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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Tino Bech-Larsen and Laura Kazbare

The purpose of this paper is to describe two exploratory studies of how experience (lacking, failed, or successful) of trying to implement healthy eating behaviours

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe two exploratory studies of how experience (lacking, failed, or successful) of trying to implement healthy eating behaviours influences future intentions to maintain and expand such behaviours (so called “spillover”).

Design/methodology/approach

The two survey-based (n=2,120) studies involved Danes aged 13-15 and 55-70 years, respectively.

Findings

The studies showed that the self-reported experience of successfully increasing the intake of healthy (fruit and vegetables) and decreasing the intake of less healthy (soft drinks and animal fats) categories had spillover effects on the intention to pursue these behaviours in the future. For all the categories included, the intentions of the respondents who had tried and succeeded were significantly higher than those of the other respondents. The intentions of the group who had tried but failed were also significantly higher compared to those of the non-triers. Moreover, whether successful or not, both the experience of trying to increase the intake of healthy and to reduce the intake of less healthy food had a significant positive influence on the intention to try the opposite type of behaviour in the future. Healthy (fruit and vegetables) and decreasing the intake of less healthy (soft drinks and animal fats) categories had spillover effects on the intention to pursue these behaviours in the future. For all the categories included, the intentions of the respondents who had tried and succeeded were significantly higher than those of the other respondents. The intentions of the group who had tried but failed were also significantly higher compared to those of the non-triers. Moreover, whether successful or not, both the experience of trying to increase the intake of healthy and to reduce the intake of less healthy food had a significant positive influence on the intention to try the opposite type of behaviour in the future.

Originality/value

As regards spillover between approach and avoidance behaviours related to healthy eating, only few studies have been published. The studies reported here contribute to the understanding of how experience with different types of healthy eating affect future intentions to change eating habits and provides insight for health promoters in their choice of which specific eating behaviours to address.

Details

Health Education, vol. 114 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Lorena Carrete and Pilar Arroyo

The purpose of this research is to improve the understanding of drivers and inhibitors of healthy diet behaviors in the context of an emerging economy, such as Mexico…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to improve the understanding of drivers and inhibitors of healthy diet behaviors in the context of an emerging economy, such as Mexico, with a severe problem of overweight and obesity. The theory of planned behavior (TPB) and protection motivation theory (PMT) provided the theoretical background for this study.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was used, given the limited amount of information available on consumers’ motivations to change behavior. In-depth interviews with experts in nutrition and four focus groups with consumers from two segments were performed to collect information. Thematic analysis was used to analyze information.

Findings

PMT provided a better explanation of current dietary behavior; the positive attitudes that, according to TPB, are the immediate antecedent of behavior offered a poor explanation for autoreported behaviors. Results indicate that perceived low self-efficacy and high costs prevent change of behavior. Meanwhile, low vulnerability and severity among younger consumers adds to the low intention to adopt a healthier diet. In general, sensorial attributes of products, such as texture, flavor, color, smell and appearance, prevail over nutritional attributes.

Practical implications

The outline of a social marketing program is suggested after the research findings. This program emphasizes prevention and is intended to complement governmental policies designed to modify the environment to facilitate access to healthy food.

Originality value

Social marketing principles have been developed and applied mainly in the context of developed countries. This work contributes to the extension of such principles to an emerging economy with a public health problem related to overweight. Results of the research provide the basis to mold an appropriate intervention.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Book part
Publication date: 29 June 2017

Hannah Andrews, Terrence D. Hill and William C. Cockerham

In this chapter, we draw on health lifestyle, human capital, and health commodity theories to examine the effects of educational attainment on a wide range of individual…

Abstract

Purpose

In this chapter, we draw on health lifestyle, human capital, and health commodity theories to examine the effects of educational attainment on a wide range of individual dietary behaviors and dietary lifestyles.

Methodology/approach

Using data from the 2005-2006 iteration of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n = 2,135), we employ negative binomial regression and binary logistic regression to model three dietary lifestyle indices and thirteen healthy dietary behaviors.

Findings

We find that having a college degree or higher is associated with seven of the thirteen healthy dietary behaviors, including greater attention to nutrition information (general nutrition, serving size, calories, and total fat) and consumption of vegetables, protein, and dairy products. For the most part, education is unrelated to the inspection of cholesterol and sodium information and consumption of fruits/grains/sweets, and daily caloric intake. We observe that having a college degree is associated with healthier dietary lifestyles, the contemporaneous practice of multiple healthy dietary behaviors (label checking and eating behaviors). Remarkably, household income and the poverty-to-income ratio are unrelated to dietary lifestyles and have virtually no impact on the magnitude of the association between education and dietary lifestyles.

Originality/value

Our findings are consistent with predictions derived from health lifestyle and human capital theories. We find no support for health commodity theory, the idea that people who are advantaged in terms of education live healthier lifestyles because they tend to have the financial resources to purchase the elements of a healthy lifestyle.

