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Book part
Publication date: 25 August 2020

Vanessa Ratten and Esha Thukral

Although much of the discussion on entrepreneurship education focuses on introducing entrepreneurship skills into other disciplines, the reality is education should be…

Abstract

Although much of the discussion on entrepreneurship education focuses on introducing entrepreneurship skills into other disciplines, the reality is education should be already about challenging existing practices and ways of thinking. This chapter argues that the trend toward integrating entrepreneurship skills into other curricula presents an important shift in teaching practices for sport management teachers. If we begin with the assumption that other disciplines do not have an entrepreneurial mindset, then sport entrepreneurship education cannot be sustainable in its own right but rather needs to be integrated as the foundation for all education courses. Therefore, a number of new approaches to entrepreneurship education are beginning to emerge about the need to develop stronger links between business and other disciplines. These potential synergies will help bring sport entrepreneurship education to the forefront of other disciplines and change sport student's mindsets in terms of learning practices. This chapter aims to contribute to the growing field of sport entrepreneurship education by presenting and analyzing existing research and to suggest future research areas.

Abstract

Details

The Entrepreneurial Dilemma in the Life Cycle of the Small Firm
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-315-0

Book part
Publication date: 14 August 2020

Vanessa Ratten

Entrepreneurship is a form of empowerment as it provides a way for individuals to pursue their dreams. The generation of ideas is at the heart of entrepreneurship and…

Abstract

Entrepreneurship is a form of empowerment as it provides a way for individuals to pursue their dreams. The generation of ideas is at the heart of entrepreneurship and involves assessing new opportunities. Recognizing gaps in the marketplace that new products, services or processes can fill is central to the idea of entrepreneurship. There are many different types of entrepreneurship including social, technological, sport and international that provide a way for ideas to enter the marketplace. This chapter focuses on the way entrepreneurship empowers people and provides a way for novel ideas to gain momentum. By taking a knowledge spillover and ecosystems perspective, the chapter highlights the way entrepreneurship gives strength to those with a creative idea. Thereby, acting as a form of empowerment, entrepreneurship provides a way for practitioners and researchers to make a positive contribution to society.

Details

Entrepreneurship as Empowerment: Knowledge Spillovers and Entrepreneurial Ecosystems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-551-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 October 2019

Vanessa Ratten and Leo-Paul Dana

This book provides an opportunity to explore the societal effects of entrepreneurship and its result on competitiveness. Over the last decade society has changed as the…

Abstract

This book provides an opportunity to explore the societal effects of entrepreneurship and its result on competitiveness. Over the last decade society has changed as the consequence of demographic shifts and increased usage of information communications technology. This has influenced the type of entrepreneurship individuals and firms to engage in and the focus of their businesses. Despite the importance of society to the speed and rate of entrepreneurship, little research exists that specifically examines societal entrepreneurship and competitiveness. This book aims at narrowing this research gap by discussing the interface between society and entrepreneurship. The core theme emerging from the chapters in this book is that the context of entrepreneurship is dependent on societal perceptions.

Details

Societal Entrepreneurship and Competitiveness
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-471-7

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2017

Jeanne M. Hossenlopp

The location of entrepreneurship centers on university campuses has been the subject of debate as the traditional model of business school centers has been challenged by…

Abstract

The location of entrepreneurship centers on university campuses has been the subject of debate as the traditional model of business school centers has been challenged by development of centralized structures. The purpose of this chapter is to explore some of the benefits and challenges when a center transitions from a college-based structure to one that is centrally controlled. This chapter provides a qualitative case study of the transition of an entrepreneurship center from a business college to a centralized model housed under a campus-wide office of research and innovation. It argues that a centralized entrepreneurship center can promote campus partnerships on programming, connect the center more effectively with other centralized resources, increase participation from students and faculty from a wider range of colleges, and provide a platform for cross-college collaboration. A key challenge can be the potential separation from faculty research and curriculum development.

Book part
Publication date: 25 August 2020

Vanessa Ratten

Sport entrepreneurship is one of the newer forms of entrepreneurship but is rapidly gaining popularity due to its ability to merge theory with practice. The main…

Abstract

Sport entrepreneurship is one of the newer forms of entrepreneurship but is rapidly gaining popularity due to its ability to merge theory with practice. The main difference between sport entrepreneurship and other forms of entrepreneurship is the incorporation of an interdisciplinary perspective. This means unlike other forms of entrepreneurship that are either focused on financial or nonfinancial aspects, sport entrepreneurship offers a unique hybrid conceptualization of entrepreneurship that acknowledges the complexity of the global economic environment. This chapter addresses the need for more research on sport entrepreneurship to take a holistic approach to understanding its meaning and application in business studies.

