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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2020

Jennifer Loh and Robyn Snyman

The purpose of this paper is to test a moderated mediation model that links the experience of cyberbullying, perceived stress and job satisfaction among Australian employees.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test a moderated mediation model that links the experience of cyberbullying, perceived stress and job satisfaction among Australian employees.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 254 white collar Australian employees was conducted from a wide variety of business corporations to investigate the role of workplace cyberbullying and job outcomes. A moderated mediation analysis was conducted.

Findings

Results indicated that workplace cyberbullying resulted in perceived stress, which in turn predicted employee’s job dissatisfaction. The results further revealed that cyberbullied female employees as opposed to male employees were more likely to report greater perceived stress and to be dissatisfied in their job.

Research limitations/implications

Overall, the results suggest that cyberbullying is a potential resource drain for employees and has detrimental implications in their organisational life. Importantly, male and female employees reacted to workplace cyberbullying differently suggesting the need to address the issue of workplace cyberbullying more gender sensitively.

Originality/value

This study provides empirical evidence that workplace cyberbullying can be a gendered phenomenon. Furthermore, COR theory and gender role theory is combined to reveal the differences between men and women in terms of their vulnerability towards different stressors.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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A Meaningful Life at Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-767-2

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2020

Masood Nawaz Kalyar, Munazza Saeed, Aydin Usta and Imran Shafique

This study aims to investigate the effects of workplace cyberbullying on creativity directly and through psychological distress. Furthermore, this study proposes that…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the effects of workplace cyberbullying on creativity directly and through psychological distress. Furthermore, this study proposes that psychological capital (PsyCap) buffers the harmful effects of workplace cyberbullying on psychological distress and creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected in two waves from 329 nurses working in four large public hospitals located in a metropolitan city of Pakistan. The data were analyzed through PROCESS (Model 8) using SPSS.

Findings

The results demonstrate that cyberbullying negatively affects creativity through increased psychological distress. The findings also explicate that PsyCap moderates the effects of cyberbullying on psychological distress such that the link was weak (vs strong) for those (victims) who had high (vs low) PsyCap.

Practical implications

This study recommends management to develop and promote PsyCap among employees because these positive resources help them to regulate their emotions and cognition to overcome negative consequences of cyberbullying and other workplace stressors.

Originality/value

Psychological distress as an underlying mechanism between cyberbullying and creativity as well as buffering effect of PsyCap is the novelty of the study.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2017

Wayne Heatherington and Iain Coyne

Little research has explored individual experiences of cyberbullying in working contexts. To start bridging the gap in our current understanding, we used Interpretative…

Abstract

Little research has explored individual experiences of cyberbullying in working contexts. To start bridging the gap in our current understanding, we used Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) to explore individuals' shared experiences of cyberbullying encountered through work. In-depth interviews, conducted with five cyberbullied workers from the pharmaceutical, charity and university sectors, resulted in five superordinate themes: attributions of causality; crossing of boundaries; influence of communication media richness on relationship development; influence of communication explicitness and openness; and strategies for coping. Overall, some similarities emerged between cyberbullying experiences and traditional bullying research, yet the complexities associated with managing relationships, both virtually and physically, were central to individuals' subjective experiences. Practical implications in developing effective leadership and business policies to support virtual groups and manage behaviours are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2021

Wajeeha Mushtaq, Ahmad Qammar, Imran Shafique and Zafar-Uz-Zaman Anjum

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of cyberbullying at work on employee creativity with moderating role of family social support (FSS) and mediating…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of cyberbullying at work on employee creativity with moderating role of family social support (FSS) and mediating role of job burnout.

Design/methodology/approach

Using convenience sampling technique, data were collected from 212 employees working in manufacturing sector. The partial least square-structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Results reveal that cyberbullying has found to be negatively associated with employee creativity and positively linked with job burnout. Furthermore, job burnout has negative connection with employee creativity; however, job burnout does not mediate the link between cyberbullying and creativity.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides comprehensive insights in the literature about the negative workplace context (cyberbullying) as antecedent, job-linked psychological exhaustion (job burnout) as mediation and generation of original thoughts by employees (employee creativity) as consequence.

Originality/value

Examination of FSS as coping strategy and job burnout as underlying mechanism between the cyberbullying and employee creativity is the novelty of the present research.

Details

foresight, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

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A Meaningful Life at Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-767-2

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Tuija Muhonen, Sandra Jönsson and Martin Bäckström

The purpose of this paper is to explore health- and work-related outcomes of cyberbullying behaviour and the potential mediating role of social organisational climate…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore health- and work-related outcomes of cyberbullying behaviour and the potential mediating role of social organisational climate, social support from colleagues and social support from superiors.

Design/methodology/approach

Altogether 3,371 respondents participated in a questionnaire study.

Findings

The results of this study indicate that social organisational climate can have a mediating role in the relationship between cyberbullying behaviour and health, well-being, work engagement and intention to quit. Contrary to earlier face-to-face bullying research, the current study showed that cyberbullying behaviour had stronger indirect than direct relationships to health, well-being, work engagement and intention to quit.