Details

Food Systems and Health
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-092-3

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Article
Publication date: 17 March 2020

Sian Calvert, Robert C. Dempsey and Rachel Povey

Childhood obesity is a major global health concern. Understanding children's and adolescent’s eating behaviours and promoting healthier behaviours is key for reducing the…

Abstract

Purpose

Childhood obesity is a major global health concern. Understanding children's and adolescent’s eating behaviours and promoting healthier behaviours is key for reducing the negative health outcomes associated with obesity. The current study explored the perceptions of healthy eating behaviours and the influences on eating behaviours amongst 11-to-13-year-old secondary school students.

Design/methodology/approach

Nine semi-structured same-sex focus group discussions were conducted in schools located in deprived areas of England, with the discussions subjected to a thematic framework analysis.

Findings

Three main constructs were identified in the analysis as follows: (1) eating patterns and lifestyle, (2) social influences and (3) environmental influences. Participants understood what healthy eating behaviours are and the benefits of eating healthy; yet, they reported irregular mealtimes and consuming unhealthy snacks. Students reported that their parents and fellow student peers were strong influences on their own eating behaviours, with girls subjected to being teased by male students for attempting to eat healthily. Finally, students perceived that unhealthy foods were cheaper, tasted better and were readily available in their social environments compared to healthier options, making healthier behaviours less likely to occur.

Originality/value

Findings indicate that students had a good understanding of healthy eating behaviours but did not always practise them and are seemingly influenced by their social and environmental context. The promotion of healthier eating in this age group needs to challenge the misperceptions associated with the accessibility and social acceptability of unhealthy food items.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2019

Huseyin Ates

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of elementary school teachers’ psychological factors on their behavioral intentions for healthy nutrition in their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of elementary school teachers’ psychological factors on their behavioral intentions for healthy nutrition in their daily life within an extended version of the theory of planned behavior (TPB).

Design/methodology/approach

The design of the study is correlation study.

Findings

Constructs in the proposal model formed accounted for of variance of intentions and behaviors successfully. Considering the entire proposed model, while personal norm is the most influential factor on intention, self-identity is the most consistent effects on teachers’ behavior. However, among the constructs of TPB, perceived behavioral control is the strongest influence on both intention and behavior.

Originality/value

In the literature, factors affecting healthy behaviors by using TPB focused on mainly children (8–10 year old) and adolescents (11–16 year old) all over the world. However, in some countries, several studies were conducted on adults (e.g. Astrøsm and Rise, 2001; Brouwer and Mosack, 2015), to the best of our knowledge, while there is no study conducted on adults including teachers in Turkey. In addition, recently, two meta-analysis studies were published: Riebl et al. (2015) and Mcdermott et al. (2015). These studies suggested that future studies related to healthy nutrition in the scope of TPB should be continued to investigate.

Details

Health Education, vol. 119 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2018

Yose Rizal

This paper aims to find in-depth information related the activities of “clean and healthy behavior” in household regulations, starting from assessment, planning…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to find in-depth information related the activities of “clean and healthy behavior” in household regulations, starting from assessment, planning, mobilization, implementation monitoring and assessment.

Design/methodology/approach

Data analysis was used for quantitative and qualitative approaches (mixing method). The qualitative approach was used to understand the individual phenomena in terms of finding, obtaining and describing the community behavior, which is related to health problems. The data obtained through the approach were then analyzed using interactive model.

Findings

In principle, this research exactly determines the responses of officers and the community to the process of “clean and healthy living behavior” activities. In general, the health facility used first is self-treatment, before seeking medical treatment or non-drug treatment. It proves that humans are always experimenting. From the research result, there are respondents who do not use medical treatment at 16 per cent; and the remaining 84 per cent are using medical treatment, despite being preceded by self-treatment (S) and non-medical treatment (N).

Originality/value

Currently, there have not been many studies related to the implementation of clean and healthy behavior although the information about it is very important to know. The managers of the “clean and healthy behavior” program need to know such information.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

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Article
Publication date: 30 June 2020

Sik Sumaedi and Sumardjo

This study aims to analyse the influence of descriptive norm, perceived behavioural control, perceived threat of non-communicable disease (NCD), healthy food extension…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyse the influence of descriptive norm, perceived behavioural control, perceived threat of non-communicable disease (NCD), healthy food extension education frequency, the frequency of healthy food community group meetings, healthy food-related newspapers/magazines usage frequency, healthy food-related websites usage frequency and healthy food-related social media usage frequency towards traditional functional food consumption behaviour, especially tempeh, in Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

This study collected data from 99 respondents who consumed traditional functional food. The data were analysed using multiple regression.

