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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2019

Debora Jeske, Annalisa Setti and Daisy Beth Gibbons

It is well-known that stereotypes on aging and perceptions about the suitability of certain jobs for certain age groups can influence performance ratings. However, it is…

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Abstract

Purpose

It is well-known that stereotypes on aging and perceptions about the suitability of certain jobs for certain age groups can influence performance ratings. However, it is unclear whether and how subjective views on aging are associated with judgment on someone else’s performance. The purpose of this study is to explore the role of aging perceptions and images of aging on performance ratings for a fictitious set of male candidates with different age and job profiles. Ratings of interest were job suitability, developmental potential, interpersonal skills and performance capacity.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an online survey format, data was collected from 203 Irish and UK employees to assess how they evaluated different fictitious candidates for a local development committee. The age and mentorship status of the candidates were also manipulated.

Findings

The age or mentoring status of the candidate did not play a significant role in how they were rated. Multiple regression analyses indicated, however, that participants’ aging perceptions and aging images had a significantly positive influence on how they rated the fictitious candidates (after controlling for participant variables such as age and experience). However, positive images of aging and aging perceptions on the part of the participants predicted more positive overall job suitability ratings, developmental potential, interpersonal skills and performance capacity. When the participants had more negative views on aging, they would also allocate lower ratings.

Originality/value

The results indicate that employee attitudes about aging play a role in how they will rate others. Given the importance of potential rating bias, the authors propose a number of training interventions that human resource professionals may be able to carry out to positively shape the informational basis for more negative aging attitudes.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2022

Guisheng Gan, Shiqi Chen, Liujie Jiang, Qianzhu Xu, Tian Huang, Dayong Cheng and Xin Liu

This study aims to evaluate the effect of thermal aging temperature on the properties of Cu/Al joints.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate the effect of thermal aging temperature on the properties of Cu/Al joints.

Design/methodology/approach

A new method in which 1 µm Zn-particles and SAC0307 with a particle size of 25–38 µm were mixed to fill the joint and successfully achieved the micro-joining of Cu/Al under ultrasonic-assisted at 200°C, and then, the effect of aging temperature on the properties of Cu/Al joints at different aging times was researched.

Findings

The results showed that the Cu interface intermetallic compounds (IMCs) had the same composition and had two layers with Cu5Zn8 near the Cu substrate and CuZn5 near the solder. As the aging time increased, CuZn5 gradually transformed to Cu5Zn8, and the thickness of the CuZn5 layer gradually decreased until CuZn5 disappeared completely. There was a Sn–Zn solid solution at the Al interface, and the composition of the Al interface of the Cu/Al joints did not change with changing temperature. The IMC thickness at the Cu interface of the joints continued to increase, and the shear strength of the Cu/Al joints decreased with increasing aging temperature and time. Compared with the as-received samples, the IMC thickness of the Cu interface of joints increased by 371.8% and the shear strength of the Cu/Al joints was reduced by 83.2% when the joints were aged at 150°C for 24 h. With an increase in aging temperature, the fracture mode of the Cu/Al joints changed from being between solder balls and Zn particles to between Zn particles.

Originality/value

With increasing aging temperature, the shear strengths of the Cu/SACZ/Al joints decreased at the same aging time, the shear strength of Cu/SACZ/Al joints at 150°C for 24h decreased by 83.2% compared with that of the as-received joints.

Details

Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 March 2021

Kei Ouchi, Shalender Bhasin and Ariela R. Orkaby

Individuals over age 65 represent the fastest-growing segment of the population, yet they are also the least studied group and are most likely to be excluded from research…

Abstract

Purpose

Individuals over age 65 represent the fastest-growing segment of the population, yet they are also the least studied group and are most likely to be excluded from research most likely to apply to them. A significant reason for this deficit has been a dearth of scientists and clinicians to care for and study the many diseases that impact older adults. The purpose of this manuscript is to help early-stage clinician-scientists develop local forums fostering their career developments.

Design/methodology/approach

In this manuscript, the difficulties associated with raising new generations of researchers in aging and offer suggestions for how early-stage clinician-scientists can foster career development in aging are discussed. This paper draws upon a local example, ARIES, to explain how early-stage investigators can be brought together with the goal of creating a pipeline of future leaders in aging research.

Findings

The model may empower more early-stage clinicians to successfully pursue aging research.

