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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2011

Peter Bullen and Peter Love

Adaptive re‐use enables a building to suit new conditions. It is a process that reaps the benefit of the embodied energy and quality of the original building in a…

Abstract

Purpose

Adaptive re‐use enables a building to suit new conditions. It is a process that reaps the benefit of the embodied energy and quality of the original building in a sustainable manner. Initiatives to improve the sustainability of buildings have tended to focus on new construction projects rather than existing ones. One reason is the tendency to regard old buildings as products with a limited useful life that have to be eventually discarded and demolished. Much of the existing building stock will still be in use for another 100 years. Thus, there is a need to develop policy and strategies that encourage adaptive re‐use and the ongoing sustainability of building stock. The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive review of the factors influencing the decision to adopt an adaptive re‐use strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

Adaptive re‐use is beginning to receive attention, yet there is a lack of consensus as to whether it is an appropriate strategy for meeting the changing needs and demands of developers, occupiers and owners for existing building stock. Considering the limited published research on adaptive re‐use in buildings, particularly in the context of sustainability, a comprehensive review of the normative literature is undertaken to determine the factors influencing the decision‐making process for its use.

Findings

It is revealed that the major drivers for adaptive focus on lifecycle issues, changing perceptions of buildings, and governmental incentives. The barriers to re‐use, on the other hand, include a perception of increased maintenance costs, building regulations, inertia of development criteria and the inherent risk and uncertainty associated with older building stock. The identification of drivers and barriers has enabled a balanced view of the adaptive re‐use debate to be presented.

Research limitations/implications

The paper concludes that more empirical research is required to examine the role of adaptive re‐use in the context of its contribution to sustainability if it is to become an effective strategy that drives the formulation of public policy for addressing the issues associated with existing building stock.

Practical implications

The research identifies key adaptive re‐use issues that need to be addressed by policy makers, developers and owners during the formative stages of the design process so that efforts toward sustainability can be ameliorated. Addressing a building's adaptive re‐use will significantly reduce whole life costs, waste and lead to the improved building functionality.

Originality/value

This paper provides policy makers and key decision makers with the underlying factors that need to be considered when implementing an adaptive re‐use policy as part of their sustainability strategy.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Nadeeshani Wanigarathna, Fred Sherratt, Andrew Price and Simon Austin

The re-use of good design solutions is a key source of evidence and knowledge in the design of healthcare buildings. However, due to the unique nature of healthcare built…

Abstract

Purpose

The re-use of good design solutions is a key source of evidence and knowledge in the design of healthcare buildings. However, due to the unique nature of healthcare built environments, the critical application of this evidence is of paramount importance. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the features of such critical application and identify the aspects that need to be considered during the re-use of good designs.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from three case studies of hospital designs in the UK were used to explore the processes behind the adaption and re-use of design solutions during the design of healthcare buildings. Data were thematically analysed to distinguish the aspects that should be carefully compared and contrasted during design re-use.

Findings

Existing designs of healthcare buildings should be captured and evaluated along with: patient demographics, care models of the hospital, other local departmental needs and facility operational aspects in order to ensure the effectiveness of re-use. In addition, properly introducing the design to the users is also a part of successful design re-use.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this research were integrated into a framework to support healthcare designers on the effective re-use of good designs. This data-driven framework could be validated further with design practitioners. Further, this research relied on memory recall of the interviewees and the accuracy and completeness of documentary records.

Practical implications

This research provides details of how healthcare built environment designs are embedded in project-unique circumstances. The results could therefore be used to develop meaningful and informative evaluation mechanisms for new and re-used healthcare building design features.

