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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2021

Yoonah Kim Conoly, Mike von Massow and Yee Ming Lee

This study aims to investigate how domestic and international undergraduate students from a university in Ontario, Canada, defined locally grown food and examined the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how domestic and international undergraduate students from a university in Ontario, Canada, defined locally grown food and examined the factors behind their locally grown food purchase intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were distributed in the School of Hospitality, Food, and Tourism Management undergraduate classes. A total of 196 complete surveys were returned. Using multiple regression analysis and theory of planned behavior (TPB) as a theoretical framework with an additional construct, moral norm, proposed hypotheses were tested.

Findings

Domestic students narrowly defined locally grown food based on distance (e.g. food grown/raised within 100 km of where a person lives) compared to international students (e.g. food grown in Canada). The multiple regression analysis revealed that 36% of variance in purchase intention is explained by the four independent variables (i.e. student status, attitude, perceived product availability and moral norm), with perceived product availability as the strongest predictor of intention to purchase locally grown food.

Research limitations/implications

The convenience sampling method limitations are as follows. First, the sample size was small for international students. Second, there was a possibility of underrepresentation of certain origins of international student populations. Third, the undergraduate respondents were from the School of Hospitality, Food and Tourism. Finally, another limitation is that the four variables in this study (i.e. attitudes, subjective norms, perceived product availability, and moral norm) only explained 36% of the variance of this model.

Practical implications

Perceived product availability, moral norm and attitude constructs positively influenced the locally grown food purchase intention. A perceived product availability construct revealed the strongest influence in locally grown food purchase intention of students. Particularly, five key questions were created based on the major research findings of this study, which can be used as a guideline for locally grown food providers and farmers when promoting locally grown food to students. These questions include: Where can I find it? When can I find it? Who grows it? How can I benefit others? Why is it good for me?

Social implications

The results of this study shown that which factors influence locally grown food purchase intention of students. Hence, local restaurateurs and university dining facilities may incorporate these factors in their marketing message to serve students population better who might be interested in buying food products using locally grown ingredients. Research results also allow local farmers to communicate and inform their current and potential student consumers about the advantages of locally grown food. Overall, findings can contribute to economy and business of local community.

Originality/value

Current research findings verified that there is a significant use of a moral norm construct to predict locally grown food purchase intention of students. The moral norm construct positively influenced the locally grown food purchase intention in this study, and this construct seemed useful to predict locally grown food purchase intention of students. Additionally, the research discovered that there were differences in domestic and international undergraduate students' perception in the locally grown food definition.

Details

International Hospitality Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-8142

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2021

Muhammad Shehzad Hanif, Min Wang, Muhammad Usman Mumtaz, Zeeshan Ahmed and Waqas Zaki

Acceptance and use of mobile shopping as the preferred shopping medium is becoming the new normal today. The proliferation of mobile shopping practices follows unsteady…

Abstract

Purpose

Acceptance and use of mobile shopping as the preferred shopping medium is becoming the new normal today. The proliferation of mobile shopping practices follows unsteady growth patterns in different countries. Despite challenges of price, quality and privacy matters, young consumers still lead the race to engage in mobile shopping activity in developing countries. This research investigates the determinants that either support or hinder the mobile shopping intentions of aspirant young consumers in Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

The present research applies a consumer-centric approach to the technology adoption framework to unearth the behavioral patterns of these young consumers in Pakistan. Employing the structural equation modeling technique, this research examines the significant effect of structural assurance, perceived risk, trust and various unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) model constructs on behavioral intention to engage in mobile shopping.

Findings

This research examines the significant effect of structural assurance, perceived risk, trust and various UTAUT model constructs on behavioral intention to engage in mobile shopping. Results also demonstrate a significant moderating effect of structural assurance and prior shopping experience on the relationship between perceived risk, trust and mobile shopping intentions. Further, the mobile shopping patterns for the male and female segment indicate a significant difference for perceived risk, trust structural assurance and social influence. The research contributes to the growing body of knowledge which advocates the application of consumer-centric customized model approach to explore various factors that either facilitate or impede the adoption of mobile shopping in a developing economy.

Research limitations/implications

The study validates the need to enforce structural assurance mechanism for facilitating mobile shopping in a developing country. It also offers practical implications for online businesses and marketers striving to attract and retain more mobile customers.

Practical implications

The study offers practical implications for online businesses and marketers striving to attract and retain more mobile customers.

