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Abstract

Details

Men Writing Eating Disorders: Autobiographical Writing and Illness Experience in English and German Narratives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-920-5

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Sarah Maddock, Sheena Leek and Gordon Foxall

Outlines the numerous messages sent to consumers regarding healthy eating practices and indicates the problems involved in determining whether or not the British consumer…

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Abstract

Outlines the numerous messages sent to consumers regarding healthy eating practices and indicates the problems involved in determining whether or not the British consumer has adopted a nutritious and healthy diet. Research was undertaken which measured individuals’ involvement in healthy eating issues and related this to several demographic characteristics. The research indicates some variation in involvement in healthy eating according to demographic variables but the results were not statistically significant. Group discussions were also conducted which confirmed that the healthy eating messages were widely received and understood; however, there was some confusion over their content, scepticism regarding the veracity and motivation of some sources and a growing resentment of boring and puritanical themes. In the future care must be taken to produce clear, simple and positive healthy eating messages to the public if trends towards a more nutritious diet are to continue.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 99 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 August 2022

Gonzalo Luna-Cortes and José Alejandro Aristizabal Cuellar

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship of masculine eating/drinking beliefs on male consumers’ concern with unhealthy eating/drinking habits and, in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship of masculine eating/drinking beliefs on male consumers’ concern with unhealthy eating/drinking habits and, in turn, with binge drinking. Additionally, this research tests if and how a change in these beliefs influences binge drinking intention and intention to eat unhealthy food.

Design/methodology/approach

Three studies were conducted in Bogotá (Colombian males; convenience sampling). The purpose of Study 1 (N = 209) was to develop a scale to measure masculine eating/drinking beliefs. Study 2 (N = 191) tested the mediating role of concern with unhealthy eating/drinking habits in the relationship of masculine eating/drinking beliefs with binge drinking. Study 3 (N = 179) was an experimental study, which examined the effect of information about some negative consequences of masculine beliefs on the answers to the masculine eating/drinking beliefs inventory and, in turn, on binge drinking intention and intention to eat unhealthy food.

Findings

A one-dimensional (eight-items) scale was developed and validated. The results of this paper show that masculine eating/drinking beliefs are associated with lower concern with unhealthy eating/drinking and, in turn, with higher binge drinking. Information that influences these beliefs leads to lower binge drinking and unhealthy food ingestion intentions.

Research limitations/implications

This research presents the first scale that measures masculine eating/drinking beliefs. It provides initial evidence on how an intervention focused on the negative consequences of sexism can influence these beliefs, affecting binge drinking and overeating intentions.

Practical implications

This research provides new findings on a topic associated with several health problems in many countries, including the effect on consumers’ weight gaining and related illnesses.

Originality/value

This research presents the first scale that measures masculine eating/drinking beliefs. It provides initial evidence about factors (through mediating variables) that link masculine eating/drinking beliefs with some unhealthy eating/drinking habits. In addition, the results show how information about some negative consequences of these beliefs can influence consumers’ binge drinking and unhealthy food ingestion intentions, which leads to key recommendations for future interventions. As a result, this research provides new findings on a topic associated with several health problems in many countries, including the effect on consumers’ weight gaining and related illnesses.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2018

Anthony Papathomas

This chapter describes the disordered eating in sport problem and provides a critical overview of research in the area. It offers specific insights into how cultural…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter describes the disordered eating in sport problem and provides a critical overview of research in the area. It offers specific insights into how cultural practices in elite sport may be implicated.

Approach

In contrast to dominant medical perspectives, disordered eating in sport is discussed as a product of high-performance cultural contexts. The ways that practice commonplace in elite sport might contribute to disordered eating onset and maintenance are described. In turn, I also consider the experiential struggles of athletes with eating disorders and how this relates to dominant discourses in elite sport.

Findings

Elite sport culture, with its emphasis on surveillance, sacrifice, and success, reinforces disordered eating practices. Much of what is conventionally considered disordered eating, can be normalized when situated in the context of high-performance sport. Nevertheless, when functional disordered eating slides into mental illness, the mental toughness ethos works to silence and stigmatize athletes.

Research Implications

Research must broaden its focus to explore how social practices in elite sport normalize disordered eating and how prevention approaches can become more culturally informed and less individually driven.

Details

Sport, Mental Illness, and Sociology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-469-1

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2019

Kerry McGannon

To explore the discursive construction of disordered eating and athlete identity meanings within elite female athlete’s stories. Published athlete autobiographies were…

Abstract

Purpose

To explore the discursive construction of disordered eating and athlete identity meanings within elite female athlete’s stories. Published athlete autobiographies were interrogated as cultural sites of analysis to accomplish this aim.

Approach

A critical social constructionist perspective on disordered eating is outlined along with narrative research findings on female athletes and disordered eating. A discursive psychological approach and critical discourse analysis (CDA) is then discussed to theorize and study meanings of disordered eating and athlete identities/subject positions. Next, the utility of studying two elite female athlete’s autobiographies is outlined followed by examples from a CDA of two athlete stories.

Findings

Two discourses and two identity/subject positions within each are outlined: discourse of performance and the “committed, controlled athlete” and a discourse of personal growth and the “empowered athlete in transition.” The features of each discourse and subject position are outlined and examples from each athlete’s story. The intention is to show the ways in which discursive resources construct the body, food and identities in sport and the implications.

Implications

The chapter is concluded with why studying “disordered eating and body talk” within discourses is useful to expand understanding of constraining and emancipative aspects of athlete identities, struggle and recovery.

