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Article
Publication date: 23 June 2021

Mark Newey

The purpose of this paper is to discuss why mental health education in the workplace is vital. The paper aims to give HR managers and directors an understanding of mental…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss why mental health education in the workplace is vital. The paper aims to give HR managers and directors an understanding of mental health education and advice on how to imbed a culture of mental health well-being into the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

The feature identifies the issues faced in the UK’s workplace with mental health issues, such as stress, anxiety and depression. The research identifies much desktop research, as well as authors 20+ plus years’ experience of work, in the field as a qualified psychotherapist. The paper also addresses latest research that suggests employees are happier to turn to technology rather than human contact to address their mental health concerns. The feature was drafted during the Covid-19 pandemic when mental health issues were recorded at an all-time high.

Findings

Mental Health has become a major issue within the workplace, and much work has taken place to rid stigma of mental health issues. It is essential that industry embed mental health education into their organisations to create healthy futures for all. Employees want their organisations to offer support, preferably in an online, always available, service.

Originality/value

Although there’s much discussion and awareness of mental health issues, mental health education is rarely understood.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2021

Aizhan Tursunbayeva

COVID-19 has been a big reset to human resource (HR) processes. Organizations’ HR functions around the world have been working hard to effect a response that falls under…

Abstract

Purpose

COVID-19 has been a big reset to human resource (HR) processes. Organizations’ HR functions around the world have been working hard to effect a response that falls under four main headings: jobs and work continuity; physical health and well-being; need for mental health, resilience, family support and dealing with uncertainty; and remote work. Knowledge of whether and how these responses have been adopted by health organizations or their potential impact is scarce.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper discusses some of the HR strategies adopted or recommended for adoption by health systems/organizations with specific reference to the aforementioned HR response categories.

Findings

The evidence available illustrates that the HR responses adopted by health organizations are mostly in line with those adopted by organizations from other sectors, though not without some variances. The findings also suggest that COVID has acted as a “technological catalyst” for HR practices in health organizations.

Research limitations/implications

The background readings that informed this study also helped to identify some literature gaps that could be addressed by future research and practice.

Practical implications

The state of the art presented in this paper may be of value to health leaders and health HR managers in further strengthening their responses to both pre-existing and post-COVID people-related challenges.

Originality/value

This work is timely considering existing literature gaps and the fact that the existing evidence gets outdated quickly as the emergency progresses.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2021

Marc Richard Hugh Kosciejew

Introducing immunity or vaccine passports is one non-pharmaceutical intervention that governments are considering to exempt immune, vaccinated or otherwise risk-free…

Abstract

Purpose

Introducing immunity or vaccine passports is one non-pharmaceutical intervention that governments are considering to exempt immune, vaccinated or otherwise risk-free individuals from lockdowns and other public health restrictions during the coronavirus pandemic. The primary objective of these documents would be to begin reopening societies, restarting economies and returning to a pre-pandemic normalcy. This article aims to present the start of a conceptual documentary analysis of (proposed and existing) COVID-19 immunity passports in order to more fully center their documentary status within research, considerations and conversations about their potential roles, impacts and implications.

Design/methodology/approach

Inspired by Paula A. Treichler's argument for the importance of theoretical thought for untangling the socio-cultural phenomena of epidemics, and drawing upon interdisciplinary theories of documentation, identity and public health, combined with recent news coverage of the coronavirus pandemic, this article provides a contemporary overview and conceptual analysis of emerging documentary regimes of COVID-19 immunity verification involving immunity or vaccine passports.

Findings

Three major interconnected objectives could be fulfilled by immunity passports. First, they would establish and materialize an official identity of COVID-19 immune for people possessing the formal document. Second, they would serve as material evidence establishing and verifying individuals' immunity, vaccination or risk-free status from the coronavirus that would, in term, determine and regulate their movements and other privileges. Third, they would create tangible links between individuals and governments' official or recognized identity category of COVID-19 immune. Immunity passports would, therefore, help enable and enforce governmental authority and power by situating individuals within documentary regimes of COVID-19 immunity verification.

Research limitations/implications

In the expanding interdisciplinary literature on COVID-19 immunity passports, sometimes also called certificates, licenses, or passes, there appears to be only minimal reference to their documentary instantiations, whether physical, digital, and/or hybrid documents. As yet, there is not any specific documentary approach to or analysis of immunity passports as kinds of documentation. A documentary approach helps to illuminate and emphasize the materiality of and ontological considerations concerning the coronavirus pandemic and its associated kinds of immunity or vaccination.

Social implications

By beginning an exploration of what makes immunity passports thinkable as a public health response to the coronavirus pandemic, this article illuminates these health and identity documents' material implications for, and effects on, individuals and societies. This article, therefore, helps shed light on what immunity passports reveal about the complicated and contested intersections of identity, documentation, public health and socio-political control and discipline.