Originality/value

This research extends the understanding of the critical application of healthcare design evidence, by explaining how healthcare design solutions should be evaluated during the design process.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Kristy Dyson, Jane Matthews and Peter E.D. Love

The loss of heritage buildings should be avoided as they provide a tangible example of a period of life that is now gone. Adaptive re-use enables buildings to be given a…

Abstract

Purpose

The loss of heritage buildings should be avoided as they provide a tangible example of a period of life that is now gone. Adaptive re-use enables buildings to be given a second life, enabling them to live on when they may have been previously underutilized. Changing the capacity, function or performance of underutilized buildings for a different purpose, or to suit new conditions, or making use of pre-existing structural elements has become necessary to preserve heritage buildings. The purpose of this paper is to identify the critical success factors (CSF) for the adaptive re-use of heritage buildings.

Design/methodology/approach

Identification of CSF for adaptive re-use can provide asset owners, developers and key stakeholders with the knowledge needed to ensure a project is delivered successfully. Due to a lack of research in the area of CSF for heritage buildings, an exploratory approach was undertaken. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with stakeholders to solicit their views as to CSFs that lead to the successful adaption of all heritage buildings that had been subjected to re-use program in Perth, Western Australia, were examined.

Findings

Four CSFs were identified: research; matching function; function; and design and minimal change. It is proffered that by addressing the CSFs issues associated with latent conditions, building layout and commercial risk and uncertainty can be addressed. Yet, the Building Code of Australia will continue to be the most significant issue for owners/developers and project teams who embrace an adaptive re-use project.

Originality/value

To date there has been limited research undertaken with regard to determining the CSF for heritage buildings that have been subjected to adaptive re-use. The work presented in this paper identifies the key CSFs that emerged from the stock of heritage building’s in Perth, WA. Further research is required to determine the validity of the CSFs, however, those identified provide a benchmark for further studies in this fertile area.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2019

Huriye Armagan Dogan

The purpose of this paper is to develop a model which can measure the effect of perception on the assessment of cultural heritage by analysing the façades of buildings for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a model which can measure the effect of perception on the assessment of cultural heritage by analysing the façades of buildings for adaptive re-use and sustainable development strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper focusses on the correlation between adaptive re-use and sustainability of cultural heritage, by analysing the invisible social context which has an impact on the establishment of adaptive re-use strategies. The method adopted included literature review and applied experiments for extending the methodology of Langston on the adaptive re-use potential model in order to establish a new tool which can be applied to cultural heritage. The assessment process followed the integrated cultural heritage management approach to identify the indicators which can be implemented on cultural heritage, and, furthermore, for the sustainability of the environment.

Findings

The results demonstrate that the perception of the society can rely on different indicators which affect people to assert an artefact as cultural heritage. Furthermore, these indicators can have an impact on the adaptive re-use strategies regarding the interaction with society. Societies’ perception should not be omitted, and they need to be integrated while evaluating and developing the strategy of adaptive re-use. Therefore, a holistic approach to this process can bring continuity and sustainability to the environment.

Originality/value

No similar prior studies on the perception of cultural heritage as an approach to adaptive re-use strategies have been carried out. Therefore, it is hoped that this model can lead and guide, and, furthermore, be adopted in other similar situations in the assessment and decision-making process of adaptive re-use.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Dave Yates

The purpose of this study is to investigate how organizations use social media such as blogs to share and re-used knowledge during contingencies, disasters, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate how organizations use social media such as blogs to share and re-used knowledge during contingencies, disasters, and emergencies. The factors related to the knowledge itself – rather than the media – which lead to more and less re-use (particularly in the fast-paced and uncertain context of emergencies) are not well known.

Design/methodology/approach

Integrating theories of social media, knowledge management and mass communication, the author develops a model of the characteristics of knowledge (focus, function and features), characteristics of knowledge sharers and the user’s needs, which influence the extent to which knowledge is re-used.

Findings

A study of 645 blog posts revealed why some knowledge is re-used in emergencies more than other types of knowledge. Surprisingly, non-event-related knowledge is re-used more often than event-related knowledge, perhaps because users are less certain about how they would re-use non-event knowledge and, thus, are paradoxically more interested in what it might offer. Results also indicate several other factors which impact re-use.

