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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2019

Debora Jeske, Annalisa Setti and Daisy Beth Gibbons

It is well-known that stereotypes on aging and perceptions about the suitability of certain jobs for certain age groups can influence performance ratings. However, it is…

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Abstract

Purpose

It is well-known that stereotypes on aging and perceptions about the suitability of certain jobs for certain age groups can influence performance ratings. However, it is unclear whether and how subjective views on aging are associated with judgment on someone else’s performance. The purpose of this study is to explore the role of aging perceptions and images of aging on performance ratings for a fictitious set of male candidates with different age and job profiles. Ratings of interest were job suitability, developmental potential, interpersonal skills and performance capacity.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an online survey format, data was collected from 203 Irish and UK employees to assess how they evaluated different fictitious candidates for a local development committee. The age and mentorship status of the candidates were also manipulated.

Findings

The age or mentoring status of the candidate did not play a significant role in how they were rated. Multiple regression analyses indicated, however, that participants’ aging perceptions and aging images had a significantly positive influence on how they rated the fictitious candidates (after controlling for participant variables such as age and experience). However, positive images of aging and aging perceptions on the part of the participants predicted more positive overall job suitability ratings, developmental potential, interpersonal skills and performance capacity. When the participants had more negative views on aging, they would also allocate lower ratings.

Originality/value

The results indicate that employee attitudes about aging play a role in how they will rate others. Given the importance of potential rating bias, the authors propose a number of training interventions that human resource professionals may be able to carry out to positively shape the informational basis for more negative aging attitudes.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2021

Kei Ouchi, Shalender Bhasin and Ariela R. Orkaby

Individuals over age 65 represent the fastest-growing segment of the population, yet they are also the least studied group and are most likely to be excluded from research…

Abstract

Purpose

Individuals over age 65 represent the fastest-growing segment of the population, yet they are also the least studied group and are most likely to be excluded from research most likely to apply to them. A significant reason for this deficit has been a dearth of scientists and clinicians to care for and study the many diseases that impact older adults. The purpose of this manuscript is to help early-stage clinician-scientists develop local forums fostering their career developments.

Design/methodology/approach

In this manuscript, the difficulties associated with raising new generations of researchers in aging and offer suggestions for how early-stage clinician-scientists can foster career development in aging are discussed. This paper draws upon a local example, ARIES, to explain how early-stage investigators can be brought together with the goal of creating a pipeline of future leaders in aging research.

Findings

The model may empower more early-stage clinicians to successfully pursue aging research.

Originality/value

The current success of aging researchers in the early stages serves as a model for creating similar career development programs designed for early-stage researchers in aging.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2021

Haitao Zhang, Junfeng Sun and Mingyang Gong

The purpose of this study is to compare and analyze the anti-aging durability of asphalt and asphalt mixture under the conditions of inherent and improved performance. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to compare and analyze the anti-aging durability of asphalt and asphalt mixture under the conditions of inherent and improved performance. The research contents include: the mechanical properties (dynamic stability, bending strain, freeze-thaw splitting tensile strength ratio (TSR)) of different modified asphalt mixtures were tested by using the best modified asphalt.

Design/methodology/approach

The anti-aging durability of different modified asphalt was analyzed by using the results of macro tests such as penetration and softening point as evaluation indexes. Meanwhile, the change of the asphalt colloid instability index (Ic) in the aging process was used as the evaluation index to verify the results of the macroscopic test, and the best modified asphalt was obtained. On this basis, the composition of different modified asphalt mixtures was designed by using the best modified asphalt. Meanwhile, water stability was used as evaluation indexes to study the anti-aging durability of different modified asphalt mixtures.

Findings

The results show that styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) modified asphalt has better aging resistance. Due to the special storage time, the performance of rubber asphalt is also the best. Meanwhile, in terms of modified asphalt mixture, its high temperature performance and durability of anti-aging is as follows: 4% SBS /16% rubber modified asphalt mixture (IV) > 4% SBS modified asphalt mixture (II) > asphalt mixture (90#) (I) > 16% rubber modified asphalt mixture (III). The low temperature performance and durability of anti-aging is as follows: Ⅱ > IV > Ⅰ > Ⅲ. The water stability performance and durability of anti-aging is as follows: IV > Ⅲ > Ⅱ > Ⅰ.

Originality/value

The research results have important theoretical and guiding significance for exploring the change of intrinsic properties and improved properties of asphalt and asphalt mixture in the aging process and revealing the anti-aging mechanism of different modified asphalt mixtures.