Article
Publication date: 24 November 2022

Rachael Behr and Virgil H. Storr

There is a large literature about crisis entrepreneurship, spanning from necessity, natural disaster and long-term conflict entrepreneurship. This paper situates pandemic…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a large literature about crisis entrepreneurship, spanning from necessity, natural disaster and long-term conflict entrepreneurship. This paper situates pandemic entrepreneurship as a unique form of crisis entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors utilize the Kirznerian and Schumpeterian theories of entrepreneurship to understand pandemic entrepreneurship. Using evidence from the US COVID-19 pandemic, the authors argue that pandemics impact both the “identification” and “action” moments of entrepreneurship.

Findings

The Kirznerian identification moment becomes much more uncertain for entrepreneurs because of fluctuating conditions, such as public health conditions, new potential variants of the virus causing the pandemic, shifting government mandates and rules and so forth. The Schumpeterian action moment becomes more challenging because of the necessity of physical distancing and because, generally, all crises raise the cost of entrepreneurial action. That said, the authors still document considerable entrepreneurship during pandemics as entrepreneurs adapt to the increased uncertainty and costs by rely upon local and customary knowledge.

Research limitations/implications

This research finds that entrepreneurs, depending upon the crisis, face differing constraints. Specifically in times of pandemic, entrepreneurs face difficulty recognizing opportunities because of shifting conditions and acting upon opportunities because of financial and political constraints. This research thus implies that there are large opportunities for alleviation of such constraints if there were to be future variants or pandemics.

Practical implications

Practically speaking, this research affects how people study entrepreneurship. By recognizing the differing constraints that pandemic entrepreneurs face, the authors can better understand the last several years, and can also prepare better policy wise for future pandemics or further variants of COVID-19.

Social implications

Socially, entrepreneurship can be a large factor in recovery from disasters and crises. By recognizing and perhaps alleviating constraints that pandemic entrepreneurs face, future crises could have better responses and recoveries.

Originality/value

Although several studies have examined entrepreneurship during the COVID-19 pandemic, the extant literature on pandemic entrepreneurship remains relatively underdeveloped and has not yet focused on what distinguishes pandemic entrepreneurship from other forms of crisis entrepreneurship. The authors highlight what pandemic entrepreneurship has in common with other forms of crisis entrepreneurship and pinpoint the various ways that is distinct.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 November 2022

Romanus Osabohien, Haoma Worgwu and Mamdouh Abdulaziz Saleh Al-Faryan

To mitigate uncertainties in the labour market, it has been argued that technology diffusion in entrepreneurship drive is essential to increase employment capacity…

Abstract

Purpose

To mitigate uncertainties in the labour market, it has been argued that technology diffusion in entrepreneurship drive is essential to increase employment capacity. Against this backdrop, this study examined how social entrepreneurship and technology diffusion impact future employment in Nigeria. In addition, this study aims to contribute to the policy dialogue for the realisation of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) of decent work and economic growth (SDG-8) and industry, innovation and infrastructure (SDG-9).

Design/methodology/approach

The data from the youth entrepreneurship with innovation (YouWiN) baseline survey was used. The study applied propensity score matching to achieve its objectives. This study defines social entrepreneurship as firms established solely to create social values. Similarly, technology diffusion is captured by the firm’s ownership of a website and communication with clients through email, while future employment is captured by the estimated number of people the business may employ in the next five years, if still in operation.

Findings

The results from the study show that social entrepreneurship and technology diffusion has a significant impact on future employment. The result implies that social entrepreneurship may contribute approximately 21% to the employment level in the future. Similarly, technology diffusion – ownership of a website and communication with clients through email increase the firm’s ability to contribute to future employment by 65% and 71%, respectively.

Research limitations/implications

One of the limitations of the research is that the study is quantitative in nature. Thus, qualitative information that could have added additional value to the study was not considered. As a recommendation, further studies should consider using a mixed method by adding qualitative information while examining the concept of social entrepreneurship and employment.

Practical implications

These findings suggest that ownership of a website, communicating with clients via email and involvement in social entrepreneurship contribute significantly to future employment in Nigeria. This finding shows that social entrepreneurship is crucial for reducing future employment uncertainties. Social enterprises will enhance the capacity of the economy to attain sustainable economic development. Therefore, the study concludes by recommending that policies to enhance social entrepreneurship awareness and promotion should be implanted to expand the knowledge of social enterprise as a unique business entity that drives employment.

