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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Clifton P. Campbell

Instructional materials enhance the teaching/learning process by exhibiting information necessary to acquire knowledge and skills. Focuses on printed forms of…

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1380

Abstract

Instructional materials enhance the teaching/learning process by exhibiting information necessary to acquire knowledge and skills. Focuses on printed forms of instructional materials and provides detailed information, including examples, on five types of job performance aids, three types of instruction sheets, and two types of modules. Checklists of considerations that affect the quality of finished products are also provided. Job performance aids (JPAs)provide procedural or factual guidance in the performance of tasks. They store essential details in a variety of functional forms for use just before or during task performance. Research shows that JPAs are a cost‐effective supplement or alternative to training. They reduce the time needed to master task performance and facilitate the transfer of learning from the training setting to the job. Instruction sheets assure that all trainees have the same complete and accurate information for performing practical work and for completing assignments. These sheets also help manage large groups of trainees with diverse abilities who are working simultaneously at several different tasks. Modules are carefully structured documents which facilitate self‐directed and self‐paced learning. While their components may vary, modules typically include learning objectives, an introduction, instructional content, directions, learning activities, and test questions with feedback answers. With modules, trainees assume personal responsibility for their progress. Regardless of the care used in their preparation, all types of instructional materials must be evaluated prior to general use. Presents a comprehensive quality control procedure for confirming effectiveness and value. This was prepared to enhance both formal classroom instruction and individual study. Figures, tables, checklists, appendices, and a glossary of keywords and terms, supplement the text in explaining the content.

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

Joselaine Valaski, Sheila Reinehr and Andreia Malucelli

The purpose of this research was to evaluate whether ontology integrated in an organizational learning environment may support the automatic learning material

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research was to evaluate whether ontology integrated in an organizational learning environment may support the automatic learning material classification in a specific knowledge area.

Design/methodology/approach

An ontology for recommending learning material was integrated in the organizational learning environment based on ontology. An experiment was performed with 15 experts and 84 learners. Experts and learners were asked to classify 30 learning material related to Software Engineering area. The results obtained from experts and learners were compared with the ontology results.

Findings

Among 30 learning materials evaluated, 24 learning materials got closer to the expert classification using the ontology than using the learners’ manual classification. The learners had difficulties in correctly classifying the learning materials according to the knowledge area applied.

Originality/value

In an autonomous collaborative environment without a tutor responsible for organizing the learning materials shared by collaborators, an ontology may be an auxiliary mechanism to support automatic learning material classification. The proposed ontology uses recommendations given by the collaborators to get the correct knowledge area classification. The correct classification may support retrieval of appropriate learning materials according to the learners’ needs.

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Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

JULIE MCLEOD

This article concerns the preparation and delivery of a part of an existing postgraduate records management course to a sample of records management practitioners at a…

Abstract

This article concerns the preparation and delivery of a part of an existing postgraduate records management course to a sample of records management practitioners at a distance. The project was a pilot study for the subsequent development of a distance learning course in records management in the Department of Information and Library Management at the University of Northumbria at Newcastle. The objectives were to investigate the practitioners' learning experience by analysing their thoughts and feelings recorded in a diary, to assess the suitability of existing learning materials and to identify appropriate delivery methods for different types of materials. Models of both learning and writing distance learning materials were adopted from the literature. Paper, audio and electronic materials were developed. The results will be used to make recommendations for developing the entire course.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Helen Dimou and Achilles Kameas

This paper aims to present a model for the quality assurance of digital educational material that is appropriate for adult education. The proposed model adopts the…

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1147

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a model for the quality assurance of digital educational material that is appropriate for adult education. The proposed model adopts the software quality standard ISO/IEC 9126 and takes into account adult learning theories, Bloom’s taxonomy of learning objectives and two instructional design models: Kolb’s model (the learning cycle) and Gagne, Briggs and Wager’s model.

Design/methodology/approach

The structure of this paper is as follows: in the second section, the theory of “the learning cycle of Kolb” is discussed. The third section discusses the model of Gagne, Biggs & Wager. The fourth section discusses and categorizes the characteristics and sub-characteristics of the quality of digital educational material. The fifth section discusses and categorizes the quality attributes of digital educational material. Moreover, the correlation of the sub-characteristics of the material with the model of Gagne and that of Kolb are examined.

Findings

The authors developed a quality model that adopts the structure of ISO/IEC 9126 standard, using basic notions of theories of adult education to define its characteristics and sub-characteristics. The model has been successfully applied in the quality evaluation of educational material distributed to distance learning adult students.

