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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2007

Angela M. Young and David Hurlic

This paper seeks to explore gender‐related behavior in relation to person‐group fit, person‐organization fit, and career decisions in order to identify relevant constructs…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to explore gender‐related behavior in relation to person‐group fit, person‐organization fit, and career decisions in order to identify relevant constructs and relationships and present suggestions for further research.

Design/methodology/approach

A model was developed based on a review of several literature bases including gender theories, gender enactment, person‐group fit, and person‐organization fit.

Findings

Propositions for future research were developed and focus on the relationships influencing an individual's perceptions of person‐group fit, person‐organization fit and career decision making. It is proposed that a deviation from a group's collective gender orientation and accepted behaviors is likely to be met with unfavorable perceptions by group members and impact person‐group fit, person‐organization fit, perceived stress, self‐efficacy, and career decision making.

Practical implications

Managers and supervisors can use ideas presented in the model and paper to better understand nuances of gender‐related behavior and its potential impact on behavior and perceptions in the workgroup and organization. Diversity managers and training professionals could incorporate aspects of gender‐related differences into training programs, and individuals might use some ideas presented in this paper to consider the important implications of person‐group and person‐organization fit to career success.

Originality/value

The model developed in this paper is a unique perspective combining historical perspectives on gender and gender‐related behavior and workplace concepts such as person‐group and person‐organization fit to identify the potential impact of gender‐related differences at work.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2019

Tuan Trong Luu

Mechanisms behind employees’ pro-environmental behaviors have increasingly been attracting scholarly attention. The purpose of this study is to examine how environmentally…

Abstract

Purpose

Mechanisms behind employees’ pro-environmental behaviors have increasingly been attracting scholarly attention. The purpose of this study is to examine how environmentally specific servant leadership contributes to employees’ organizational citizenship behavior for the environment (employee OCBE).

Design/methodology/approach

In this research, employees from resort hotels in Central Vietnam were selected as participants. The data analysis was conducted through structural equation modeling and bootstrapping test.

Findings

Environmentally specific servant leadership exhibited the positive association with employee OCBE through employee environmental engagement as a mediator. Two moderation mechanisms – organizational support for green behaviors and person-group fit – were also found to serve as enhancers for the effect of environmentally specific servant leadership on employee OCBE.

Practical implications

The research results provide hospitality organizations with a premise for the focus of servant leadership and organizational support around pro-environmental values. It is also vital for practitioners to build the fit between employees and the organization’s pro-environmental values so as to further promote their positive reaction to environmentally specific servant leadership and engagement in pro-environmental behaviors.

Originality/value

The present study marks the confluence between environmentally specific servant leadership and employee OCBE research streams and provides a moderated mediation mechanism to shed light on such a relationship.

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Book part
Publication date: 17 September 2014

Hannes Zacher, Daniel C. Feldman and Heiko Schulz

We develop a conceptual model, based on person-environment fit theory, which explains how employee age affects occupational strain and well-being. We begin by explaining…

Abstract

We develop a conceptual model, based on person-environment fit theory, which explains how employee age affects occupational strain and well-being. We begin by explaining how age directly affects different dimensions of objective and subjective P-E fit. Next, we illustrate how age can moderate the relationship between objective P-E fit and subjective P-E fit. Third, we discuss how age can moderate the relationships between P-E fit, on one hand, and occupational strain and well-being on the other. Fourth, we explain how age can impact occupational strain and well-being directly independent of P-E fit. The chapter concludes with implications for future research and practice.

Details

The Role of Demographics in Occupational Stress and Well Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-646-0

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 October 2020

Andrée-Anne Deschênes

Through three dimensions of person–environment (PE) fit, namely person–job (PJ) fit, person–group (PG) fit and person–supervisor (PS) fit, this paper examines generational…

Abstract

Purpose

Through three dimensions of person–environment (PE) fit, namely person–job (PJ) fit, person–group (PG) fit and person–supervisor (PS) fit, this paper examines generational differences on which dimension is more important to explain Baby Boomers', Generation X's and Generation Y's satisfaction with work.

Design/methodology/approach

Gathered from a sample of 1,065 employees in the province of Québec, Canada, data were analyzed through one-way ANOVA and structural equation modeling.

Findings

The findings suggest that Generation X scored lower on satisfaction with work, that there is a difference in the level of PG fit and PS fit between the generations, and that PJ fit explains satisfaction with work for all generations, while PG fit is significant only for Generation Y employees.