Originality/value

This study offers fresh insights about driving elements and impediments of mobile shopping behavioral intentions. Structural assurance and prior shopping experience appear to influence the mobile shopping behavior through direct and indirect effect.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2021

Cong Doanh Duong

The purpose of this research is to integrate the prediction from entrepreneurship education with the theory of planned behaviors (TPB) to build a conceptual framework and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to integrate the prediction from entrepreneurship education with the theory of planned behaviors (TPB) to build a conceptual framework and estimate the effect of entrepreneurship education on entrepreneurial intention over and above key predictors from an extended TPB model. Also, the moderating impacts of educational fields in the paths from entrepreneurial education, attitude toward entrepreneurship, subjective norms and perceived behavioral control to entrepreneurial intention are tested in this study.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a sample of 559 university students who received entrepreneurship education at 12 universities from Vietnam. Confirmatory factor analysis was utilized to test the validity and reliability of all variables and regression analyses were used to estimate coefficient paths. Then, bootstrapping method with the PROCESS approach was utilized to test the indirect correlations.

Findings

The study reveals that attitude toward entrepreneurship and perceived behavioral control were positively and strongly associated with entrepreneurial intention, while the linkage between subjective norms and entrepreneurial intention was not significant. Also, the findings show that even though entrepreneurship education did not have a direct effect on entrepreneurial intention, it increased entrepreneurial intention via attitude toward entrepreneurship and perceived behavioral control. In addition, this study finds that educational fields moderate the associations between predictors and entrepreneurial intention.

Practical implications

This study offers both universities and policymakers options to foster youths' entrepreneurial activities.

Originality/value

This study is expected to significantly contribute to entrepreneurship literature by enriching our understanding of the interesting and crucial linkages between entrepreneurship education, attitude toward entrepreneurship, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control and entrepreneurial intention. Additionally, the current research reveals that for economic and business management students, the paths are driven from entrepreneurial education, attitude toward entrepreneurship, subjective norms and perceived behavioral control to intention to engage in entrepreneurial activities has become stronger when compared to students of majors in engineering and others.

Details

Education + Training, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2021

Fan Yu and Ran Zheng

Nowadays, more and more Chinese consumers purchase luxury goods on live streaming platforms. However, the existing literature rarely focuses on this emerging phenomenon…

Abstract

Purpose

Nowadays, more and more Chinese consumers purchase luxury goods on live streaming platforms. However, the existing literature rarely focuses on this emerging phenomenon. This article attempts to construct a theoretical model based on the perceived value theory to explain this phenomenon.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 354 online questionnaires are collected, and the partial least square structural equation model is used to analyze the model empirically.

Findings

The results show that consumers' perceived luxury values (financial value, functional value, individual value and social value) have a significant and positive effect on customer engagement, which further leads to purchase intention.

Originality/value

In view of fact that there is a big difference between luxury goods and nonluxury goods, yet the existing literature rarely distinguishes between luxury goods and nonluxury goods in the context of live streaming shopping, this article attempts to use perceived value theory to examine consumers' luxury purchase intentions in live streaming shopping and explores whether customer engagement is a mediating mechanism of perceived luxury values that influences purchase intention in live streaming.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2021

Carolyn Jia’En Lo, Yelena Tsarenko and Dewi Tojib

Corporate scandals involving senior executives plague many businesses. Although customers and noncustomers may be exposed to news of the same scandal, they may appraise…

Abstract

Purpose

Corporate scandals involving senior executives plague many businesses. Although customers and noncustomers may be exposed to news of the same scandal, they may appraise dimensions of the transgression differently, thereby affecting post-scandal patronage intentions. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether and how consumer-firm affiliation affects future patronage intentions by examining nuances in customers’ vs noncustomers’ reactions toward the transgressor’s professional performance and immoral behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Four between-subjects experimental studies were used to test whether performance-relevant and/or immorality-relevant pathways drive customers’ vs noncustomers’ post-scandal patronage intentions. The results were analyzed using analysis of variance, parallel mediation and serial mediation.

Findings

The results demonstrate that performance judgment, and not immorality judgment, drive the relationship between consumer-firm affiliation and post-scandal patronage intentions (Study 1a), regardless of the order of information presented (Study 1b). Customers form more positive performance judgments because they give more weight to performance-related information (Study 2), demonstrating a sequential effect of consumer-firm affiliation on post-scandal patronage intentions only through the performance-relevant, and not immorality-relevant, pathway (Study 3).