Findings

Traditional functional food consumption behaviour is significantly influenced by descriptive norm, perceived behavioural control and the frequency of healthy food community group meetings. The traditional functional food consumption behaviour is not affected by the perceived threat of NCD, healthy food extension education frequency, healthy food-related newspapers/magazines usage frequency, healthy food-related websites usage frequency and healthy food-related social media usage frequency.

Research limitations/implications

This research investigated only one functional food type and employed a purposive sampling technique. Future research should be conducted in other contexts to examine the stability of the research findings.

Practical implications

To improve traditional functional food consumption, it is essential to ensure that people can easily consume traditional functional food. It is also essential to develop an extension education strategy that involves the community's influential person/leader and healthy food community group meetings.

Originality/value

This paper is the first that investigates traditional functional foods consumption behaviour.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Emma Louise Giles and Mary Brennan

The purpose of this paper is to explore the costs and benefits that young adults perceive to be associated with adopting healthier food, alcohol and physical activity…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the costs and benefits that young adults perceive to be associated with adopting healthier food, alcohol and physical activity behaviours. Social marketing is used to identify and change behaviours within a segmented audience. The approach uses theoretical insights, and an appreciation of an individual’s environment, and a suite of methods to understand and suggest approaches to change behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

Focus groups were conducted between April and August 2007 with a sample of 54 young adults aged 19-24 years, from the North East of England. Qualitative thematic analysis was undertaken using Nvivo software.

Findings

Young adults recognise future health benefits that they could gain from following healthier lifestyle behaviours; however, at their present age, their focus is on benefits such as weight regulation and improving one’s appearance. External competitive forces act against these benefits and result in time and effort costs associated with accepting the proposition of healthier lifestyle behaviours.

Originality/value

This paper adds to limited research which has been conducted at the time of “emerging adulthood”, the period of 18-25 years of age. This is despite this being an opportunistic moment in young adult’s lives to encourage them to adopt healthier lifestyle behaviours. Given these results, health messages may need to be reframed to better account for the benefits and costs that young adults associate with healthier lifestyles.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Amanda M Brouwer and Katie E. Mosack

This paper aims to test whether overall and specific healthy eating behaviors and intentions could be better predicted by expanding the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to test whether overall and specific healthy eating behaviors and intentions could be better predicted by expanding the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to include a healthy eater identity. Major health organizations suggest increasing consumption of fruits, vegetables and whole grains to address the growing number of overweight and obese individuals, yet researchers have questioned the degree to which existing behavioral intervention programs sufficiently explain healthy eating behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Adult women (N = 79) completed questionnaires related to TPB components and healthy eater identity. Participants then recorded food consumption for four days using food diaries and food frequency questionnaires.

Findings

Using hierarchical multiple regressions, the authors demonstrated that identity as a healthy eater was a significant predictor of healthy eating intentions beyond the TPB components and a significant predictor of fruit and low-fat dairy consumption and overall healthy eating behaviors.

Research limitations/implications

Despite the limitation of correlational data from a homogenous population, results support previous research and add to existing literature by demonstrating the unique contribution identity has in predicting specific healthy diet behaviors of fruit and low-fat dairy consumption.

Originality/value

Findings advance our understanding of how young women think about nutrition and underscore which healthy eating behaviors might need to be directly targeted in interventions if such behaviors fall outside of the scope of common conceptions of what it means to be a “healthy eater”.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 45 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2019

EunHa Jeong, SooCheong (Shawn) Jang, Carl Behnke, James Anderson and Jonathon Day

The purpose of this study is to explore the dimensions of restaurant customers’ engagement or disengagement with healthy eating in terms of individual and environmental…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the dimensions of restaurant customers’ engagement or disengagement with healthy eating in terms of individual and environmental factors to develop a scale. The results identified the underlying constructs of customers’ individual motives for and perceived barriers to healthy eating, as well as environmental elements of restaurants that encourage or discourage healthy eating.

Design/methodology/approach

To develop an appropriate set of measures to assess factors influencing customers’ healthy eating behaviors at restaurants, the current study undertook the five steps of scale development suggested by Churchill (1979): specifying the domain of constructs, generating a pool of initial measurement items, assessing content adequacy, administering questionnaires (an online survey method) and purifying and finalizing the measurement (via exploratory factor analysis (EFA) using 410 samples and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) using 423 samples).

Findings

The results revealed ten individual factors (health, body image, weight control, feeling better, unappealing food, cost perception, lack of knowledge, state of mind (stress), lack of self-control and negative influences) and five environmental factors (healthy indications, social impact, availability of healthy menu, price policy and unhealthy indications) influencing customers’ healthy eating behaviors at restaurants.

Originality/value

This study developed an appropriate set of measures to assess individual and environmental factors influencing restaurant customers’ healthy eating behaviors, along with identifying underlying sub-constructs. The reliability and validity of the scale and the factor structure are presented and potential applications and theoretical contributions of the scale are provided as well.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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