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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2019

Debabrata Ghosh, Peeyush Mehta and Balram Avittathur

The purpose of this paper is to understand the practices and policies unique to high-tech manufacturing start-ups in emerging economies, such as India. The study analyzes…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the practices and policies unique to high-tech manufacturing start-ups in emerging economies, such as India. The study analyzes the main features and challenges of the high-tech manufacturing sector, and the way in which enabling environment including policy making, supply chain capability and related technologies through Industry 4.0 could be leveraged to foster growth.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper undertakes an exploratory approach through in-depth semi-structured interviews conducted with high-tech manufacturing firms in various stages of their growth. The paper provides evidence of the challenges that high-tech manufacturing firms face in India, the strategies they adopt and highlights the role of institutional structures and policies.

Findings

Findings show that high-tech manufacturing start-ups in India face various challenges in the upstream, production and downstream supply chain processes. Further, issues related to availability of quality material, quality suppliers, contracts, funding and access to markets remain. Results also show that enabling operational and financial levers could be created by policy makers and other stakeholders to help the high-tech manufacturing start-ups scale faster and create value.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the R&D intensive industry and high-tech manufacturing literature in the context of emerging economies, such as India, and provides a rigorous overview of the start-up ecosystem in high-tech manufacturing.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2014

Karin Hellerstedt, Karl Wennberg and Lars Frederiksen

This chapter investigates how regional start-up rates in the knowledge-intensive services and high-tech industries are influenced by knowledge spillovers from both…

Abstract

This chapter investigates how regional start-up rates in the knowledge-intensive services and high-tech industries are influenced by knowledge spillovers from both universities and firm-based R&D activities. Integrating insights from economic geography and organizational ecology into the literature on entrepreneurship, we develop a theoretical framework which captures how both supply- and demand-side factors mold the regional bedrock for start-ups in knowledge-intensive industries. Using multilevel data of all knowledge-intensive start-ups across 286 Swedish municipalities between 1994 and 2002 we demonstrate how characteristics of the economic and political milieu within each region influence the ratio of firm births. We find that knowledge spillovers from universities and firm-based R&D strongly affect the start-up rates for both high-tech firms and knowledge-intensive services firms. Further, the start-up rate of knowledge-intensive service firms is tied more strongly to the supply of university educated individuals and the political regulatory regime within the municipality than start-ups in high-tech industries. This suggests that knowledge-intensive service-start-ups are more susceptible to both demand-side and supply-side context than is the case for high-tech start-ups in general. Our study contributes to the growing stream of research that explains entrepreneurial activity as shaped by contextual factors, most notably academic institutions, such as universities that contribute to knowledge-intensive start-ups.

Details

Academic Entrepreneurship: Creating an Entrepreneurial Ecosystem
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-984-3

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Book part
Publication date: 4 August 2014

Noriko Taji

The global strategies of high-tech start-ups fall into two types. One is characteristic of knowledge-based firms; the other is characteristic of knowledge-intensive firms…

Abstract

The global strategies of high-tech start-ups fall into two types. One is characteristic of knowledge-based firms; the other is characteristic of knowledge-intensive firms. We present two propositions related to timing of globalization and resource acquisition for each type and examine four case studies from the region around Cambridge University in the United Kingdom.

Knowledge-based start-ups target global markets from the very beginning, aiming at rapid market penetration. From the start they are highly globalized in acquiring core technology and financial and human resources.

In contrast, knowledge-intensive start-ups start in local markets and initially restrict acquisition of core technology and financial and human resources to those markets. Only at a later stage, when the local business is solidly established, do they gradually expand their businesses to global markets.

