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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2021

Ping Bao, Zengrui Xiao, Gongmin Bao and Niels Noorderhaven

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between inclusive leadership and employee work engagement by identifying person-job fit as a mediator, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between inclusive leadership and employee work engagement by identifying person-job fit as a mediator, and employee felt responsibility as a moderator.

Design/methodology/approach

Employing a two-wave survey from 261 employees across various industries in China, the study tests hypotheses using hierarchical regression analysis with the PROCESS procedure developed by Hayes.

Findings

The results show that inclusive leadership is positively related to employee work engagement through person-job fit. The results further demonstrate that employees’ felt responsibility moderates the positive direct relationship between inclusive leadership and person-job fit as well as the indirect relationship between inclusive leadership and work engagement via person-job fit.

Research limitations/implications

Although two-wave data were used to test the model, issues of common method bias cannot be excluded because the data were collected from a single source (the employee).

Practical implications

Organizations should promote and develop inclusive leaders in the workplace to enhance employee work engagement, and pay attention to employees' felt responsibility for their work to ensure effectiveness of inclusive leadership.

Originality/value

Integrating social information processing theory and person-environment fit theory, this study enriches the theoretical foundation of inclusive leadership scholarship. This study deepens the understanding of the mechanism underlying the link between inclusive leadership and work engagement, as well as an important boundary condition of this relationship, by examining the mediating role of person-job fit and the moderating role of felt responsibility.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 19 November 2020

Chongrui Liu, Cong Wang and Hongjie Wang

Although a plethora of literature has developed person–job fit theory, how leaders' emotions affect followers' person–job fit has received insufficient attention. Drawing…

Abstract

Purpose

Although a plethora of literature has developed person–job fit theory, how leaders' emotions affect followers' person–job fit has received insufficient attention. Drawing on emotions as social information (EASI) theory, the present research study investigated the impact of leaders' positive emotions on person–job fit and further explained the mediating role of psychological safety and the moderating effect of organizational identification.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 319 Chinese employees nested in 67 teams, and a cross-level design was adopted to examine the research hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicated that individual-level psychological safety played a mediating role in the cross-level relationship between team-directed leaders' positive emotions and individual-level person–job fit. Moreover, the authors found a cross-level moderating effect of team-level organizational identification.

Practical implications

This present research empirically showed that leaders displaying positive emotions in the workplace benefited followers' perceptions of psychological safety, which in turn improved followers' attitudes towards their job in management practice. In addition, organizational identification could positively advance this process.

Originality/value

This study is the first to evaluate the operational mechanism of leaders' emotion on followers' perceived person–job fit in the Chinese context. Person–job fit has primarily been investigated as a driver of employee outcomes in the previous research studies. These studies focussed on whether and how leaders' emotions improve followers' person–job fit.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Lu-Ming Tseng and Tsu-Wei Yu

This paper aims to examine the impact of salespeople’s subjective person-job fit on the salespeople’s intention to quit. Moreover, this study further investigates how the…

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1124

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the impact of salespeople’s subjective person-job fit on the salespeople’s intention to quit. Moreover, this study further investigates how the subjective person

job fit could be influenced by the cooperative learning and support in the organization. Person-job fit is an important issue for salespeople’s career development. However, the antecedents of salespeople’s person-job fit seem to have been under-investigated in the management literature.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey is used as a research instrument, and Taiwan’s full-time life insurance salespeople took part in the investigation. The hypotheses were tested by using partial least squares and structural equation modeling tool (SmartPLS 2.0).

Findings

The results confirmed that poor subjective person-job fit would significantly increase the salespeople’s intention to quit. Yet, the results also suggested that cooperative learning and organizational support are the mechanisms that reduce this problem.

Originality/value

This study provided the initial discussions about the effect of cooperative learning and organizational support on the salespeople’s subjective person-job fit.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2021

Myoung-Soung Lee and Jaewon Yoo

This study investigated the effects of social capital on frontline bank employee's adaptive selling behavior via the psychological process. Frontline bank employees'…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigated the effects of social capital on frontline bank employee's adaptive selling behavior via the psychological process. Frontline bank employees' positive social relationships enhance their perception of the work environment and encourage work engagement. With the multiple mediation model, both internal and external social capital have direct and indirect influence on the frontline bank employee's adaptive selling behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this study were collected from a cross-sectional sample of retail banking industry in Korea. Specifically, using two-step procedures, employees of financial service or insurance sales department in banks were selected and online survey questionnaires were distributed to them. Data from 330 employees were collected and analyzed.