Research limitations/implications

This research contributes to the literature on social distance and moral judgments. Future research should examine other deleterious outcomes such as brand sabotage and negative word-of-mouth, as well as potential moderators including repeated transgressions and prevalence of the infraction in other firms.

Practical implications

This research offers important nuances for understanding how performance and immorality judgments differentially operate and affect post-scandal patronage intentions. The findings highlight the strategic value of communicating the leader’s performance (e.g. professional contributions) as a buffer against potential declining patronage.

Originality/value

Offering new insights into the extant literature and lay beliefs which contend that harsh moral judgment reduces patronage intentions, this research uncovers why and how exposure to the same scandal can result in varying moral judgments that subsequently influence patronage intentions. Importantly, this research shows that the performance-relevant pathway can explain why customers have higher post-scandal patronage intentions compared to noncustomers.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2021

Maomao Chi, Junjing Wang, Xin (Robert) Luo and Han Li

Drawing on and extending the push-pull-mooring (PPM) framework, this paper aims to empirically explore the influencing mechanism of traveler switching intention from the…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on and extending the push-pull-mooring (PPM) framework, this paper aims to empirically explore the influencing mechanism of traveler switching intention from the hotel reservation platforms to the sharing accommodation platforms (SAPs).

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts structural equation modeling to analyze the 543 responses collected among hotel reservation platforms and SAPs travelers.

Findings

The results support the positive effect of both push factors (e.g. dissatisfaction with product, service and information quality of hotels on the hotel reservation platform) and pull factors (e.g. price value, authenticity, interaction, home benefits and novelty of SAPs) on traveler switching intention. Except for the negative effect of switching cost, other mooring factors including prior switching experience and social influence positively affect traveler switching intention. The authors also found the switching cost negatively and prior switching experience positively moderated the push effects on traveler switching intention, while the social influence positively moderated the pull effects on traveler switching intention.

Research limitations/implications

Recommendations of future SAP participation research to consider the competing platforms, the unique experiences of SAPs and mooring factors. Examining the factors of different sources is also useful for practitioners to better understand travelers’ demands and to improve the overall welfare of travelers.

Originality/value

This paper embraces an extended PPM framework to explore traveler switching intention in online travel platforms. Moreover, this paper provides unique insights into the switching behavior from the hotel reservation platforms to the SAPs.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2021

Dung Phuong Hoang, Ngoc Thang Doan and Thi Cam Thuy Nguyen

Upgrading in global value chains (GVCs) has become a crucial strategy for enhancing competitive advantage and attaining higher profitability, especially among firms in…

Abstract

Purpose

Upgrading in global value chains (GVCs) has become a crucial strategy for enhancing competitive advantage and attaining higher profitability, especially among firms in developing countries. Drawn from the sociological approach, this study treats GVC upgrading as an entrepreneurial act and examines factors affecting firms' intention to move up in their chains based on the theory of planned behavior. The authors also further test the moderating effects of firms' knowledge about rule of origin and governmental supports on the intention-behavior gap.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth interviews with eight Vietnamese business managers were implemented to support the development of hypotheses and measurement scales. Afterwards, the authors conducted a survey on decision-makers of 402 Vietnamese firms which currently have export-import activities to collect quantitative data for testing the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

The empirical results indicate that both attitudes, behavioral control and social norms have significant positive impacts on the intention to upgrade in GVCs. In turn, such intention could further activate actual behaviors to move up in their chains. However, those who have better knowledge about rule of origin and receive governmental supports either in terms of finance, credit or technology have a higher probability of demonstrating actual behavior to upgrade in GVCs once their intentions are formed than those who do not.

Practical implications

This research provides valuable implications for policymakers in accelerating firms' actions to upgrade within their chains, hence, actively enhancing not only organizational performance but also significantly contributes to the national economic development.