Originality/value

This article contributes the start of a documentary analysis of (proposed and existing) COVID-19 immunity passports in order to more fully center their documentary status within research and conversations about them.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 July 2021

Kjersti Berge Evensen, Vibeke Hervik Bull and Linda Ness

Prisoners have poorer oral health than the general population. Good oral health is essential for both social and physical well-being. For prisoners, poor oral health is…

Abstract

Purpose

Prisoners have poorer oral health than the general population. Good oral health is essential for both social and physical well-being. For prisoners, poor oral health is also related to drug use after release, whereas good oral health is related to successful reintegration into society. The purpose of this study was twofold: to examine the effect of an intervention based on motivational interviewing (MI) on prisoners’ oral health-related behavior and to assess if the intervention is a good fit for this population.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 16 prisoners in a Norwegian prison were offered a brief MI-based intervention focusing on changing their oral health-related behavior. An oral examination was also performed and the prisoners received a small package containing oral hygiene aids. Two weeks later, a second oral examination and a semi-structured interview were conducted to explore the effect of the intervention and examine the prisoners’ responses to the intervention. Qualitative data analyzes were guided by thematic analysis.

Findings

The findings indicate that the intervention had positive effects on both the prisoners’ motivation to use oral health-related behavior and their performance of oral health-related behavior. The findings also indicate that the intervention was well adapted to the target population.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies that explore the effect of an intervention in improving prisoners’ oral health and bridges a knowledge gap in the literature. The findings may increase the understanding of how dental services should be organized and offered to provide dental health care to this vulnerable group.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Parvathy M.L. and Hemalatha K.

Sustainable development goals (SDGs) recognize the importance and interrelation between health and migration. Women migration and health is well researched, yet less…

Abstract

Purpose

Sustainable development goals (SDGs) recognize the importance and interrelation between health and migration. Women migration and health is well researched, yet less attention is paid to their healthcare utilization, especially with regard to overall health and well-being. This paper aims to highlight the gap in the existing literature on health care utilization by women migrants.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review was carried out following the PRISMA guideline. For the review, the literature was taken from three electronic databases, which were Springer Link, Taylor and Francis and PubMed. From a total of 1,575 studies, seven studies cleared the eligibility screening.

Findings

Of seven studies, five were found to focus on the sexual and reproductive health of the women migrants than their general health and well-being, and less attention is paid to health promotion and illness prevention beyond reproductive and sexual health. While, studies on general health have focused on the influence of health status on health care utilization and the influence of health insurance in health care utilization. The review has revealed the disparities faced by migrant women in different countries while seeking health care.

Originality/value

Studies on women migration and health care utilization have largely focused on the reproductive and sexual health needs of women, and this overemphasis often undermines their accessibility and affordability to overall health and well-being. Therefore, the present study has moved away from the concept of sexual and reproductive health tot that of overall health and well-being of women migrants.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Liisa Jaakkimainen, Imaan Bayoumi, Richard H. Glazier, Kamila Premji, Tara Kiran, Shahriar Khan, Eliot Frymire and Michael E. Green

The authors developed and validated an algorithm using health administrative data to identify patients who are attached or uncertainly attached to a primary care provider…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors developed and validated an algorithm using health administrative data to identify patients who are attached or uncertainly attached to a primary care provider (PCP) using patient responses to a survey conducted in Ontario, Canada.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a validation study using as a reference standard respondents to a community-based survey who indicated they did or did not have a PCP. The authors developed and tested health administrative algorithms against this reference standard. The authors calculated the sensitivity, specificity positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) on the final patient attachment algorithm. The authors then applied the attachment algorithm to the 2017 Ontario population.

Findings

The patient attachment algorithm had an excellent sensitivity (90.5%) and PPV (96.8%), though modest specificity (46.1%) and a low NPV (21.3%). This means that the algorithm assigned survey respondents as being attached to a PCP and when in fact they said they had a PCP, yet a significant proportion of those found to be uncertainly attached had indicated they did have a PCP. In 2017, most people in Ontario, Canada (85.4%) were attached to a PCP but 14.6% were uncertainly attached.

Research limitations/implications

Administrative data for nurse practitioner's encounters and other interprofessional care providers are not currently available. The authors also cannot separately identify primary care visits conducted in walk in clinics using our health administrative data. Finally, the definition of hospital-based healthcare use did not include outpatient specialty care.

Practical implications

Uncertain attachment to a primary health care provider is a recurrent problem that results in inequitable access in health services delivery. Providing annual reports on uncertainly attached patients can help evaluate primary care system changes developed to improve access. This algorithm can be used by health care planners and policy makers to examine the geographic variability and time trends of the uncertainly attached population to inform the development of programs to improve primary care access.

Social implications

As primary care is an essential component of a person's medical home, identifying regions or high need populations that have higher levels of uncertainly attached patients will help target programs to support their primary care access and needs. Furthermore, this approach will be useful in future research to determine the health impacts of uncertain attachment to primary care, especially in view of a growing body of the literature highlighting the importance of primary care continuity.

