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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2019

Oluseyi Moses Ajayi, Wayne Martindale and Mark Swainson

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, it aims to investigate how salt and sugar reduction in foods due to the pressure from the emerging food regulations will…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, it aims to investigate how salt and sugar reduction in foods due to the pressure from the emerging food regulations will affect the physico-electrical properties (PEPs) of orange juice and tomatoes during a selected PEP-dependent thermal processing. Second, the authors are keen to understand how variations in salt and sugar ingredients will affect the time-temperature processing requirements.

Design/methodology/approach

PEPs of the samples (orange juice and tomatoes) were measured using the KD2 thermal analyser and RS conductivity metre. Both samples with varying salt and sugar levels were subjected to ohmic heating processing using a 10 kW ohmic heater. Dehydration rates and processing times for pasteurisation were obtained.

Findings

Electrical conductivity increases with added salt in tomato puree but decreases with added sugar in orange juice. Statistical evidence confirmed significant changes in heating rates and processing times of tomatoes and orange juice as their relevant salt and sugar levels change. Reduction in salt content in tomato puree led to increase in time and energy for the thermal processes. While reduction in added sugar in orange juice results led to reduction in processing time and energy requirement for the processing operation.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to small change in salt and sugar variations in order to reflect recommended limits. There were therefore no significant changes in thermal conductivity for the range investigated. Also this study is focussed on two food products.

Practical implications

Current pressure on the need to reduce salt and sugar in foods necessitates research to increase food processing industry insight into the process and product impacts of such recipe changes, with particular regard to processing efficiency and product safety and quality.

Originality/value

This study represents an attempt to understand the impact of salt and sugar variations on properties and processing requirements of tomato puree and orange juice.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 January 2021

Marilú Andrea Silva-Espinoza, María del Mar Camacho and Nuria Martínez-Navarrete

A healthy and easy-to-use orange snack obtained from the freeze-dried orange pulp puree is proposed. Once the commercial packaging of the snack has been opened, the effect…

Abstract

Purpose

A healthy and easy-to-use orange snack obtained from the freeze-dried orange pulp puree is proposed. Once the commercial packaging of the snack has been opened, the effect of conventional home storage temperature on its physicochemical properties and on the content of bioactive compounds has been studied. This research aims to recommend the consumer, and therefore the manufacturer, the best conditions for home storage of this product, keeping its nutritional quality and antioxidant capacity, as well as maintaining its colour and crispness.

Design/methodology/approach

The water content, water activity, hygroscopicity, crispness, colour, vitamin C, β-carotene, total phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity were characterised both when the orange snack was newly obtained and after one, two and six months of storage inside zipper bags, at 4 and 20 ºC.

Findings

The results indicated that, in these conditions, the orange snack increased its water content, causing a loss in both its porosity and its characteristic crispness. Nevertheless, the bioactive compounds remained stable throughout the storage period, with the exception of β-carotene, the content of which decreased markedly when the orange snack was stored at 20 ºC.

Originality/value

Few studies have evaluated the stability of food products during home storage. The findings showed that the maximum storage time to ensure a proper texture of the orange snack studied is between two and six months, both at 4 and 20 ºC. However, from the point of view of the conservation of both vitamin C and, especially, of β-carotene, it is recommended that this product be stored in refrigeration.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 December 2021

Francisco José Torres-Ruiz, Elisa Garrido-Castro and María Gutiérrez-Salcedo

Consumer knowledge has been one of the most studied variables in marketing due to its strong influence on consumer behaviour. Knowledge level has traditionally been…

Abstract

Purpose

Consumer knowledge has been one of the most studied variables in marketing due to its strong influence on consumer behaviour. Knowledge level has traditionally been measured through objective knowledge and the number of correct answers in a battery of items about product characteristics. The authors argue that this analysis could be complemented with other information, that is, the structure of non-knowledge. The main objective of this work is to explore the nature and explanatory potential of this new dimension on consumer behaviour in the agrifood context. The principal hypothesis is that, while they may have similar levels of objective knowledge, there are significant differences between the behaviour of consumers who have a predominant pattern of ignorance (tendency to answer “I don't know”) and those who are in error (tendency to give wrong answers).