Originality/value

The innovative combination of an established quality model with sound educational theories yields a comprehensive model that allows both a qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the appropriateness of digital educational material. The applicability of the model is demonstrated by applying it to specific digital materials specially developed for adult education.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2007

Kelly Smith

The Technology Enhanced Enterprise Education project (TE3) promotes the use of learning technologies to enhance enterprise and entrepreneurship education in the 12 HEI…

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871

Abstract

Purpose

The Technology Enhanced Enterprise Education project (TE3) promotes the use of learning technologies to enhance enterprise and entrepreneurship education in the 12 HEI partners of the Mercia Institute of Enterprise (MIE). This paper describes the formal processes and procedures underpinning TE3, describes issues around material development and use, and comments on the lessons learned and added value outcomes experienced by community members.

Design/methodology/approach

TE3 works as a community of practice with regular events and online support for the sharing of materials and experience. Materials developed with TE3 funds are made available to all partners to download, adapt, and use for educational or research purposes. Community learning is captured via quarterly progress and end‐of‐project forms which ask educators to reflect on the lessons they have learned, and to note any added‐value benefits that have emerged as a result of material development.

Findings

Since its creation in August 2003, over 13,000 students have been registered to learn about enterprise using TE3 developed materials, and over 500 members of staff have been involved with TE3 through projects or training events. Educators have reported that TE3 has led to increased skills and knowledge for both themselves and their students, and increased the pool of resources available. Added‐value outcomes include increased research output, increased links with small firms, and links between academics and educators from different institutions that may not otherwise have arisen.

Practical implications

TE3 demonstrates how enterprise educators can work together to share resources and expertise, whilst embedding enterprise education within a sustainable local context, either as a dedicated module, or within a student's normal programme of study. The lessons learned by TE3 as a whole will be of use to those supporting enterprise educators, and those learned by individual TE3 projects can inform good practice in the use of e‐learning to support enterprise students.

Originality/value

TE3 has successfully supported educators and facilitated the spread of enterprise education to students in West Midlands HEIs across all subject disciplines. It is now moving into a second phase which will concentrate on dissemination of the materials produced and in supporting the community of educators that has emerged.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 49 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Bob Little

An outline of two large organisations’ independent searches for a suitable system that enables them to create, collate and curate digital learning materials, along with…

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312

Abstract

Purpose

An outline of two large organisations’ independent searches for a suitable system that enables them to create, collate and curate digital learning materials, along with updating, managing them and monitoring their use efficiently and effectively. The purpose of this paper is to examine the challenges and issues each organisation faces – and sets out how they have overcome them satisfactorily, having reached, independently, a common conclusion.

Design/methodology/approach

Two case studies, making use of producer, distributor and user interviews.

Findings

Discovering the appropriate learning content management system (LCMS) for your organisation can bring tangible benefits – for the organisation (via improving productivity, efficiency and eliminating “silos” in production), learning and development professionals (in charge of the whole process) and individual workers/learners.

Research limitations/implications

The value of a LCMS in meeting business and learning needs – from the points of view of both content creation and accessing learning materials.

Practical implications

Implemented successfully, an LCMS can improve learning content developers’ productivity in quantity and quality terms – among other things, through providing a standard framework that produces homogeneity of approach and look-and-feel to the learning materials. This helps improve learning and development professionals’ efficiency and effectiveness. It also enables the organisation to achieve its business targets and goals through developing its people. Moreover, accessing the LCMS through the Cloud means that all the custom-built content produced by third party developers exists on the system. This makes it simpler, easier and faster to update these materials.

Social implications

Through the LCMS, learners can access what they need as and whenever they require it.

Originality/value

An attempt to discern modern approaches to in-house learning content development through two recent cases.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Seedwell T.M. Sithole

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of two instructional design formats on learning outcomes in introductory accounting.

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558

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of two instructional design formats on learning outcomes in introductory accounting.

Design/methodology/approach

This study describes split-source instructional designs and uses an experiment administered to two groups of students enrolled in an undergraduate introductory accounting subject. The performance scores in recall and transfer test items are used to evaluate students’ learning outcomes.

Findings

The study suggests that instructors can enhance students understanding of introductory accounting by integrating text and diagrams in introductory accounting.

Practical implications

University instructors require evidence of teaching and learning activities that enhance student learning during the study of introductory accounting. This study shows that a redesign of accounting instructional material improves students’ performance and learning experience.

Originality/value

This study addresses a gap in the literature by examining the use of integrated instructional materials as an alternative to the separate diagram and text when learning accounting. The study also explores the effect of reorganising learning material on students load by analysing the mental effort reported by students. Finally, the study contributes useful findings on reorganising accounting instructional material aimed at enhancing the understanding of introductory accounting.