Findings

The results of this study showed how social capital affects frontline bank employees' person–job fit as a cognitive psychological process, leading to work engagement as an emotional psychological process and, in turn, more adaptive selling behavior. Using multiple mediation analysis, the results showed that work engagement on its own exerts a mediating effect on social capital, whereas a person–job fit does not.

Research limitations/implications

This study applied both aspects of the social capital concept by dividing it into internal and external social capital, and exploring each separately. This study examined the influence on psychological processes and behavioral response by distinguishing between the two forms of social capital. Second, this study expands the previous studies by introducing social capital as an antecedent factor of frontline bank employees' adaptive selling behavior. Finally, this study explains how frontline bank employees' relational resources (i.e. social capital) influence their emotional aspect (i.e. work engagement) and cognitive aspect (i.e. person–job fit), which ultimately influence performance-driven behavior (i.e. adaptive selling behavior).

Practical implications

This research showed the importance of hiring frontline bank employees with excellent social capital capabilities. Furthermore, this study underscored the fact that organizations require preparing and providing practical management methods that can improve the social capital of their current frontline employees. Last, organization need to design the job in a way that innately improves frontline employees' social capital. Therefore, these jobs provide many opportunities for frontline bank employees to use their ability to build relationships in their interactions with customers and make practical decisions to achieve job performance.

Originality/value

This study improved our understanding regarding the importance of employees' social capital by revealing the psychological process of how frontline bank employees' social capital affects adaptive selling behavior. Second, this study expands on the literature by introducing internal and external social capital as an antecedent factor affecting the adaptive selling behavior of frontline bank employees. Furthermore, this study advances understanding on the manner in which relational resources of frontline bank employees (i.e. social capital) influence the emotional (i.e. work engagement) as well as the cognitive aspects (i.e. person–job fit), which ultimately influence performance-driven behavior (i.e. adaptive selling behavior).

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 18 August 2020

Ilona Toth, Sanna Heinänen and Kirsimarja Blomqvist

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of virtual community trust on work engagement and person–job fit in the context of digital work platforms. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of virtual community trust on work engagement and person–job fit in the context of digital work platforms. The emergence of the platform economy is changing the work environment fundamentally. It has enabled the appearance of alternative work arrangements, such as temporary organizing and the increase of independent contracting, also among highly specialized knowledge workers.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected with an online survey and used to test the relationships between virtual community trust, work engagement and person–job fit. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling were used to test the goodness of a theoretical model.

Findings

Based on the data of 127 experts contracting on digital work platforms, virtual community trust positively affects both work engagement and person–job fit. In addition, the relationship between work engagement and person–job fit in the context of digital work platforms is significant and positive.

Practical implications

This study shows that trust among independent contractors working on digital platforms is important for work engagement and that platform providers can improve work performance through person–job fit by assisting in the creation of trust among members of their platforms.

Originality/value

The research literature on knowledge work in the changing context of work is scarce, and the role of trust in the context of digital work platforms needs clarification. This paper tests a theoretical model on the effects of trust among highly skilled experts working in the digital platform context as independent contractors and provides evidence for the importance of building trust among members of a virtual work community.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2017

Hong T.M. Bui, Yolanda Zeng and Malcolm Higgs

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between transformational leadership and employees’ work engagement based on fit theory. The paper reports an…

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3345

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between transformational leadership and employees’ work engagement based on fit theory. The paper reports an investigation into the way in which employees’ perceptions of transformational leadership and person-job fit affect their work engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the authors’ hypotheses, the authors performed structure equation modeling with maximum likelihood estimation on Mplus with bootstrapping proposed by Hayes (2009) with data from 691 full-time employees in China.

Findings

The results indicate that transformational leadership has as significant influence on employees’ work engagement as person-job fit in China. Moreover, employees’ perception of person-job fit is found to partially mediate the relationship between transformational leadership and employees’ work engagement.

Research limitations/implications

There is a possible bias arising from the use of cross-sectional data. However, certain methods were implemented to minimize it, including survey design and data analysis.

Practical implications

The paper proposes a number of practical implications for policy makers, HR managers and transformational leaders relating to issues associated with improving levels of employee engagement.