Originality/value

The current success of aging researchers in the early stages serves as a model for creating similar career development programs designed for early-stage researchers in aging.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2022

Melanie Levasseur, Daniel Naud, Nancy Presse, Nathalie Delli-Colli, Patrick Boissy, Benoît Cossette, Yves Couturier and Julien Cadieux Genesse

This conceptual paper aims to describe aging all over the place (AAOP), a federative framework for action, research and policy that considers older adults’ diverse…

Abstract

Purpose

This conceptual paper aims to describe aging all over the place (AAOP), a federative framework for action, research and policy that considers older adults’ diverse experiences of place and life trajectories, along with person-centered care.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework was developed through group discussions, followed by an appraisal of aging models and validation during workshops with experts, including older adults.

Findings

Every residential setting and location where older adults go should be considered a “place,” flexible and adaptable enough so that aging in place becomes aging all over the place. Health-care professionals, policymakers and researchers are encouraged to collaborate around four axes: biopsychosocial health and empowerment; welcoming, caring, mobilized and supportive community; spatiotemporal life and care trajectories; and out-of-home care and services. When consulted, a Seniors Committee showed appreciation for flexible person-centered care, recognition of life transitions and care trajectories and meaningfulness of the name.

Social implications

Population aging and the pandemic call for intersectoral actions and for stakeholders beyond health care to act as community leaders. AAOP provides opportunities to connect environmental determinants of health and person-centered care.

Originality/value

Building on the introduction of an ecological experience of aging, AAOP broadens the concept of care as well as the political and research agenda by greater integration of community and clinical actions. AAOP also endeavors to avoid patronizing older adults and to engage society in strengthening circles of benevolence surrounding older adults, regardless of their residential setting. AAOP’s applicability is evidenced by existing projects that share its approach.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 September 2022

Rowaida Yawar, Soulat Khan, Maryam Rafiq, Nimra Fawad, Sundas Shams, Saher Navid, Muhammad Abdullah Khan, Nabiha Taufiq, Areesha Touqir, Moazma Imran and Tayyab Ali Butt

This study aims to examine the relationship between aging anxiety, self-esteem, physical symptomology and quality of life in early and middle adults as well as to explore…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationship between aging anxiety, self-esteem, physical symptomology and quality of life in early and middle adults as well as to explore the mediating role of self-esteem.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional study was designed, and a sample of N= 700 educated men and women aged between 35 and 65 years were taken through purposive sampling. Anxiety about Aging Scale, Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, The World Health Organization Quality of Life – BREF and Somatic Symptom Scale-8 were used for assessment.

Findings

Research suggests that an increase in aging anxiety leads to poor quality of life and lower self-esteem. Additionally, a negative relationship was observed between aging anxiety and physical symptomology. Self-esteem plays a mediating role significantly in these relationships.

Practical implications

The study highlighted the adverse effects of aging anxiety on the basis of which strategies can be devised to cope with it as well as to improve the self-esteem and quality of life in transition age. These findings can also aid in providing health care and public services in later adulthood. This study also emphasizes on aging as a human right rather than merely a process such as the human right for physical health and mental health.

Originality/value

This study provides a new outlook and perspective toward how the phenomenon of aging impacts the lives of adults who are about to enter older adulthood in a few years. The fears related to aging influence physical and mental health, due to which it is necessary to investigate the effect of aging anxiety.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

Abstract

Details

When Reproduction Meets Ageing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-747-8

Book part
Publication date: 7 November 2017

Florian Kohlbacher, Izabela Warwas and Hendrik Mollenhauer

This chapter discusses the concept of productive ageing in Japan and Poland. Productive ageing is defined as any activity by older people which produces goods or services…

Abstract

This chapter discusses the concept of productive ageing in Japan and Poland. Productive ageing is defined as any activity by older people which produces goods or services, whether paid or not. Productive ageing is slightly more narrowly defined than active ageing in so far it is focused on economic activity whereas active ageing covers a broader array of social activities. The chapter discusses activities of governments and employers in these three economies in promoting economic activities. The relative success of the Japanese economy in sustaining relative high levels of older employment is the result of active government interventions both in terms of adjusting pension policies to support working pensioners and intervening in employer practices. In Poland, government has struggled to raise older workers’ participation rates by raising pension ages and promoting older employment. In both countries, governments are recognising the economic impact of ageing demographics on the respective societies, but have had different levels of active involvement in intervening in employer practices. Finally, this chapter initiates a broader discussion of the situation in the discussed area not only in Poland, but in other countries of Central and Eastern Europe.

