-19-related fear, obsessions, anxiety, stress and well-being among adult populations, and the findings are highlighting the need for psychological and social interventions for this specific population; therefore, immediate attention is needed by the clinical health professionals dealing with mental health issues.

Originality/value

There is a vital need to explore and develop psychological interventions aiming at the negative consequences being faced by the adult populations due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the impending second wave that will expose individuals to various mental health issues evolving because of the health crisis.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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