Social implications

These findings suggest that ownership of a website, communicating with clients via email and involvement in social entrepreneurship contribute significantly to future employment in Nigeria. This finding shows that social entrepreneurship is crucial for reducing future employment uncertainties. Social enterprises will enhance the capacity of the economy to attain sustainable economic development. Therefore, the study concludes by recommending that policies to enhance social entrepreneurship awareness and promotion should be implanted to expand the knowledge of social enterprise as a unique business entity that drives employment.

Originality/value

Though prior studies have examined the contribution of entrepreneurship to employment; however, integration of technology diffusion in the concept of social entrepreneurship and employment literature is relatively sparse. Therefore, this study fills this gap by investigating how the diffusion of technology by social entrepreneurs impacts future employment in Nigeria.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 November 2022

Eugine Tafadzwa Maziriri, Brighton Nyagadza, Tafadzwa C. Maramura and Miston Mapuranga

This study aims to examine how couplepreneurs foster an entrepreneurial mindset in their kids.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how couplepreneurs foster an entrepreneurial mindset in their kids.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research approach with semi-structured interviews was used as the data collection technique. Narrative analysis was conducted on a sample of 20 couplepreneurs in Mthatha, South Africa.

Findings

Narratives of how couplepreneurs foster an entrepreneurial mindset in their kids included purchasing toys and games for kids that encourage entrepreneurship; competition and team activities among kids that are related to entrepreneurship; the piggy bank; encouraging kids to read entrepreneurial books; and kid entrepreneur showcases.

Research limitations/implications

Sample size challenges are a notable limitation, including research being conducted in only one province of South Africa. Caution is advised when attempting to generalise the results to other contexts.

Practical implications

Understanding the strategies used by couplepreneurs to instil an entrepreneurial mindset in children can help parents to influence and encourage their children's entrepreneurial growth, resulting in more creative and innovative people who make a positive contribution to society, economy and the community.

Originality/value

While there is a body of literature on couple entrepreneurship, there are shortcomings in studies examining how coupleprenuers in African countries instil an entrepreneurial mindset in their children. As a result, this study aims to complement the current corpus of African literature on entrepreneurship, particularly in the context of South Africa.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2022

Muhammad Nizam Zainuddin, Rahayu Tasnim and Dzulkifli Mukhtar

This paper aims to examine how the construction of entrepreneurial identity in a cross-disciplinary postgraduate entrepreneurship education program influence students…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how the construction of entrepreneurial identity in a cross-disciplinary postgraduate entrepreneurship education program influence students’ entrepreneurial passion progression as they enact different role identities and concurrently deal with competing microidentities.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the interpretative phenomenological analysis approach, an in-depth study of postgraduate students’ accounts of their lived experiences is conducted.

Findings

Construction of entrepreneurial identity influences students’ entrepreneurial passion progression through a process of “identity ecdysis” that occurs deep within students’ microfoundations as they make sense of the entrepreneurial identity role while simultaneously accommodating their anticipated entrepreneurial life journey. During the transition stage, they begin to let go of their present personal identities and recast new ones based on the revised personal entrepreneurship action agenda. The motivation to change results from the underlying future moral obligation, via a quest to uphold entrepreneurial virtues toward their significant immediate social circles as the aspiring professionals with newly equipped entrepreneurship proficiency. Entrepreneurial passion deepens as they come to grips with their new personal identities as well as new roles and responsibilities.

Research limitations/implications

While this study establishes a foundation for understanding how entrepreneurial passion progresses and is encouraged within an educational framework, it has the potential to be tested on actual entrepreneurs in the macro identity workspace.

Practical implications

Entrepreneurship education programs’ learning experience structure should be designed based on the sources of entrepreneurial passion and is flexible enough to allow for in-depth exploration and self-introspection that supports the enactment of entrepreneurial characteristics that can benefit postgraduate students in their next career move by focusing on the internalization of entrepreneurial virtues, which enables the organic, autonomous construction of entrepreneurial identity. This approach may enable people’s entrepreneurial passions to evolve organically yet profoundly.

Social implications

The provision of entrepreneurial knowledge should be consistent with the goal of enabling students to organize and develop their own identities in pursuit of their next career trajectory.

Originality/value

The study highlights a phenomenon that happens deep inside people’s microfoundations, demonstrating the intensive interplay that exists between dialogic and identity workspaces at one of the established entrepreneurial universities.

Details

On the Horizon: The International Journal of Learning Futures, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

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