Originality/value

The study contributes to developing leadership and engagement theory by examining a previously unexplored mediator – person-job fit – in a neglected cultural setting. This study promises to open new research avenues in this area.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Nwamaka A. Anaza

The purpose of this paper is to examine a model of employee-customer identification (ECID) using two samples: nurses and cooperative extension frontline employees. The…

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1238

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine a model of employee-customer identification (ECID) using two samples: nurses and cooperative extension frontline employees. The model posits that person-organization fit, person-job fit, and organizational identification are positively related to ECID.

Design/methodology/approach

A recursive path-based structural model was employed to test seven hypotheses regarding the relationships between the two fit constructs, organizational identification, and ECID.

Findings

In both samples, person-organization fit and person-job fit were positively related to organizational identification, and organizational identification was positively related to ECID. In the cooperative extension sample, person-job fit was positively related to ECID. Person-job fit was also indirectly related to ECID through organizational identification in both samples.

Research limitations/implications

The results imply an important relationship between person-job fit and ECID that could be useful for improving service encounters between employees and customers. In addition, an emphasis on organizational identification may also contribute to improved employee-customer relationships.

Originality/value

This study represents one of the first attempts to demonstrate a link between person-job and person-organization fit on ECID. The results of this study provide support for organizational identification and person-job fit as important factors in employee-customer relationships.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Osman M. Karatepe and Georgiana Karadas

Using person–job fit, congruence and conservation of resources theories as the theoretical underpinnings, the purpose of this study is to propose and test a research model…

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2804

Abstract

Purpose

Using person–job fit, congruence and conservation of resources theories as the theoretical underpinnings, the purpose of this study is to propose and test a research model that investigates work-family conflict and family–work conflict as mediators of the impact of person–job fit on work engagement. The model also examines the mediating role of work engagement in the relationship between conflicts in the work–family interface and life satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Data gathered from frontline hotel employees two weeks apart in three waves in Romania were utilized to assess the abovementioned relationships via structural equation modeling.

Findings

Two directions of conflict act as partial mediators between person–job fit and work engagement. Work engagement fully mediates the relationship between work–family conflict and life satisfaction, while it functions as a partial mediator of the effect of family–work conflict on life satisfaction.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to current knowledge by investigating the interrelationships of person–job fit, two directions of conflict, work engagement and life satisfaction.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Mert Aktaş

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating influence of idiocentrism and allocentrism on person-organization fit, person-job fit and work attitudes relationship.

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1672

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating influence of idiocentrism and allocentrism on person-organization fit, person-job fit and work attitudes relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey data were collected from 426 employees of a holding company.

Findings

The results reveal that allocentrism makes a difference in fitting the particular aspect of work environment for the individual. Results showed that allocentrism positively moderates person-organization fit and job satisfaction and organizational commitment and turnover relationship. However, no moderating influence of idiocentrism was found on person-organization fit and employee attitude relationship. Furthermore, it was also found that neither idiocentrism nor allocentrism moderated the relationship between the person-job fit and employee attitudes relationship.

Originality/value

This research adds a cultural component to the person-environment fit research.

Details

Cross Cultural Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Oliver Neumann

In light of the challenge to attract skilled employees in times of dwindling labour supply, the purpose of this paper is to investigate how motivational person-job fit

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1955

Abstract

Purpose

In light of the challenge to attract skilled employees in times of dwindling labour supply, the purpose of this paper is to investigate how motivational person-job fit influences the preference for a job. Using a model based on prospect theory, person-job fit is operationalised on three motivational dimensions: extrinsic, enjoyment-based intrinsic, and prosocial intrinsic motivation. Public service motivation (PSM) is theoretically integrated into the model’s dimensions and conceptualised as a fuzzy subset thereof. Within the model, job seekers evaluate their fit with various jobs by comparing their personal motives to the jobs’ motivational incentives, compiling a preference order.

Design/methodology/approach

The model was tested using a completely randomised vignette experiment. In all, 102 master’s students had to indicate their preference among various randomly selected job vignettes. Certain vignettes presented to experimental group (EG) subjects were individually manipulated to provide either very good or very poor person-job fit. The manipulation’s effect on vignette preference was analysed using logistic regression.

Findings

EG subjects significantly preferred both well-fitting and random vignettes over misfitting ones. No significant preference was found comparing well-fitting and random vignettes. Coherent with prospect theory, the deterring effect of misfit appears to be stronger than the attraction effect of good fit, supporting the model.

Originality/value

Most previous research on motivational person-job fit focused on a single factor (e.g. PSM) when predicting job preference. This study, in contrast, incorporates multiple motivational dimensions, capturing that individuals usually pursue mixed motives.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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