Practical implications

This paper sheds light on the importance for practitioners, when implementing human resource (HR) policies and strategies aiming to increase satisfaction with work, of prioritizing PJ fit and to consider PG fit for Generation Y members.

Originality/value

This research provides a meaningful contribution to current knowledge on generational diversity in the workplace and its impact on managerial practices by examining different levels of satisfaction with work and of PJ, PG and PS fit for three generations and the importance of each type of fit in explaining satisfaction with work for theses generations.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2012

Jee Young Seong and Amy L. Kristof‐Brown

This study seeks to investigate the multidimensionality person‐group (PG) fit. It first aims to examine values‐based, personality‐based, and KSA‐based fit as distinct PG…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to investigate the multidimensionality person‐group (PG) fit. It first aims to examine values‐based, personality‐based, and KSA‐based fit as distinct PG fit dimensions. It then also aims to examine fit as an aggregate construct (each dimension combines to form a latent PG fit construct), and as a superordinate construct (an overarching assessment of compatibility drives the individual fit dimensions). It also aims to propose that the distinct dimensions or the overall perception predict commitment to team, employee voice, and knowledge sharing, resulting in a final outcome of employee task performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using longitudinal survey methodology from three different sources (793 employees, their supervisors and the Human Resources department) in a manufacturing firm in Korea. The various models were evaluated using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The distinct dimensions model, in which values‐based fit predicted commitment to the team, personality‐based fit predicted voice behaviors, and KSA‐based fit predicted knowledge sharing, was mostly supported. Each of these intermediary factors predicted supervisors' ratings of individual task performance. Although each dimension had unique impact on the outcomes, results suggested that a superordinate PG construct might be driving the more specific fit assessments. The aggregate model was not supported.

Originality/value

This study is the first to show how different dimensions of PG fit may differentially influence affect and behavior, to predict task performance. It also shows the first evidence for PG fit as a superordinate multidimensional construct. Results provide a basis for new knowledge regarding the multi‐faceted relationship between fit perceptions and outcomes.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

Ahmed Abdalla, Ahmed Elsetouhi, Abdelhakim Negm and Hussein Abdou

The purpose of the paper is to fill gaps in the existing fit and turnover intention (TI) literature by investigating a more comprehensive model, in which TI is proposed to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to fill gaps in the existing fit and turnover intention (TI) literature by investigating a more comprehensive model, in which TI is proposed to be influenced by the interplays of three multidimensional types of fit including, person-organization (P-O) fit, person-group (P-G) fit, and person-job (P-J) fit.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were selected from different specializations within Mansoura University medical centers, where each medical center was represented proportionately within the sample. Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires. Questionnaires were provided to 850 employees who agreed to participate. Of the 850 questionnaires distributed, 385 were valid and complete (n=385). Partial least squares analysis was utilized for the analyses.

Findings

Results showed that P-O fit, P-G fit, and P-J fit were positively related to each other and negatively related to TI. Furthermore, the negative relationship between P-O fit and TI is partially mediated by P-G fit and P-J fit.

Originality/value

The present study simultaneously examines the multidimensional effects of different fit perceptions on TI. In doing so, we identify which of the fit perspectives influence TI more intensely. Moreover, the authors advance current insights by investigating the mediating roles of P-G fit and P-J fit in the relationship between P-O fit and TI.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 47 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2007

Jon Billsberry

This paper seeks to report an empirical test of Schneider's attraction proposition that organizations attract similar types of people.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to report an empirical test of Schneider's attraction proposition that organizations attract similar types of people.

Design/methodology/approach

The person‐people (PP), person‐group (PG) and person‐organization (PO) fit of applicants to eight utility firms were compared with the similar fits of members of a suitable comparison group.

Findings

The results show an effect for person‐vocation (PV) fit but, once this is controlled for, all significant effects disappear. In other words, the PP, PG and PO fits of applicants to the utilities were no different from those in the comparison group once PV fit was controlled for.

Research limitations/implications

These results suggest that applicants choose which organization to apply to based on their desire for a particular type of work rather than their attraction for particular companies, which is contrary to Schneider's attraction proposition. One reason for this might be the nature of graduates who are largely unaware of the organizational environments to which they are applying. Drawing from the interpersonal attraction literature, it is argued that applicants need familiarity, proximity and exposure to the organization for Schneider's attraction proposition to appear.