Design/methodology/approach

The present study draws on data derived from five case studies examining consumer knowledge about agrifood products (olive oils, Iberian ham and orange juice) and certain aspects of consumer behaviour. A sample of 4,112 participants was classified into two non-knowledge profiles: wrong, if most items answered incorrectly in a questionnaire were wrong; or ignorant, if most items answered incorrectly were “don't know”.

Findings

The results obtained supported the argument that complementing the study of consumer knowledge with an analysis of the structure of non-knowledge is worthwhile, as differences within the structure are associated with different patterns of consumer behaviour.

Originality/value

In the present study, it is proposed that the measurement of knowledge be complemented with an analysis of the consumer's non-knowledge structure (items not answered correctly), given its effects on behaviour, an aspect hitherto unconsidered in the literature. To do so, a new index is proposed.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 124 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 September 2020

Tainara Leal de Sousa, Jessyca Pinheiro da Silva, Ariadne Ribeiro Lodete, Daniele Silva Lima, Abner Alves Mesquita, Adrielle Borges de Almeida, Geovana Rocha Placido and Mariana Buranelo Egea

This study aims to analyze the levels of vitamin C, phenolic compounds and antioxidants in baby food. Providing nutritious food to the infants is essential for their…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyze the levels of vitamin C, phenolic compounds and antioxidants in baby food. Providing nutritious food to the infants is essential for their growth and development. Baby foods are foods prepared from any suitable nutritive material and intended for feeding children after six months of age. The search for foods that meet the nutritional needs of children and that also promote aspects of health has increased on the part of parents.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 17 different types of baby foods (2 brands) were purchased and the vitamin C content, total phenolic compounds (TPC) and antioxidant activity were determined. The authors also assessed the adequacy of labeling in accordance with regulatory parameters. Data was submitted to analysis of variance, and the means were compared by the Tukey test at 5% probability. Principal component analysis was performed to evaluate the results (phenolic compounds, vitamin C and antioxidant activity) from the multidimensional point of view.

Findings

In general, the labeling of baby foods proved to be within the legislation, but with confusing information for the consumer. BF7-AAPO (apple pulp and juice, papaya and orange juice), BF-BAO (banana, apple juice and oatmeal) and BF-AA (apple pulp and juice) showed the highest vitamin C content (20–28 mg/100 g; p < 0.001). BF-A (apple), BF-B (banana) and BF-AA showed the highest TPC (7–8.2 mg/100 g; p < 0.001). BF-CP (cassava-parsley), BF-PCBCP (potato, carrot, beef and cassava-parsley) and BF-PCBB (potato, carrot, beef and broccoli) showed the highest antioxidant activity (44–48%; p < 0.001). High value of TPC was related to high value of antioxidant activity in baby foods. In conclusion, vitamin C content in the baby foods was different from those reported on the labels and there was a direct relationship between the content of TPC and the antioxidant capability.

Originality/value

The objective of this work was to evaluate bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity in baby foods. So far, few papers have reported on the subject as the authors seek to know about essential nutrients. However, this knowledge is important because these compounds can decrease and/or prevent inflammatory processes in the body.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 51 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 November 2021

Liew Phing Pui, Ianne Kong, Roselina Karim, Yus Aniza Yusof, Chen Wai Wong and Hasanah Mohd Ghazali

The purpose of this research is to produce “cempedak” juice using enzyme aided-liquefaction by examining the effects of enzyme types (Pectinex® Ultra SP-L, Celluclast…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to produce “cempedak” juice using enzyme aided-liquefaction by examining the effects of enzyme types (Pectinex® Ultra SP-L, Celluclast® 1.5 L and Fungamyl® 800 L), enzyme concentrations (0–1.5% v/w), incubation time (0–2.5 h) and incubation temperature (35–60 °C) on juice yield and viscosity, total soluble solids and color of fruit puree.

Design/methodology/approach

Ripe “cempedak” pulp from CH28 fruit was first pureed in a blender and then homogenized with water at 1:2 ratio. The diluted puree was then liquefied with the enzymes separately to reduce its viscosity. Analyses such as juice yield, viscosity, total soluble solids and color of the liquefied “cempedak” puree were then carried out.