Details

Exploration and Exploitation in Early Stage Ventures and SMEs
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-655-2

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Book part
Publication date: 23 December 2010

Basil G. Englis, Paula D. Englis, Aard Groen and Peter van der Sijde

The founder of paperbackswap.com, Bobby Swarthout, developed the idea for his venture while he was a college student. As a student on a limited budget, he had become tired…

Abstract

The founder of paperbackswap.com, Bobby Swarthout, developed the idea for his venture while he was a college student. As a student on a limited budget, he had become tired of paying high prices for textbooks. So he developed and launched an online textbook swapping service. Along with a small group of students, he managed to assemble a group of 12 colleges and universities across the United States to participate in textbook swapping. However, after a few months, very few students had used the site. By listening to the potential customers who chose not to participate, Bobby found out that there were too many easy substitutes for the swapping service (e.g. bookstore returns, half.com, efollett, etc.). These alternatives offered either greater convenience or cash in return for used books (especially appealing to students who did not pay for their books themselves), or other appealing features. However, Mr. Swarthout believed in his concept and also listened to the ‘voice-of-the-consumer’ (VOC) and moved his business idea into different consumer/product space: that of paperback books. Along with a few lead users attracted to his original idea, he refined the original idea, gathered resources (an angel who invested in the business) and added technological capabilities. One year later he launched paperbackswap.com. From inception, the firm embraced the VOC as the key tool in driving product development and improvement efforts. For paperbackswap.com listening to the VOC has become part of a closed-loop system where inputs from consumers are analysed and product improvements developed in response and where the loop is closed by listening to how consumers respond to product changes.

Details

New Technology-Based Firms in the New Millennium
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-374-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

John Sterling

Rubicon Technology, a materials science company focused primarily on the manufacture and marketing of high quality single crystals possesses unique and advantageous…

Abstract

Rubicon Technology, a materials science company focused primarily on the manufacture and marketing of high quality single crystals possesses unique and advantageous technology. But having technological advantages is not enough. Concerted focus is required to translate that technical advantage into product performance that makes a significant difference in customer operations. With market intelligence, an honest self‐assessment and logical analysis, a sustainable market position was developed. The company avoided the temptation of chasing the market with the greatest upside potential and instead elected to target products and markets that were more accessible and aligned well with the experience and capabilities of the company’s technical and operations staffs. Recently, the company has invested enough (in manufacturing facilities and knowledge) to keep its future options open relative to additional vertical integration. Rubicon’s experience with strategic alliances confirms that they can play a crucial role in closing capability gaps and delivering a total package of value to key segments of the market. Rubicon has succeeded largely because, after selecting products and markets that offered excellent potential returns, it focused relentlessly on improving and aligning its technology and its operations to meet expressed customer and market needs. Rubicon has captured at least 10 percent of the LED/LD substrate market worldwide. More importantly, it has moved quickly from the high burn rate of a start‐up to breakeven, and it is on the road to profitability.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2018

Carolin Auschra, Timo Braun, Thomas Schmidt and Jörg Sydow

The creation of a new venture is at the heart of entrepreneurship and shares parallels with project-based organizing: embedded in an institutional context, founders have…

Abstract

Purpose

The creation of a new venture is at the heart of entrepreneurship and shares parallels with project-based organizing: embedded in an institutional context, founders have to assemble a team that works on specified tasks within a strict time constraint, while the new venture undergoes various transitions. The purpose of this paper is to explore parallels between both streams of research and an increasing projectification of entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based upon a case study of the Berlin start-up ecosystem including the analysis of interviews (n=52), secondary documents, and field observations.

Findings

The paper reveals that – shaped by their institutional context – patterns of project-like organizing have become pertinent to the new venture creation process. It identifies a set of facets from the entrepreneurial ecosystems – more specifically different types of organizational actors, their occupational backgrounds, and epistemic communities – that enable and constrain the process of new venture creation in a way that is typical for project-based organizing.

Originality/value

This study thus elaborates on how institutional settings enforce what has been called “projectification” in the process of new venture creation and discuss implications for start-up ecosystems.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Katherina Kuschel, María-Teresa Lepeley, Fernanda Espinosa and Sebastián Gutiérrez

Women in entrepreneurship can have a significant impact on economic and social development globally and particularly in developing countries. But the challenges…

Abstract

Purpose

Women in entrepreneurship can have a significant impact on economic and social development globally and particularly in developing countries. But the challenges entrepreneurial women face are unique and multiple, pressing the need for research and policies to maximize impact. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the challenges women start-up founders face to secure funding in the technology industry. The tech industry was selected because it is a non-traditional industry for women with high potential for role models to bridge an existing gap in information on women start-up founders to secure capital financing to attain business sustainability. It covers venture capital investors’ role, Latin American cultural reasons, and gender.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on an inductive, qualitative approach and in-depth interviews with 20 women entrepreneurs and start-up founders from Latin American countries who received support from the Chilean Government sponsored accelerator “Start-Up Chile.”