Practical implications

Communication through digital devices in work life is becoming more prevalent, which in turn increases the risk for cyberbullying behaviour. Organisations need therefore to develop occupational health and safety policies concerning the use of digital communication and social media in order to prevent cyberbullying behaviour and its negative consequences.

Originality/value

Cyberbullying behaviour among working adults is a relatively unexplored phenomenon and therefore this study makes valuable contribution to the research field.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Premilla D’Cruz and Ernesto Noronha

The purpose of this paper is to report a study of targets’ experiences of cyberbullying on online labour markets (OLMs). In addition to highlighting the link between…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report a study of targets’ experiences of cyberbullying on online labour markets (OLMs). In addition to highlighting the link between targets’ coping and power and control, the paper compares conventional and digital workplaces.

Design/methodology/approach

The method of critical hermeneutic phenomenology is used in the inquiry, bringing political and applied dimensions into the study. Targets’ lived experiences, developed as case studies, were explored via conversational interviews. Thematic analysis was undertaken ideographically, followed by ideology-critique at a nomothetic level. Adopting the psychological/behavioural lens of coping theory, ideology-critique identified micro-level schemas and macro-level ideologies that perpetuate target disenfranchisement. Critical hermeneutic phenomenology illuminates the mutuality between individual and social processes, opening new doors to address power inequities through emancipation.

Findings

Hermeneutic phenomenology uncovered the core theme of “pursuing holistic and long-term well-being”, capturing targets’ attempts at working through their experiences of bullying without jeopardising their position on the OLM. Ideology-critique went beyond highlighting problem-focussed and emotion-focussed coping strategies that empowered targets to indicate how participants’ mindsets, anchored in ongoing circumstantial discourses and long-standing social cognitions, inhibited them from questioning the status quo and exploring alternative coping strategies like legislation and collectivisation, thereby curbing their agency. The findings were theorised in terms of power and control vis-à-vis the unique attributes of workplace cyberbullying, comparing and contrasting conventional and virtual workplaces.

Research limitations/implications

The inquiry is limited to the Upwork platform. Including other OLMs will enhance theoretical generalisability.

Practical implications

The study feeds into praxis by alerting digital workers in general and targets in particular about their circumstances, setting the stage for mobilisation.

Originality/value

The study makes several pioneering contributions. First, it reports the first empirical inquiry examining bullying in digital workplaces, importantly, also extending knowledge on cyberbullying across conventional versus digital workplaces. Moreover, OLM research on abuse and harassment has not been undertaken so far. Second, methodologically, the inquiry illustrates the combination of hermeneutic phenomenology with ideology-critique, taking the rare steps of joining ontological perspectives conventionally viewed as divergent and of incorporating a largely neglected micro-level focus into ideology-critique. Third, it furthers theoretical insights into power and control in workplace bullying while drawing links with coping.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2020

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Online harassment and cyberbullying is on the increase in the workplace. Cyberbullying can be anonymous, widespread and permanently online. This causes much mental stress and distress for the victim, leading to a reduction in personal resources such as time and energy while they deal with the threat. This leads to decreased motivation, reduced job satisfaction, and potential intent to leave the company. This effect is gendered, with females more likely to report higher perceived stress and job dissatisfaction than males. Companies need to have comprehensive and transparent gender-specific policies in place to reduce workplace stress and increase employee job satisfaction.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest , vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Premilla D’Cruz and Ernesto Noronha

The purpose of this paper is to report a study of bullying on online labour markets (OLMs), highlighting how abuse unfolds in digital workplaces and depicting the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report a study of bullying on online labour markets (OLMs), highlighting how abuse unfolds in digital workplaces and depicting the trajectory of target resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting van Manen’s hermeneutic phenomenology, targets’ lived experiences of bullying on OLMs was explored. Data gathered from Indian freelancers located on Upwork via conversational telephonic interviews were subjected to sententious and selective thematic analyses.

Findings

The core theme of “pursuing long-term and holistic well-being” showed how targets tapped into yet augmented their resilience while navigating the features of OLMs as they coped with their experiences of bullying. The interface between targets’ internal and external resources, including platform support, vis-à-vis the concreteness and permanence of the site as targets asserted agency, sought control and realized positive outcomes while preserving their reputation, relationality, success and continuity was captured. It may be noted that bullying in digital workplaces is exclusively virtual in form.

Research limitations/implications

Alongside theoretical generalizability, statistical generalizability of the findings should be established.

Practical implications

Recommendations for action for platforms and targets are forwarded. In particular, the critical role of formal workplace support in influencing employee resilience is emphasized.

Originality/value

The paper makes several pioneering contributions. First, it reports the first empirical inquiry examining bullying in digital workplaces. Moreover, OLM research on abuse and harassment has not been undertaken so far. Second, it furthers theorization of resilience, especially with regard to workplace antecedents. Apart from identifying the new organizational antecedent of formal workplace support, it uncovers the complexities of resilience. Third, it extends knowledge on workplace cyberbullying, positive outcomes of workplace bullying and OLMs in India.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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