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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

O.O. UGWU, C.J. ANUMBA and A. THORPE

Domain ontologies facilitate sharing and re‐use of data and knowledge between distributed collaborating systems. A major problem in the design and application of…

Abstract

Domain ontologies facilitate sharing and re‐use of data and knowledge between distributed collaborating systems. A major problem in the design and application of intelligent systems is to capture and understand: the data and information model that describes the domain; the various levels of knowledge associated with problem solving; and the patterns of interaction, information and data flow in the problem solving space. This paper reports the development of an ontology for agent‐based collaborative design of portal structures, using knowledge acquisition techniques and tools. It illustrates the application of the ontology in the development of a prototype multi‐agent systems. The study shows that a common ontology facilitates interaction and negotiation between agents and other distributed systems. The paper discusses the findings from the knowledge acquisition, their implications in the design and implementation of multi‐agent systems, and gives recommendations on developing agent‐based systems for collaborative design and decision‐support in the construction sector.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Sidi Mohamed Benslimane, Mimoun Malki and Djelloul Bouchiha

Web applications are subject to continuous changes and rapid evolution triggered by increasing competition, especially in commercial domains such as electronic commerce…

Abstract

Purpose

Web applications are subject to continuous changes and rapid evolution triggered by increasing competition, especially in commercial domains such as electronic commerce. Unfortunately, usually they are implemented without producing any useful documentation for subsequent maintenance and evolution. Thereof, the maintenance of such systems becomes a challenging problem as the complexity of the web application grows. Reverse engineering has been heralded as one of the most promising technologies to support effective web application maintenance. This paper aims to present a reverse engineering approach that helps understanding existing undocumented web applications to be maintained or evolved.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed approach provides reverse engineering rules to generate a conceptual schema from a given domain ontology by using a set of transformation rules. The reverse engineering process consists of four phases: extracting useful information; identifying a set of ontological constructs representing the concepts of interest; enriching the identified set by additional constructs; and finally deriving a conceptual schema.

Findings

The advantage of using ontology for conceptual data modeling is the reusability of domain knowledge. As a result, the conceptual data model will be made faster, easier and with fewer errors than creating it in usual way. Designers can use the extracted conceptual schema to gain a better understanding of web applications and to assist in their maintenance.

Originality/value

The strong point of this approach is that it relies on a very rich semantic reference that is domain ontology. However, it is not possible to make a straightforward transformation of all elements from a domain ontology into a conceptual data model because ontology is semantically richer than data conceptual models.

Details

International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

Joselaine Valaski, Sheila Reinehr and Andreia Malucelli

The purpose of this research was to evaluate whether ontology integrated in an organizational learning environment may support the automatic learning material…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research was to evaluate whether ontology integrated in an organizational learning environment may support the automatic learning material classification in a specific knowledge area.

Design/methodology/approach

An ontology for recommending learning material was integrated in the organizational learning environment based on ontology. An experiment was performed with 15 experts and 84 learners. Experts and learners were asked to classify 30 learning material related to Software Engineering area. The results obtained from experts and learners were compared with the ontology results.

Findings

Among 30 learning materials evaluated, 24 learning materials got closer to the expert classification using the ontology than using the learners’ manual classification. The learners had difficulties in correctly classifying the learning materials according to the knowledge area applied.

Originality/value

In an autonomous collaborative environment without a tutor responsible for organizing the learning materials shared by collaborators, an ontology may be an auxiliary mechanism to support automatic learning material classification. The proposed ontology uses recommendations given by the collaborators to get the correct knowledge area classification. The correct classification may support retrieval of appropriate learning materials according to the learners’ needs.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Denny Vrandečić, Sofia Pinto, Christoph Tempich and York Sure

Aims to present the ontology engineering methodology DILIGENT, a methodology focussing on the evolution of ontologies instead of the initial design, thus recognizing that

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Abstract

Purpose

Aims to present the ontology engineering methodology DILIGENT, a methodology focussing on the evolution of ontologies instead of the initial design, thus recognizing that knowledge is a tangible and moving target.

Design/methodology/approach

First describes the methodology as a whole, then detailing one of the five main steps of DILIGENT. The second part describes case studies, either already performed or planned, and what we learned (or expect to learn) from them.

Findings

With the case studies it was discovered the strengths and weaknesses of DILIGENT. During the evolution of ontologies, arguments need to be exchanged about the suggested changes. Identifies those kind of arguments which work best for the discussion of ontology changes.

Research implications

DILIGENT recognizes ontology engineering methodologies like OnToKnowledge or Methontology as proven useful for the initial design, but expands them with its strong focus on the user‐centric further development of the ontology and the provided integration of automatic agents in the process of ontology evolution.

Practical implications

With DILIGENT the experience distilled from a number of case studies and offers the knowledge manager a methodology to work in an ever‐changing environment.