Details

Managing the Ageing Workforce in the East and the West
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-639-6

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 18 January 2013

Suchit Arora

The Epidemiologic Transition can help us understand a fundamental puzzle about aging. The puzzle stems from two seemingly contradictory facts. The first fact is that death…

Abstract

The Epidemiologic Transition can help us understand a fundamental puzzle about aging. The puzzle stems from two seemingly contradictory facts. The first fact is that death rates from noninfectious degenerative maladies – the so-called diseases of aging – increase as people age. It seems to be at odds with the historical fact that for nearly a century in which people were aging more than ever before, the aggregate rates of such diseases have been decreasing. In what sense can both be true? Crucial to resolving the puzzle are the age-profiles of such diseases in cohorts that grew up in the different regimes of the Transition. For each cohort, noninfectious diseases had increased with age, resulting in an upward-sloping age profile, which affirms the first fact. As the regimes were transitioning from the Malthusian to the modern one, however, the profiles of successive cohorts had been shifting downward: death rates from noninfectious diseases were shrinking at each age, signifying the newer cohorts’ greater aging potentials. The shifting profiles had been renewing the cohort mix of the population, shaping the century-long descent of such diseases in aggregate, giving rise to the historical fact. The profiles had shifted early in the cohorts’ adult years, associating closely with the newer epidemiologic conditions in childhood. Those conditions appear to be a circumstance under which aging potentials of cohorts could be misgauged, including in one troubling episode in the first half of the nineteenth century when the potentials had reversed.

Details

Research in Economic History
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-557-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 August 2022

Guisheng Gan, Shiqi Chen, Liujie Jiang, Zhaoqi Jiang, Cong Liu, Peng Ma, Dayong Cheng and Xin Liu

This study aims to evaluate the effect of thermal aging temperature on the properties of Cu/Cu joints.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate the effect of thermal aging temperature on the properties of Cu/Cu joints.

Design/methodology/approach

A new method that 1 um Zn-particles and Sn-0.3Ag-0.7Cu (SAC0307) with a particle size of 25–38 µm were mixed to fill the joint and successfully achieved the micro-joining of Cu/Cu under ultrasonic-assisted at low-temperature, and then the effect of thermal aging temperature on the properties of Cu/Cu joints was researched.

Findings

The composition of the intermetallic compounds (IMCs) on the upper and lower interfaces of Cu/SACZ/Cu joints remained unchanged, which was Cu5Zn8 in aging process, and the thickness of the IMCs on the upper and lower interfaces of the Cu/SACZ/Cu joints increased accordingly. Compared with the as-received joints, the thickness of the upper and lower interfaces IMCs of the soldering aged time for 24 h increased by 404.7% and 505.5% at 150ºC, respectively. The IMCs formation tendency and the IMCs growth rate of the lower interface are larger than those of the upper interface because the soldering seam near the IMCs at the upper and lower interfaces of the as-received joints were mostly white SAC0307 balls black Zn-particles, respectively. The growth activation energy of IMCs in the upper and lower interfaces is about 89.21 and 55.11 kJ/mol, respectively. Under the same aging time, with the increase of the aging temperature, the shear strength of Cu/SACZ/Cu joints did not change significantly at first before 150ºC. When the aging temperature reached 150ºC, the shear strength of the joints decreased significantly; the shear strength of the joints was the smallest at 150ºC for 24 h, which was 39.4% lower than that of the as-received joints because the oxidation degree of Zn particles in the joint with the increase of aging temperature and time.

Originality/value

Cu/Cu joints were successfully achieved under ultrasonic-assisted at low-temperature.

Details

Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

C.M. Lawrence Wu and M.L. Chau

This paper presents a reliability assessment of adhesive joints using chip‐on‐glass (COG) technology which was conducted by testing samples at various aging temperatures…

Abstract

This paper presents a reliability assessment of adhesive joints using chip‐on‐glass (COG) technology which was conducted by testing samples at various aging temperatures and at high humidity.The range of aging temperatures took into account the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the adhesive films. The effects of high temperature and high humidity on the bond strength of flip‐chip‐on‐glass joints were evaluated by shear testing as well as by microstructural examination.It was found that aging generally caused a decrease in shear strength while the aging temperature was below the glass transition temperature of ACF. When the aging temperature was slightly above the Tg of the ACF, a significant decrease in shear strength was observed. Moreover, results from scanning electronic microscopy revealed the presence of some voids near the component bumps, resulting in high stresses at the high aging temperature. DSC results showed that the ACF was not fully cured, allowing moisture absorption more seriously than a fully cured ACF, leading to joint degradation.

Details

Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

Keywords

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