Originality/value

While most of the previous studies examine the preconditions for firms to participate and upgrade in their GVCs, there is limited attention on determinants of firms' own intention and actual behavior to upgrade in their chains once they have participated in the GVC. Specifically, this research not only contributes to the existing knowledge regarding factors affecting firms' intention to upgrade in their chains but also closes the gap between the intention and the actual GVC upgrading behavior.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 October 2021

Olena Mykolenko, Inna Ippolitova, Hanna Doroshenko and Svitlana Strapchuk

The purpose of the research is to test empirically whether the variables of personal attitudes towards entrepreneurship and perceived control mediate the relationship…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the research is to test empirically whether the variables of personal attitudes towards entrepreneurship and perceived control mediate the relationship between entrepreneurship education and intentions of Ukrainian students to become entrepreneurs; to determine whether personal attitudes mediate the relationship between cultural context and entrepreneurial intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

The research project carried out jointly by four Kharkiv universities used 349 survey responses from senior students majoring in business and economics and management and marketing. The data was analysed using Partial Least Squares regression.

Findings

Education and employed teaching methods, in particular, positively affect students' attitudes towards entrepreneurship, their perceived capability to start a business and indirectly influence entrepreneurial intentions. However, attendance of entrepreneurship-related courses itself does not enhance perceived control and has no significant effect on personal attitudes. The study also shows that cultural context has a positive influence on students' attitudes towards entrepreneurship and, therefore, indirectly impacts their intentions to become entrepreneurs.

Research limitations/implications

Firstly, the students participating in the study were from one country. And secondly, the paper deals with pre-educational entrepreneurial intentions.

Practical implications

The study suggests that a practice-based approach to entrepreneurship education is a key to raising entrepreneurial awareness of young people in countries whose national cultures are built on collectivist values.

Originality/value

The results of the study are of value for teaching staff, who can actually influence students' entrepreneurial self-awareness, and for university management in the context of contemporary education reforms and the latest requirements to education process.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2021

Geeta Marmat

The purpose of this paper is to understand business students' intention to behave ethically in general, and in particularly in the business context of a developing country, India.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand business students' intention to behave ethically in general, and in particularly in the business context of a developing country, India.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper surveyed 250 final semester MBA students from different business schools in Indore city of Madhya Pradesh in India. The study employed the most popular behavioural theory, the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) to understand the intention of business students to behave ethically. Structural equation modelling was used to analyse direct effects of the constructs on behavioural intention, and the overall model.

Findings

Findings revealed that attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioural control are positively related and have strong influence on ethical behavioural intention of business students. All constructs together explain 67 percent variance in intention. Attitude alone contributes 46 percent in explaining variance in ethical behavioural intention.

Research limitations/implications

Business ethics field can benefit from this study as it provides an empirical explanation of the contribution of each factor that is, attitude, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control, in ethical behavioural intention of business students. This is directly beneficial for business schools and for education policymakers as the information can help policymakers to understand the potential of existing business ethics education. This study is limited to a data set of 250 business students in the context of a single country which cannot be generalized. So, there is need for research of this type in a more collaborative international context.

Originality/value

To the best of my knowledge, this is the first study in the Indian context to predict the intention of business students to behave ethically, using the TPB model. This study contributes valuable knowledge to the domain of business ethics, behavioural studies as well the field of business education, and suggests to explore ways to strengthen the three constructs attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioural control, as these constructs were found to have a strong influence in forming ethical behavioural intention of business students of business schools in India.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2021

Yung-Ming Cheng

The purpose of this study is to propose an integrated post-adoption model based on expectation-confirmation model (ECM) and flow theory to examine whether gamification and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to propose an integrated post-adoption model based on expectation-confirmation model (ECM) and flow theory to examine whether gamification and interface design aesthetics as antecedents to students' beliefs can affect their continuance intention of massive open online courses (MOOCs) and perceived impact on learning.

Design/methodology/approach

Sample data for this study were collected from students enrolled in a comprehensive university in Taiwan. A total of 600 questionnaires were distributed in the campus, and 318 (53.0%) useable questionnaires were analyzed using structural equation modeling in this study.

Findings

This study's results verified that students' perceived gamification and interface design aesthetics of MOOCs positively affected their perceived usefulness, confirmation and flow experience elicited by MOOCs, and these in turn directly or indirectly led to their satisfaction, continuance intention of MOOCs and perceived impact on learning. Essentially, the results strongly support the research model with all hypothesized links being significant.

Originality/value

It should be particularly noticed that this study contributes to the application of capturing both ECM and flow experience (i.e. an intrinsic motivator) for completely explaining students' perceived gamification and interface design aesthetics as external variables to their continuance intention of MOOCs and perceived impact on learning, and this study's empirical evidence can further shed light on the possible formulation of MOOCs success.

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