Originality/value

DILIGENT is the first methodology to put focus not on the initial development of the ontology, but on the user and his usage of the ontology, and on the changes introduced by the user. We take the user's own view seriously and enable feedback towards the evolution of the ontology, stressing the ontology's role as a shared conceptualisation.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2017

Xiaoming Zhang, Kai Li, Chongchong Zhao and Dongyu Pan

With the increasing spread of ontologies in various domains, units have gradually become an essential part of ontologies and units ontologies have been developed to offer…

Abstract

Purpose

With the increasing spread of ontologies in various domains, units have gradually become an essential part of ontologies and units ontologies have been developed to offer a better expression ability for the practical usage. From the perspectives of architecture, comparison and reuse, the purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive survey on four mainstream units ontologies: quantity-unit-dimension-type, quantities, units, dimensions and values, ontology of units of measure and units ontology (UO) of the open biomedical ontologies, in order to address well the state of the art and the reuse strategies of the UO.

Design/methodology/approach

An architecture of units ontologies is presented, in which the relations between key factors (i.e. units of measure, quantity and dimension) are discussed. The criteria for comparing units ontologies are developed from the perspectives of organizational structure, pattern design and application scenario. Then, the authors compare four typical units ontologies based on the proposed comparison criteria. Furthermore, how to reuse these units ontologies is discussed in materials science domain by utilizing two reuse strategies of partial reference and complete reference.

Findings

Units ontologies have attracted high attention in the scientific domain. Based on the comparison of four popular units ontologies, this paper finds that different units ontologies have different design features from the perspectives of basis structure, units conversion and axioms design; a UO is better to be applied to the application areas that satisfy its design features; and many challenges remain to be done in the future research of the UO.

Originality/value

This paper makes an extensive review on units ontologies, by defining the comparison criteria and discussing the reuse strategies in the materials domain. Based on this investigation, guidelines are summarized for the selection and reuse of units ontologies.

Details

Program, vol. 51 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 11 August 2021

Jeremy S. Liang

This study aims to develop a synthetic knowledge repository consisted of interrelated Web Ontology Language.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop a synthetic knowledge repository consisted of interrelated Web Ontology Language.

Design/methodology/approach

The ontology composes the main framework to categorize data of product life cycle with eco-design mode (PLC-EDM) and automatically infer specialists’ knowledge for data confirmation, eventually assisting the utilizations and generation of strategies toward decision-making

Findings

(i) utilization of a novel model with ontology mode for information reuse cross the different eco-design applications; (ii) generation of a sound platform toward life cycle evaluation; and (iii) implementation of the PLC-EDM model along the product generation process.

Research limitations/implications

It cannot substitute an evaluation tool of life cycle. Certainly, this model does not predict the “target and range” and/or the depiction of the “utility module” that are basic activities in life cycle assessments as characterized through the international organization for standardization regulations.

Practical implications

As portion of this framework, a prototype Web application is presented which is applied to produce, reuse and verify knowledge of product life cycle.

Social implications

By counting upon the ontology, the information conducted by the utilization is certainly semantically represented to promote the data sharing among various participants and tools. Besides, the data can be verified against possible faults by inferring over the ontology. Hence, a feasible way to a popular topic in the domain of eco-design applications extension in the industry.

Originality/value

The goals are: to lean on rigid modeling principles; and to promote the interoperability and diffusion of the ontology toward particular utilization demands.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2008

Rodolfo Stecher, Claudia Niederée, Wolfgang Nejdl and Paolo Bouquet

The discovery of the “right” ontology or ontology part is a central ingredient for effective ontology re‐use. The purpose of this paper is to present an approach for…

Abstract

Purpose

The discovery of the “right” ontology or ontology part is a central ingredient for effective ontology re‐use. The purpose of this paper is to present an approach for supporting a form of adaptive re‐use of sub‐ontologies, where the ontologies are deeply integrated beyond pure referencing.

Design/methodology/approach

Starting from an ontology draft which reflects the intended modeling perspective, the ontology engineer can be supported by suggesting similar already existing sub‐ontologies and ways for integrating them with the existing draft ontology. This paper's approach combines syntactic, linguistic, structural and logical methods into an innovative modeling‐perspective aware solution for detecting matchings between concepts from different ontologies. This paper focuses on the discovery and matching phase of this re‐use process.

Findings

Owing to the combination of techniques presented in this general approach, the work described performs in the general case as well as approaches tailored for a specific usage scenario.

Research limitations/implications

The methods used rely on lexical information obtained from the labels of the concepts and properties in the ontologies, which makes this approach appropriate in cases where this information is available. Also, this approach can handle some missing label information.

Practical implications

Ontology engineering tasks can take advantage from the proposed adaptive re‐use approach in order to re‐use existing ontologies or parts of them without introducing inconsistencies in the resulting ontology.