Details

Multidiscipline Modeling in Materials and Structures, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1573-6105

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Article
Publication date: 9 June 2021

Chaturong Napathorn

This paper examines the human resource (HR) strategies and practices that are considered to be particularly beneficial for aging employees in organizations in Thailand…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the human resource (HR) strategies and practices that are considered to be particularly beneficial for aging employees in organizations in Thailand, which is an underresearched developing economy, from an employee perspective and the implications of national institutions and cultures for the adoption and implementation of those HR strategies and practices across organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The results of the study, based on a cross-case analysis of seven organizations across industries, are primarily drawn from structured interviews and focus groups with aging employees, field visits and a review of archival documents and web-based resources, including newspaper reports and magazines.

Findings

This paper proposes that HR strategies that are appropriate for managing aging employees in organizations in Thailand’s developing economy can be classified into four bundles: growth, maintenance, recovery and regulation. Each bundle of HR strategies consists of several HR practices that are appropriate for managing aging employees in organizations. In particular, from the perspective of aging employees, these HR practices help aging employees upgrade their skills, prepare them to have a sufficient amount of financial savings after retirement, ensure that they are safe, secure and healthy, help them feel that their tacit knowledge and experience are still valuable, and help them perform jobs that are appropriate for their physical health conditions. Additionally, the adoption and implementation of the proposed HR strategies and practices tend to be influenced by national institutions in terms of deficiencies in the national skill formation system, healthcare institutions, regulatory institutions and welfare state regime and by the national culture in terms of reciprocity and respect for elderly people (i.e. aging employees). However, there are five important HR practices that are specifically appropriate for managing aging employees in Thailand and other developing economies where the level of household debt and/or personal debt is high, where the increasing number of aging employees leads to high demand for medical services when the medical services offered by private hospitals are expensive, and where tacit knowledge and experience are important for creating and maintaining firms’ competitive advantage: (1) the facilitation of financial planning, (2) safety and health training, (3) annual health check-ups, (4) the appointment of aging employees as advisors/mentors and (5) knowledge transfer/job enrichment.

Research limitations/implications

One of the limitations of this research is its methodology. Because this research is based on case studies of seven firms located in Thailand, the findings may not be generalizable to all other firms across countries. Rather, the aim of this paper is to further the discussion regarding HR strategies and practices for managing aging employees in organizations. Another limitation of this research is that it does not include firms located in several other industries, including the agricultural and fishery industry and the financial services industry. Future research may explore HR strategies and practices for managing aging employees in organizations located in these industries. Moreover, quantitative studies using large samples of aging employees who work in firms across industries might also be useful in deepening the understanding of HR strategies and practices for managing aging/retired employees in organizations.

Practical implications

This paper provides practical implications for top managers and/or HR managers of firms in Thailand and other developing economies where the level of household debt and/or personal debt is high, where the increasing number of aging employees leads to high demand for medical services when the medical services offered by private hospitals are expensive, and where tacit knowledge and experience are important for creating and maintaining firms’ competitive advantage. In particular, the aging employees in this study identified the HR practices that they perceive as being appropriate for aging employees and that were already available in firms or that they expect their firms to have but are currently missing. In this regard, HR managers should take note of these good and appropriate HR practices to ensure that they become part of official, structured HR strategies and practices. This would ultimately help line managers and aging employees think more positively about the future of aging employees within the company and help retain invaluable aging employees over time.

Social implications

This paper provides social/policy implications for the government and/or relevant public agencies of Thailand and several other developing economies where the majority of aging people do not have sufficient savings to support themselves after retirement, especially when these countries are becoming aging societies, where the increasing demand for medical services cannot be adequately addressed by existing public hospitals while private hospitals’ medical prices are quite expensive, and where intellectual property right (IPR) protection laws are weak. That said, such governments should encourage firms located in their countries to implement these HR strategies and practices for developing, maintaining, deploying and supporting aging employees.

Originality/value

This paper aims to contribute to the literature on human resource management (HRM), specifically on HR practices for aging employees, in the following ways. First, this study is different from the previous studies in that it examines HR practices for managing aging employees from an employee perspective, while most of the previous studies in this area have focused on the management of such employees from an employer perspective. In this case, it is possible that formal company policies may be different from actual HR practices as perceived by aging employees (Khilji and Wang, 2006). Second, this paper explores the implications of national institutions and cultures of Thailand’s developing economy for the adoption and implementation of HR strategies and practices that are appropriate for managing aging employees in organizations. Finally, this paper examines HR practices that are specifically appropriate for managing aging employees in Thailand and other developing economies. The literature on HR practices for aging employees has overlooked developing economies, including the underresearched country of Thailand, as most of the studies in this area have focused on developed economies. In fact, developed economies and developing economies are very different in several respects, which may influence the HR strategies and practices that are appropriate for managing aging employees in organizations.