Originality/value

This patient attachment algorithm is the first to use existing health administrative data validated with responses from a patient survey. Using patient surveys alone to assess attachment levels is expensive and time consuming to complete. They can also be subject to poor response rates and recall bias. Utilizing existing health administrative data provides more accurate, timely estimates of patient attachment for everyone in the population.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2021

Mark J. Avery, Allan W. Cripps and Gary D. Rogers

This study explores key governance, leadership and management activities that have impact on quality, risk and safety within Australian healthcare organisations.

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores key governance, leadership and management activities that have impact on quality, risk and safety within Australian healthcare organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

Current non-executive directors (n = 12) of public and private health boards were interviewed about contemporary approaches to fiduciary and corporate responsibilities for quality assurance and improvement outcomes in the context of risk and safety management for patient care. Verbatim transcripts were subjected to thematic analysis triangulated with Leximancer-based text mining.

Findings

Boards operate in a strong legislative, healthcare standards and normative environment of quality and risk management. Support and influence that create a positive quality and risk management culture within the organisation, actions that disseminate quality and risk broadly and at depth for all levels, and implementation and sustained development of quality and risk systems that report on and contain risk were critical tasks for boards and their directors.

Practical implications

Findings from this study may provide health directors with key quality and risk management agenda points to expand or deepen the impact of governance around health facilities' quality and risk management.

Originality/value

This study has identified key governance activities and responsibilities where boards demonstrate that they add value in terms of potential improvement to hospital and health service quality care outcomes. The demonstrable influence identified makes an important contribution to our understanding of healthcare governance.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

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Book part
Publication date: 3 November 2005

Valda Ford and Beth Furlong

Health promotion programs in global health systems need to incorporate culturally competent care and provide linguistic access. This article describes the challenges in…

Abstract

Health promotion programs in global health systems need to incorporate culturally competent care and provide linguistic access. This article describes the challenges in one country, the United States, and reports on research studies, which articulate the current gaps in meeting the above goals. Health care providers are bound by both legal and ethical standards to provide such care. Legal standards are cited. Regardless of legal standards, health care providers are also bound ethically to provide such care. An analysis of basic ethical concepts of principalism is described for the importance of these aspects of care.

The premise of this article is that one cannot have a successful health system without inclusion of culturally competent health promotion programs. And, one cannot have such health promotion programs without an understanding of the role that cultural and linguistic competence plays in the provision of clinically competent and cost-effective services. Not only is there a need for culturally competent care that is legally mandated in some countries, such care is ethically necessary. The first part of this paper will address the need for culturally and linguistically appropriate care and applicable laws and standards. The latter part of the paper will provide an ethical analysis. However, before doing that, one global perspective of health care concerns for underserved populations will be presented as well as a discussion of the importance of the use of ethical frameworks.

Details

Health Care Services, Racial and Ethnic Minorities and Underserved Populations: Patient and Provider Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-249-8

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Book part
Publication date: 7 December 2011

Barbara Wejnert

Three important lessons can be drawn from the health situation in developing and democratizing world. First lesson is that the societal health does not occur in the vacuum…

Abstract

Three important lessons can be drawn from the health situation in developing and democratizing world. First lesson is that the societal health does not occur in the vacuum of societal life or social structures, but it simultaneously inspires development of all major spheres of political, economic, and cultural life of society. Second, health policy transpires simultaneously in all major social institutions, including economy, political institutions, and culture. Furthermore, because all social institutions are interconnected, the initiation of health reforms causes enormous, multilevel changes in all social strata and affects the performance of all essential institutions. Third, according to the World Health Organization, health is considered an integral part of human security, human rights, and peace. Consequently, societal health is determined and depends on the fullest cooperation of governments, world-scale communities, and local health care providers.

Details

Democracies: Challenges to Societal Health
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-238-8

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2021

Tuotuo Qi, Tianmei Wang and Jiarui Yan

Understanding health experts' online free knowledge contribution behavior is vital for promoting health knowledge and improving health literacy. This study focuses on the…

Abstract

Purpose

Understanding health experts' online free knowledge contribution behavior is vital for promoting health knowledge and improving health literacy. This study focuses on the spillover effects of different monetary incentive levels on health experts' free knowledge contribution behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

In 2016, Zhihu Live and Zhi Hu were launched as two types of paid knowledge products on Zhihu.com, a hybrid knowledge exchange platform. Focusing on the policy impact of launching Zhihu Live and Zhi Hu, this study uses the difference-in-differences model to analyze the heterogeneous spillover effects of high-yield and low-yield monetary incentives on health experts' free knowledge contribution behavior.

Findings

In the short term, the high-yield monetary incentive has positive spillover effects on the quantity and quality of free knowledge contribution while the low-yield monetary incentive generates opposite effects. In the long term, the effects of the high-yield monetary incentive remain significantly positive. The effect of the low-yield monetary incentive on the quantity of free knowledge contribution remains significantly negative, but its effect on the quality of free knowledge contribution is not significant.

Originality/value

This study combines theories of reciprocity and resource limitation to study the spillover effects of different monetary incentive levels on health experts' online behavior. The short-term and long-term effects of different monetary incentive levels on health experts' online behavior are also explored.

Details

Internet Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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