Practical implications

Traditional mechanisms used to evaluate knowledge for reuse such as rank and organizational status are less important than the focus and function of the knowledge itself; they offer practitioners strategies for more efficient knowledge sharing during emergencies and identify opportunities for more effective employment of emergency management social media.

Originality/value

One of the first studies to dig deeper into factors of knowledge shared and re-used during emergencies, this research integrates several theoretical streams to explain why some knowledge is more valuable for re-use. It increases the understanding of knowledge sharing during disasters and offers strategies for development of knowledge systems for future emergencies.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Katleen Janssen

This paper aims to address the recent trends and developments relating to the re‐use of public sector information (PSI) and open government data.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address the recent trends and developments relating to the re‐use of public sector information (PSI) and open government data.

Design/methodology/approach

It starts from the European Commission's Digital Agenda, which stressed the importance of opening up access to content to promote the single market. While the 2003 PSI directive has contributed to this, barriers to the re‐use of PSI still remain, often based on a lack of awareness with public sector data holders and users. Some of these barriers are currently being challenged by the open government data (OGD) movement. While this movement has comparable objectives to the PSI directive, it is based on different arguments. This raises the question of how the two approaches relate.

Findings

The paper argues that the proponents of the re‐use of PSI and OGD should join forces to promote the availability of public sector data.

Originality/value

In this way, the public sector can be encouraged to rethink its information policy and move to a more coherent view on how data can be used to increase the benefits for the information society and the market for digital content.

Details

info, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2008

Rodolfo Stecher, Claudia Niederée, Wolfgang Nejdl and Paolo Bouquet

The discovery of the “right” ontology or ontology part is a central ingredient for effective ontology re‐use. The purpose of this paper is to present an approach for…

Abstract

Purpose

The discovery of the “right” ontology or ontology part is a central ingredient for effective ontology re‐use. The purpose of this paper is to present an approach for supporting a form of adaptive re‐use of sub‐ontologies, where the ontologies are deeply integrated beyond pure referencing.

Design/methodology/approach

Starting from an ontology draft which reflects the intended modeling perspective, the ontology engineer can be supported by suggesting similar already existing sub‐ontologies and ways for integrating them with the existing draft ontology. This paper's approach combines syntactic, linguistic, structural and logical methods into an innovative modeling‐perspective aware solution for detecting matchings between concepts from different ontologies. This paper focuses on the discovery and matching phase of this re‐use process.

Findings

Owing to the combination of techniques presented in this general approach, the work described performs in the general case as well as approaches tailored for a specific usage scenario.

Research limitations/implications

The methods used rely on lexical information obtained from the labels of the concepts and properties in the ontologies, which makes this approach appropriate in cases where this information is available. Also, this approach can handle some missing label information.

Practical implications

Ontology engineering tasks can take advantage from the proposed adaptive re‐use approach in order to re‐use existing ontologies or parts of them without introducing inconsistencies in the resulting ontology.

Originality/value

The adaptive re‐use of ontologies by finding and partially re‐using parts of existing ontological resources for building new ontologies is a new idea in the field, and the inclusion of the modeling perspective in the computation of the matches adds a new perspective that could also be exploited by other matching approaches.

Details

International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2018

Stuti Saxena

The paper aims to “re-use” the Open Government Data (OGD) published by the Election Commission of India (ECI). Bihar’s performance across General Elections, 2014, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to “re-use” the Open Government Data (OGD) published by the Election Commission of India (ECI). Bihar’s performance across General Elections, 2014, and Bihar Legislative Assembly Elections, 2015, is compared, wherein the role of contestants’ demographic profiles in determining their vote share is being investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses are derived based on the impact of contestants’ demographic profiles (age, marital status, social category, political party affiliation, educational qualification, availing telephone and email facility, criminal antecedents) on their vote share. Following a quantitative approach, multiple regression and logistic regression are used to draw inferences from the data contestants’ affidavits – sourced from the ECI website.