Findings

The analysis uncovered ten aspects that impact entrepreneurial women founders’ access to capital in three categories: capital needs, networks, and individual characteristics.

Originality/value

This study identifies factors that affect women entrepreneurs in raising capital and in facing the following challenges: first, working in a non-traditional field for women as it is the technology industry, and second assuming a leadership role as start-up founders. The results offer recommendation with potential to drive public policies in Latin America, which may be scalable to other developing and also to developed countries where market systems prevail. The findings show that women entrepreneurs, but also men, seeking start-up financing and alternatives are a viable source of employment and economic sustainability to mitigate the effects of increasing levels of unemployment worldwide.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

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Book part
Publication date: 23 December 2010

Ray Oakey and Gary Cook

In Chapter 2, providing a contextual introduction to the issue of university spin-offs, Hogan and Quan Zhou seek to construct a better definition of what the term…

Abstract

In Chapter 2, providing a contextual introduction to the issue of university spin-offs, Hogan and Quan Zhou seek to construct a better definition of what the term ‘spin-off’ should consist. After a wide-ranging review of previous attempts to define and classify aspects of the spin-off process, the authors offer their own ‘three-point’ checklist which seeks to clarify and define the ‘spin-off’ process. In conclusion, their paper seeks to assess the advantages and drawbacks of the system they recommend. This initial paper in this section is welcome since it illustrates that not only do academics differ over how to assist the ‘spin-off’ process, but they also often do not agree on how this process is to be defined.

Details

New Technology-Based Firms in the New Millennium
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-374-4

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2008

Leona Achtenhagen and Dodo zu Knyphausen‐Aufsess

To date, entrepreneurship education mainly targets pupils of different age groups as well as undergraduate and graduate students. Despite a growing interest in…

Abstract

Purpose

To date, entrepreneurship education mainly targets pupils of different age groups as well as undergraduate and graduate students. Despite a growing interest in entrepreneurship there are few doctoral programs solely dedicated to it. Doctoral education is a crucial element to develop qualified scholars in the field, especially in countries without a strong tradition in entrepreneurship education. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to present and discuss a doctoral program in high‐tech entrepreneurship in Germany as a good‐practice case for establishing such programs.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a single‐case study. Both authors were involved in the program in different roles. One played a leading part in designing and running it, the other was recruited into it. Empirically, the case is based on program documentation, personal accounts, as well as communication with other people involved in the program.

Findings

Success factors for establishing a postgraduate entrepreneurship education program include cooperation between different academic institutions, entrepreneurial and established companies, as well as government agencies.

Research limitations/implications

This paper draws heavily on the authors' personal experiences and reflections. Thus, a potential point of criticism is possible bias. Yet, the personal involvement provides unique insights which would otherwise have been difficult to obtain.

Practical implications

Some success factors as well as challenges in setting up and running similar programs are provided.

Originality/value

The value of this paper lies in a detailed account of the case of putting in place a unique high‐technology postgraduate entrepreneurship program. The paper broadens the focus of the entrepreneurship education literature.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Wendy L. Currie

This paper embraces the e‐business model concept as the unit of analysis for investigating the ASP market. It develops three constructs of the ASP business model…

Abstract

This paper embraces the e‐business model concept as the unit of analysis for investigating the ASP market. It develops three constructs of the ASP business model: strategic positioning; product/service portfolio; and customer value proposition. Using a case study method, it discusses the findings from four ASP firms; each having attempted to develop a unique ASP business model. The findings suggest the ASP business model is fundamentally flawed as ASP firms fail to provide the customer with an attractive value proposition.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

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