Findings

Results indicated that the optimized use of 1.2% (v/w) Celluclast® 1.5 L (Novozymes, Denmark), a cellulase preparation, at 45 °C and 1 h produced juice with the lowest viscosity (349.4 cP) and the highest juice yield (82.3% v/w). Liquefied “cempedak” juice was darker (with L* value of 51.17) and more yellowish (b* value of 38.88) compared to “cempedak” juice without liquefaction (control). When compared to untreated “cempedak” juice, the droplet size of “cempedak” juice obtained after liquefaction under optimized conditions was found to be lower, regardless of whether the juice was filtered (with a total reduction of 23% of droplet size) or not filtered (with a total reduction of 16% of droplet size). The results indicate the possibility of employing Celluclast® 1.5 L to produce “cempedak” juice that can be further processed such as for the production of “cempedak” fruit powder.

Originality/value

This paper provides information on the enzyme concentration, incubation time and temperature for liquefying “cempedak” pulp such that the liquefied material produced can be used as a base feed for spray-drying to produce “cempedak” fruit powder.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 124 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Timothy Calkins

Chuck Smith, senior brand manager of A.1. Steak Sauce, learns that Lawry's will soon be launching a steak sauce product. He has to determine whether A.1. should defend its…

Abstract

Chuck Smith, senior brand manager of A.1. Steak Sauce, learns that Lawry's will soon be launching a steak sauce product. He has to determine whether A.1. should defend its business and, if so, what A.1. should do. In formulating the recommendation, he has to consider competitive dynamics and work through the financial implications.

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1967

The long‐awaited regulations to provide statutory compositional requirements for the ever‐increasing range of meat products have at last arrived; presented in the form of…

Abstract

The long‐awaited regulations to provide statutory compositional requirements for the ever‐increasing range of meat products have at last arrived; presented in the form of a triology—The Canned Meat Product Regulations, The Meat Pie and Sausage Roll Regulations and The Sausage and Other Meat Product Regulations—all of which apply to England and Wales only; presumably the Scottish counterparts, modified for the geographical variations in commodities, will appear in due course. The Meat Pie and Sausage Roll Regulations come into operation on May 31 1968; the other two on May 31 1969.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 69 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Amani AlJahani and Rana Cheikhousman

Pumpkins are a rich source of essential nutrients, namely, β-carotene, minerals and vitamins, and they are therefore suitable for making functional juice. This study aims…

Abstract

Purpose

Pumpkins are a rich source of essential nutrients, namely, β-carotene, minerals and vitamins, and they are therefore suitable for making functional juice. This study aims to develop pumpkin-based functional juice and assess the acceptability of the product by various consumers. In total, 55 per cent of the panelists disliked the pumpkin juice because of its strong off-flavor. Consequently, different blends of pumpkin juice with mango, orange, strawberry and green apple juices were prepared and evaluated for global appreciation and descriptive sensory analysis.

Methodology

Pumpkins, green apples, mangos, oranges and strawberries were obtained from the local market. Four mixtures of juices were prepared by mixing pumpkin and mango juice (750/250, v/v), pumpkin and green apple juice (750/250, v/v), pumpkin and orange juice (750/250, v/v) and pumpkin with strawberry and orange juice (750/125/125, v/v/v). The contents of moisture ash, fiber, carbohydrate, crude protein and lipids were estimated according to AOAC methods. β-Carotene, vitamin C and minerals were determined. A semi-trained panel consisting of 100 members assessed sensory characteristics of pumpkin juice and mixtures using a quantitative descriptive analysis method (QDA) for different attributes.

Findings

The findings show that the moisture, crude protein, fiber, ash and carbohydrate contents indicate that the developed pumpkin juice was rich in these essential nutrients. The fiber value in our study was lower than the value previously reported for pumpkin. The content of β-carotene and vitamin C in the developed pumpkin juice was considerably higher than that reported previously for fruits. The values of calcium and iron of the current study were much higher than those previously reported in vegetable juices and mixtures. The sensory results revealed that the developed pumpkin-based juice blends are acceptable by the consumers.