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International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

C.M. Lawrence Wu and M.L. Chau

This paper presents a reliability assessment of adhesive joints using chip‐on‐glass (COG) technology which was conducted by testing samples at various aging temperatures…

Abstract

This paper presents a reliability assessment of adhesive joints using chip‐on‐glass (COG) technology which was conducted by testing samples at various aging temperatures and at high humidity.The range of aging temperatures took into account the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the adhesive films. The effects of high temperature and high humidity on the bond strength of flip‐chip‐on‐glass joints were evaluated by shear testing as well as by microstructural examination.It was found that aging generally caused a decrease in shear strength while the aging temperature was below the glass transition temperature of ACF. When the aging temperature was slightly above the Tg of the ACF, a significant decrease in shear strength was observed. Moreover, results from scanning electronic microscopy revealed the presence of some voids near the component bumps, resulting in high stresses at the high aging temperature. DSC results showed that the ACF was not fully cured, allowing moisture absorption more seriously than a fully cured ACF, leading to joint degradation.

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Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Richard C. Leventhal

Considers the “baby boom” generation, and that all ofthem will be the new aging market starting in the 1990s. Argues thatwhen marketers are considering aging consumers…

Abstract

Considers the “baby boom” generation, and that all of them will be the new aging market starting in the 1990s. Argues that when marketers are considering aging consumers, there are three demographic issues that must be considered prior to the creation to any strategy: (1) stereotypes concerning the aging consumer must be done away with, (2) the aging consumer is not an isolated entity, and (3) from a psychographic and numbers standpoint, the aging consumer market of tomorrow is going to much different from the aging consumer market of today.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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When Reproduction Meets Ageing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-747-8

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Book part
Publication date: 7 November 2017

Florian Kohlbacher, Izabela Warwas and Hendrik Mollenhauer

This chapter discusses the concept of productive ageing in Japan and Poland. Productive ageing is defined as any activity by older people which produces goods or services…

Abstract

This chapter discusses the concept of productive ageing in Japan and Poland. Productive ageing is defined as any activity by older people which produces goods or services, whether paid or not. Productive ageing is slightly more narrowly defined than active ageing in so far it is focused on economic activity whereas active ageing covers a broader array of social activities. The chapter discusses activities of governments and employers in these three economies in promoting economic activities. The relative success of the Japanese economy in sustaining relative high levels of older employment is the result of active government interventions both in terms of adjusting pension policies to support working pensioners and intervening in employer practices. In Poland, government has struggled to raise older workers’ participation rates by raising pension ages and promoting older employment. In both countries, governments are recognising the economic impact of ageing demographics on the respective societies, but have had different levels of active involvement in intervening in employer practices. Finally, this chapter initiates a broader discussion of the situation in the discussed area not only in Poland, but in other countries of Central and Eastern Europe.

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Managing the Ageing Workforce in the East and the West
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-639-6

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Book part
Publication date: 18 January 2013

Suchit Arora

The Epidemiologic Transition can help us understand a fundamental puzzle about aging. The puzzle stems from two seemingly contradictory facts. The first fact is that death…

Abstract

The Epidemiologic Transition can help us understand a fundamental puzzle about aging. The puzzle stems from two seemingly contradictory facts. The first fact is that death rates from noninfectious degenerative maladies – the so-called diseases of aging – increase as people age. It seems to be at odds with the historical fact that for nearly a century in which people were aging more than ever before, the aggregate rates of such diseases have been decreasing. In what sense can both be true? Crucial to resolving the puzzle are the age-profiles of such diseases in cohorts that grew up in the different regimes of the Transition. For each cohort, noninfectious diseases had increased with age, resulting in an upward-sloping age profile, which affirms the first fact. As the regimes were transitioning from the Malthusian to the modern one, however, the profiles of successive cohorts had been shifting downward: death rates from noninfectious diseases were shrinking at each age, signifying the newer cohorts’ greater aging potentials. The shifting profiles had been renewing the cohort mix of the population, shaping the century-long descent of such diseases in aggregate, giving rise to the historical fact. The profiles had shifted early in the cohorts’ adult years, associating closely with the newer epidemiologic conditions in childhood. Those conditions appear to be a circumstance under which aging potentials of cohorts could be misgauged, including in one troubling episode in the first half of the nineteenth century when the potentials had reversed.

Details

Research in Economic History
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-557-9

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Abstract

Details

The Aging Workforce Handbook
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-448-8

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