Findings

Results show that contestants’ demographic profiles impact their vote share in the elections. While the ECI website is a viable source for re-using the data available there, data are not available in a user-friendly format and this leads to difficulty in being re-used by different stakeholders.

Originality/value

Academic research on OGD re-use is negligible, and the present study seeks to contribute towards extant literature by underlining the significance of re-using OGD by drawing inferences from the data accessible via ECI.

Details

foresight, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2018

Stuti Saxena

Given that the Open Government Data (OGD) initiatives of any country are founded on principles of transparency and accountability, it is important that the data sets…

Abstract

Purpose

Given that the Open Government Data (OGD) initiatives of any country are founded on principles of transparency and accountability, it is important that the data sets permit a user-friendly interface for the data sets to be re-used. This paper aims to underline the major drivers and barriers to re-use the data sets in the context of the Philippines.

Design/methodology/approach

In line with the model proposed by Sieber and Johnson (2015), the paper invoked an investigation of the national OGD portal of the Philippines following a documentary analysis research approach.

Findings

The OGD portal of the Philippines permits data search and sharing via social media. Data sets are available in user-friendly formats with a detailed description of the data set itself in the form of metadata. At the same time, the OGD portal of the Philippines has many barriers to re-use. Data sets are not current, and no attempts have been made at updating the records. While the provision of data mapping is provided, the same is not effective as of now. Conducting statistical analysis is not possible online and some of the links are not active. Finally, users’ suggestions are acknowledged, but the contribution of users toward the existing data sets is not permitted as of now.

Research limitations/implications

Given that only a single country’s OGD initiative has been investigated in the study, further research is warranted to undertake a comparative analysis of OGD institutionalization across different countries.

Practical implications

Government authorities are encouraged to be more proactive in furthering the OGD initiative. Policymakers and practitioners may appreciate the underlying barriers in re-using the data sets and seek to address these concerns.

Originality/value

The OGD initiative of the Philippines has not been investigated so far despite the rising tide of the OGD initiatives across the globe. Given that most of the research on OGD is focused in developed countries, the present study seeks to contribute toward the extant literature by investigating the OGD portal of the Philippines and underlining the major drivers and barriers in re-using the data sets available via the portal.

Details

Digital Policy, Regulation and Governance, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5038

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Esra Kurul

The paper aims to report on the development of a process mapping approach to explore adaptive re‐use processes.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to report on the development of a process mapping approach to explore adaptive re‐use processes.

Design/methodology/approach

Four case studies of adaptive re‐use projects in London (UK) were conducted. Two are reported here. Data were collected through in‐depth interviews with key agents and archival research on planning case documentation. Archival research was also used to “triangulate” interview data, which was analysed by using NUD*IST (now QSR N6) and Decision Explorer™ (DE). Data analysis entailed coding in NUD*IST, and map building and analysis in DE.

Findings

The key common areas between different projects, and networked pivotal activities and issues are identified. A powerful tool for visualising project complexity, and hence for project assessment and evaluation, is provided.

Research limitations/implications

Statistical tools could have complemented the post‐analysis verification discussions with the interviewees to ensure validity of the findings. Data processing and data export/import between software tools are extremely labour intensive and time consuming. Automated visual output is relatively poor for presentation purposes. Tacit researcher bias may be inherent.

Practical implications

The findings provide a basis for developing specific management strategies for complex re‐use projects. This novel approach could be developed into a tool for: post‐project reviews, strategic learning for experienced practitioners, educating and training academics and novice practitioners, and for managing project knowledge.

Originality/value

The creative use of NUD*IST and DE in combination is novel. Experienced practitioners will be presented with a powerful tool for visualising project complexity, and thus for monitoring and reviewing the levels of complexity at each stage, once further development, automation and sophistication are achieved. The critical aspects of adaptive re‐use process, the key activities and issues are pointed out for novice practitioners. Researchers will find the adoption of content analysis and cognitive mapping tools to process mapping innovative.

Details

Facilities, vol. 25 no. 13/14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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