Originality value

This study was carried out to develop a suitable formula for preparing functional juices from pumpkin, which is not consumed willingly by children and the elderly; the authors aimed to improve its taste and flavor by mixing it with different fruit juices. The results demonstrated that pumpkin juice is rich in essential nutrients such as vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, suggesting its health-promoting potential. Mixing pumpkin juice with mango juice or orange and strawberry juices significantly improved the sensory quality of the products. Strikingly, the formulated pumpkin juice mixtures received good acceptance and appreciation by children and the elderly, which could promote its use as a functional juice. Generally, pumpkin-based juice blends are rich in vitamins, minerals and antioxidants and can therefore be consumed as a functional beverage with potentially increased health-promoting characteristics. Using pumpkin for developing functional juices could add commercial value to pumpkins. Future studies should specifically focus on large-scale production and commercialization of these juice mixtures.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 July 2013

Alessandra Ferrarezi, Valéria Paula Minim, Karina Maria dos Santos and Magali Monteiro

The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the impact of some labeling aspects on the consumer intent to purchase ready to drink orange juice and nectar.

1705

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the impact of some labeling aspects on the consumer intent to purchase ready to drink orange juice and nectar.

Design/methodology/approach

The influence of label information on the consumer intent to purchase was evaluated by conjoint analysis using a convenience sample (n=149). A factorial design with four characteristics, price, brand, information about the product and kind of beverage, was used. Three levels were established for brand and product information, and two for price and kind of beverage.

Findings

Low price, product information and market leading brand had positive impact. “No preservatives/natural” was the information that most influenced consumer's purchase intent. The ideal label showed the leading brand, low price and information “no preservatives/natural”. These results could be useful for strategic planning of consumer instruction and have important implications for Brazilian orange juice manufactures.

Originality/value

Although the most widely consumed beverages in Brazil are ready to drink orange juice and nectar, it was unexpected that consumers did not know the differences between them and that kind of beverage was not an important factor for the purchase decision.

Article
Publication date: 29 March 2011

Alison M. Kane, Ruthann B. Swanson, Brenda G. Lyon and Elizabeth M. Savage

Staling, the progressive non‐microbial deterioration of quality, is influenced by baked product fat, sugar and moisture levels. Although 50 percent sugar replacement with…

792

Abstract

Purpose

Staling, the progressive non‐microbial deterioration of quality, is influenced by baked product fat, sugar and moisture levels. Although 50 percent sugar replacement with an acesulfame‐K‐dextrose blend, and/or 50 percent fat replacement with dried plum puree, produces acceptable oatmeal and chocolate chip cookies within one day of baking, flavor and texture changes with continued storage are unknown. The purpose of this paper is to profile three oatmeal and chocolate chip cookie formulations.

Design/methodology/approach

Three oatmeal and chocolate chip cookie formulations (control, reduced‐in‐fat (50 percent) and reduced‐in‐fat and sugar (50 percent)) were profiled 1, 3, 5 and 7 days post‐bake by a trained sensory panel (n=8) using the Spectrum®‐approach on 0‐15 point linescales; three replicates were obtained. Water activity was determined on six replicates. Data were analyzed with PROC Mixed and PDIFF (p<0.05).

Findings

Water activity increased with modification; increases (aW<0.60) do not support microbial growth. Day 1 flavor and texture reformulation effects mirror those previously reported. Storage effects across all formulations (p<0.05) on oatmeal and chocolate chip cookie sensory attributes are within one linescale unit. Different significant (p<0.05) formulation×storage interactions suggest staling patterns differ with cookie type. Water activity increased during storage for chocolate chip cookies only; practical significance is questionable. Panelists' comments suggesting oxidative effects for both controls by day 5 are consistent with water activity.

Originality/value

Consumption of products with improved nutritional profiles can assist consumers in bringing their diets in‐line with dietary recommendations. Maximizing benefits requires continued selection of modified rather than non‐modified products. Technical issues (sensory characteristics, nutritional profile and storage convenience) do not appear to limit consumer selection of these reformulated cookies.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

1 – 10 of 117