Practical implications

These results suggest graduates choose vocations over organizations and that, if organizations wish to attract people who share their values, they need to put more effort into their recruitment efforts than those described in this study. The absence of an attraction effect suggests that, when applicants make attraction decisions based on their perceived fit, they may not be supported by an actual congruence.

Originality/value

This study extends previous work by including multiple conceptualizations of fit, by including person‐group and person‐people fits in addition to person‐organization fit.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Seok-young Oh

The purpose of this paper is to identify how three types of socialization tactics – content, context and social tactics – influence fit perceptions, and then how three…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify how three types of socialization tactics – content, context and social tactics – influence fit perceptions, and then how three types of fit perceptions – person–organization (P–O) fit, person–job (P–J) fit and person–group (P–G) fit – mediate the relationship between socialization tactics and positive socialization outcomes: organizational commitment, job satisfaction and intent to quit.

Design/methodology/approach

Responses from participants – 207 Korean youth workers – were subjected to ordinary least squares path analyses with bootstrapping to test the hypotheses.

Findings

First, this study found that socialization tactics promote youth workers’ perceived fit with organization, job, and people. Then, the mediation model showed that content socialization tactics do not influence dependent variables (socialization outcomes) through mediators (fits), while context tactics influence through perceived P–O fit and P–G fit for organizational commitment only, and social tactics through perceived P–O, P–J and P–G fit for organizational commitment, job satisfaction and intent to quit.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study suggest that institutionalized social tactics can serve as a key socialization method for new employees. In addition, youth organizations need to implement jointly formal and collective training programs with follow-up social workplace learning (e.g. mentoring and study circle) to help newcomers share the values of the organization and integrate well into it.

Originality/value

This study contributes for understanding the socialization process of new employees working in educational and social work fields and role of fit perception between socialization tactics and their career successes.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2019

Yi-Hsuan Lee, Chan Hsiao, Hsin-Yi Chan and I-Chen Lee

The purpose of this paper is to answer the question of how brand-specific transformational leadership (TFL) and transactional leadership (TRL) enhance employee-based brand…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to answer the question of how brand-specific transformational leadership (TFL) and transactional leadership (TRL) enhance employee-based brand equity (EBBE) by influencing employees’ perceived brand value congruence (EPBVC).

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed hierarchical linear modeling and chose moderating variables that are primarily related to the working environment: person–job fit (PJF) and person–group fit (PGF). The sample included managers and employees of the largest domestic bank in Taiwan.

Findings

Questionnaires were distributed to banking staff in the service industry. The results imply that both brand-specific TFL and brand-specific TRL require the mediation of PJF and PGF to influence EBBE, which then influences brand equity. Without these mediators, brand-specific TFL and brand-specific TRL have no effects on EBBE.

Originality/value

Compared to the results from other studies, these results imply a unique discovery that both brand-specific TFL and brand-specific TRL require the mediation of PJF and PGF to influence EPBVC, which in turn influences EBBE. Without these mediators, brand-specific TFL and brand-specific TRL do not have any effects.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2020

Katrien Vandevelde, Elfi Baillien and Guy Notelaers

This study tested whether person-job fit (PJ-fit), person-group fit (PG-fit) and person-organization fit (PO-fit) relate to exposure to and enactment of workplace bullying…

Abstract

Purpose

This study tested whether person-job fit (PJ-fit), person-group fit (PG-fit) and person-organization fit (PO-fit) relate to exposure to and enactment of workplace bullying (WB), mediated by strain and conflict.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 1,077 employees were analysed using multiple mediator structural equation modelling (Mplus 8.0).

Findings

PJ-fit, PG-fit and PO-fit all related to WB. PG-fit accounted for most explained variance. PJ-fit, PG-fit and PO-fit related to bullying through strain; only PG-fit also related to bullying through conflict.

Research limitations/implications

PE-fit is valuable to parsimoniously investigate WB's multi-causal nature; and strain and conflict partially explain the associations. Future research may shed more light on the direction of these effects.

Practical implications

So far, scholars assumed that job design prevents WB (work-environment hypothesis). This study revealed that prevention should also focus on the fit between employee and group/organization.

Social implications

WB has high societal costs. The authors introduce a new angle to WB prevention. To counteract WB, practitioners should also look at PJ-fit, PG-fit and PO-fit. This is not only important for recruitment, but also for tenured employees (e.g. because of changes in employees' needs, the job, the group or the organization).

Originality/value

This study was the first to investigate the multi-causal nature of both WB exposure and enactment, by applying the lens of PE-fit, and testing explanatory mechanisms.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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