Abstract

Details

Men Writing Eating Disorders: Autobiographical Writing and Illness Experience in English and German Narratives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-920-5

Article
Publication date: 12 April 2022

Feride Ayyıldız and Gülşah Şahin

The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between social media addiction and eating behavior, eating disorder risk, body weight and life satisfaction in…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between social media addiction and eating behavior, eating disorder risk, body weight and life satisfaction in university students during pandemic period.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consists of 1,411 university students. Data were collected using online questionnaire and Scale of Social Media Usage Motives, Social Media Addiction Scale-Student Form, Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire (DEBQ), SCOFF Eating Disorders Scale and Life Assessment Scale were used in the study.

Findings

Of the participants, 79.7% had different levels of social media addiction. Body weight and body mass index (BMI) values of those with high social media addiction were significantly higher than those in the non- and low-addicted group (p < 0.05). There was a positive relationship between social media addiction and duration of social media use, social media addiction and emotional and external eating behaviors and a negative relationship between social media addiction and life satisfaction (p < 0.01). There was no significant difference in eating disorder risk according to social media addiction groups (p = 0.823). Individuals in the nonaddicted social media group had the highest Life Assessment Scale score (p < 0.01).

Originality/value

Social media addiction was prevalent among university students, and it was related to BMI, eating behavior and life satisfaction. It is necessary to be more careful in the use of social media, which has increased in the pandemic period. Trainings to reduce the use of social media can positively affect eating behavior and contribute to the prevention of obesity and increasing life satisfaction.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 124 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 29 June 2017

Jane S. VanHeuvelen and Tom VanHeuvelen

Improving the nutritious quality of diets for individuals and populations is a central goal of many public health advocates and intergovernmental organizations. Yet the…

Abstract

Purpose

Improving the nutritious quality of diets for individuals and populations is a central goal of many public health advocates and intergovernmental organizations. Yet the outcome of healthy eating has been shown to systematically vary across individual-level socioeconomic lines, and across countries in different locations of the food system. We therefore assess variation in the association between eating nutritionally dense fresh fruits and vegetables and both self-rated health (SRH) and body mass index (BMI) across individual income and country locations in the food system.

Methodology/approach

We use nationally representative survey data from 31 countries drawn from the International Social Survey Programme’s 2011 Health module. We estimate the effect of the frequency of eating fresh fruits and vegetables using random-intercept, random-coefficient multilevel mixed-effects regression models.

Findings

We confirm that eating nutritionally dense fresh fruits and vegetables frequently associates with more positive health outcomes. However, this general conclusion masks substantial individual- and country-level heterogeneity. For both SRH and BMI, the largest beneficial associations are concentrated among the most affluent individuals in the most affluent countries. Moving away from either reduces the positive association of healthy eating.

Social and practical implications

Our results provide an important wrinkle for policies aimed at changing the nutritional quality of diets. Adjustments to diets without taking into account fundamental causes of socioeconomic status will likely be met with attenuated results.

Originality/value

We compare two important health outcomes across a wide variety of types of countries. We demonstrate that our main conclusions are only detectable when employing a flexible multilevel methodological design.

Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2016

Antonella Samoggia, Aldo Bertazzoli, Vaiva Hendrixson, Maria Glibetic and Anne Arvola

The purpose of the chapter is to explore the relation between women’s healthy eating intention and food attitudes, beliefs, perceptions, and barriers with a focus on the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the chapter is to explore the relation between women’s healthy eating intention and food attitudes, beliefs, perceptions, and barriers with a focus on the effect of women’s income differences.

Methodology/approach

The research applies the Theory of Planned Behavior, including attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, perceived barriers, and ability opportunity resources. Close-ended survey responses of 704 women between ages 25 and 65 years, affluent and at-risk-of-poverty women in three EU-member countries were analyzed.

Findings

Women are mostly positively inclined towards healthy eating, and income does not differentiate women’s inclination. Influencing factors are perceived behavioral control, attitudes towards healthy eating, subjective norms, and level of knowledge regarding healthy food. Barriers, when present, are similar for lower or higher income women and relate to routinized family habits and food affordability and availability.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should thoroughly investigate family network and structure features, with a focus on family food preferences and habits.

Social and practical implications

Encouraging women’s healthy behavior also impacts children and men, and vice-versa. There is need to target all family components with enjoyable, self-rewarding, emotionally gratifying, and pleasant tasting food.

Originality/value

Income is an overestimated driver in healthy food choices. Women are strongly influenced by personal and environmental factors, mainly personal control, feelings, and family habits.

Details

Gender and Food: From Production to Consumption and After
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-054-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 March 2022

Constantinos-Vasilios Priporas, Durga Vellore-Nagarajan and Irene (Eirini) Kamenidou

This study aims to delineate the phenomenon of stressful eating within generation Z due to the times they are living in and to extract propositions which elucidate phases…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to delineate the phenomenon of stressful eating within generation Z due to the times they are living in and to extract propositions which elucidate phases of stressful eating within Zers.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on relevant literature on consumer obesity, theories of pure impulse buying and reasoned action, cognitive constructs eminent for reasoned conditioned behaviour are extracted. Followed by extraction of the reasoned conditioned behaviour and its cognitive constructs within Zers. Thereafter, a conceptual framework is developed with propositions of stressful eating within Zers.

Findings

Zers indulge in reasoned conditioned behaviour initially owing to their healthy understanding insights, and the activations of cognitive capacities within them due to the law of effect. The law of effect is cyclical after the first reasoned consumption among Zers, leading to obesity and constricting self-controlling behaviour.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study that provides a deep understanding of the cognitive mechanism orienting generation Z’s stressful eating indulgence even though they have higher healthy lifestyle understandings.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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