Details

Accounting Research Journal, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1030-9616

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2003

Cheryl L Rosaen, Christine Degnan, Teresa VanStratt and Kathryn Zietlow

Learning to teach in ways that are academically, linguistically and culturally responsive to diverse learners in today’s schools is a complex and challenging endeavor for…

Abstract

Learning to teach in ways that are academically, linguistically and culturally responsive to diverse learners in today’s schools is a complex and challenging endeavor for novice and experienced teachers. In recent years, educators in schools and universities have been collaborating to create more powerful ways for prospective and practicing teachers to explore and develop what some call “best practice” in teaching and learning (Zemelman, Daniels & Hyde, 1993, 1998). Meanwhile, the advent of new technologies has provided exciting opportunities to invent innovative ways to document, explore and enhance our understanding of teaching as a professional practice. Many educators have written about the rich potential of hypermedia to document the everyday work in which teachers engage – curriculum development, planning, teaching, assessment and reflection – in ways that preserve the highly contextualized and situated nature of teaching practice (Lacey & Merseth, 1993; Lampert & Ball, 1998; Spiro & Jehng, 1990). Video clips of classroom teaching and artifacts associated with it (e.g. student work, the teacher’s reflections, planning documents, district curriculum) can be accessed by computer in flexible, non-linear ways. Moreover, the use of hypermedia materials affords opportunities for novice and experienced teachers to engage together in taking an inquiring stance to investigate practice and to generate new understandings and insights that can inform future practices (Lampert & Ball, 1999). Lacey and Merseth (1993) argued that hypermedia is a curricular innovation that addresses “three currently held beliefs about teaching and learning to teach: namely, that teaching is complex and context-dependent; that engaging in the construction of knowledge about teaching is a powerful way to learn it; and that learning to teach can be greatly enhanced by participation in a community of inquiry” (p. 547).

Details

Using Video in Teacher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-232-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1997

Bob Hunter

The Effective Learning Programme (ELP) and the intranet to support it have been in development since 1993. Key to these developments have been the Department of Learning

Abstract

The Effective Learning Programme (ELP) and the intranet to support it have been in development since 1993. Key to these developments have been the Department of Learning Support (LS) and the Learning Development Unit (LDU). LS consists of library, media, languages and academic computing, and the LDU is a central unit that works with schools and departments to develop initiatives in teaching and learning. LS's role in ELP included the development of IT skills materials; online diagnostic testing and profiling tools; and the intranet that supports ELP. This paper outlines the development phases of ELP and highlights the key role of LS.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Julius T. Nganji and Mike Brayshaw

The purpose of this paper is to address how virtual learning environments (VLEs) can be designed to include the needs of learners with multiple disabilities. Specifically…

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1082

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address how virtual learning environments (VLEs) can be designed to include the needs of learners with multiple disabilities. Specifically, it employs AI to show how specific learning materials from a huge repository of learning materials can be recommended to learners with various disabilities. This is made possible through employing semantic web technology to model the learner and their needs.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews personalised learning for students with disabilities, revealing the shortcomings of existing e-learning environments with respect to students with multiple disabilities. It then proceeds to show how the needs of a student with multiple disabilities can be analysed and then simple logical operators and knowledge-based rules used to personalise learning materials in order to meet the needs of such students.

Findings

It has been acknowledged in literature that designing for cases of multiple disabilities is difficult. This paper shows that existing learning environments do not consider the needs of students with multiple disabilities. As they are not flexibly designed and hence not adaptable, they cannot meet the needs of such students. Nevertheless, it is possible to anticipate that students with multiple disabilities would use learning environments, and then design learning environments to meet their needs.

Practical implications

This paper, by presenting various combination rules to present specific learning materials to students with multiple disabilities, lays the foundation for the design and development of learning environments that are inclusive of all learners, regardless of their abilities or disabilities. This could potentially stimulate designers of such systems to produce such inclusive environments. Hopefully, future learning environments will be adaptive enough to meet the needs of learners with multiple disabilities.

Social implications

This paper, by proposing a solution towards developing inclusive learning environments, is a step towards inclusion of students with multiple disabilities in VLEs. When these students are able to access these environments with little or no barrier, they will be included in the learning community and also make valuable contributions.

Originality/value

So far, no study has proposed a solution to the difficulties faced by students with multiple disabilities in existing learning environments. This study is the first to raise this issue and propose a solution to designing for multiple disabilities. This will hopefully encourage other researchers to delve into researching the educational needs of students with multiple disabilities.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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