Originality/value

The adaptive re‐use of ontologies by finding and partially re‐using parts of existing ontological resources for building new ontologies is a new idea in the field, and the inclusion of the modeling perspective in the computation of the matches adds a new perspective that could also be exploited by other matching approaches.

Details

International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2008

Chimay J. Anumba, Raja R.A. Issa, Jiayi Pan and Ivan Mutis

There is an increasing recognition of the value of effective information and knowledge management (KM) in the construction project delivery process. Many architecture…

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2016

Abstract

Purpose

There is an increasing recognition of the value of effective information and knowledge management (KM) in the construction project delivery process. Many architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) organisations have invested heavily in information technology and KM systems that help in this regard. While these have been largely successful in supporting intra‐organisational business processes, interoperability problems still persist at the project organisation level due to the heterogeneity of the systems used by the different organisations involved. Ontologies are seen as an important means of addressing these problems. The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of ontologies in the construction project delivery process, particularly with respect to information and KM.

Design/methodology/approach

A detailed technical review of the fundamental concepts and related work has been undertaken, with examples and case studies of ontology‐based information and KM presented to illustrate the key concepts. The specific issues and technical difficulties in the design and construction context are highlighted, and the approaches adopted in two ontology‐based applications for the AEC sector are presented.

Findings

The paper concludes that there is considerable merit in ontology‐based approaches to information and KM, but that significant technical challenges remain. Middleware applications, such as semantic web‐based information management system, are contributing in this regard but more needs to be done particularly on integrating or merging ontologies.

Originality/value

The value of the paper lies in the detailed exploration of ontology‐based information and KM within a design and construction context, and the use of appropriate examples and applications to illustrate the key issues.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2012

Mohammad Kamal Uddin, Juha Puttonen, Sebastian Scholze, Aleksandra Dvoryanchikova and Jose Luis Martinez Lastra

The purpose of this paper is to present an ontology‐based approach of context‐sensitive computing for the optimization of flexible manufacturing systems (FMS).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an ontology‐based approach of context‐sensitive computing for the optimization of flexible manufacturing systems (FMS).

Design/methodology/approach

A context‐sensitive computing approach is presented, integrated on top of FMS control platform. The approach addresses how to extract manufacturing contexts at source, how to process contextual entities by developing an ontology‐based context model and how to utilize this approach for real time decision making to optimize the key performance indicators (KPIs). A framework for such an optimization support system is proposed. A practical FMS use case within SOA‐based control architecture is considered as an illustrative example and the implementation of the core functionalities to the use case is reported.

Findings

Continuous improvement of the factory can be enhanced utilizing context‐sensitive support applications, which provides an intelligent interface for knowledge acquisition and elicitation. This can be used for improved data analysis and diagnostics, real time feedback control and support for optimization.

Research limitations/implications

The performance of context‐sensitive computing increases with the extraction, modeling and reasoning of as much contexts as possible. However, more computational resources and processing times are associated to this. Hence, the trade‐off should be in between the extent of context processing and the required outcome of the support applications.

Practical implications

This paper includes the practical implications of context‐sensitive applications development in manufacturing, especially in the dynamic operating environment of FMS.

Originality/value

Reported results provide a modular approach of context‐sensitive computing and a practical use case implementation to achieve context awareness in FMS. The results are seen extendable to other manufacturing domains.

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Cristóvão Dinis Sousa, António Lucas Soares and Carla Sofia Pereira

In collaborative settings, such as research and development projects, obtaining the maximum benefit from knowledge management systems depends on the ability of the…

Abstract

Purpose

In collaborative settings, such as research and development projects, obtaining the maximum benefit from knowledge management systems depends on the ability of the different partners to understand the conceptualisation underlying the system’s knowledge organisation. This paper aims to show how information/knowledge organisation in a multi-organisation project can be made more effective if the domain experts are involved in the specification of the systems semantic structure. A particular aspect is further studied: the role of conceptual relations in the process of collaborative development of such structures.

Design/methodology/approach

An action-research approach was adopted, framed by a socio-semantic stance. A collaborative conceptual modelling platform was used to support the members of a research and development project in the process of developing a lightweight ontology aiming at reorganising all the project information in a wiki system. Data collection was carried out by means of participant observation, interviews and a questionnaire.

Findings

The approach to solve the content organisation problem revealed to be effective both in the result and the process. It resulted in a better-organised system, enabling more efficient project information retrieval. The collaborative development of the lightweight ontology embodied, in fact, a learning process, leading to a shared conceptualisation. The research results point to the importance of the elicitation of conceptual relations for structuring the project’s knowledge. These results are important for the design of methods and tools to support the collaborative development of conceptual models.

Originality/value

This paper studies the social process leading to a shared conceptualisation, a subject that has not been sufficiently researched. This case study provides evidence about the importance of the early phases of the construction of ontologies, mainly if domain experts are deeply involved, supported by appropriated tools and guided by well-structured processes.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

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1 – 10 of over 3000