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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2016

David Kutasi

There are plenty of historic buildings bearing different stylistics in Budapest and many of them have residential function. In the city center of Pest, most of the…

Abstract

There are plenty of historic buildings bearing different stylistics in Budapest and many of them have residential function. In the city center of Pest, most of the properties are historic buildings constructed between the period of the Austro-Hungarian Compromise in 1876 and the World War II, but Buda also has some residential dwellings with historic value. Estimation of the value of the Budapest residential housing is an important issue for owners, real estate developers and investors, nevertheless not many studies have focused on the value components of those buildings in Central Eastern Europe or Hungary.

In this paper the value components of Budapest residential flats were identified using the hedonic regression method. On a sample of more than 1800 residential properties of Budapest the differences between historic, panel and other buildings were compared. The conclusion can be drawn that altering aspects are relevant for each segment. Even the categories determine large differences between panel buildings and non-panel buildings regarding the value. For the historic properties, the existence of balcony, the up-to-date type of heating, the good condition of the flat, the unique panorama, the location in Pest City, the vicinity of parks and the distance from noisy facilities are the most important factors. Meanwhile for panels the allocation on lower floors, the better heating system, the good condition, the location in Buda and the vicinity of market are the factors that have the major positive effect on the value. For the non-historic and non-panel buildings the balcony, the up-to-date heating system, the good condition, the luxurious Buda district location, vicinity of parks and remoteness of noisy facilities are the most important components of value.

Details

Open House International, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 August 2021

Kwadwo Twumasi-Ampofo, Rexford Assasie Oppong and Victor K. Quagraine

This study focuses on historic buildings and site preservation (HBSP), which forms part of cultural heritage amidst rampant demolishing and seeming neglect of such…

Abstract

Purpose

This study focuses on historic buildings and site preservation (HBSP), which forms part of cultural heritage amidst rampant demolishing and seeming neglect of such heritage in Ghana. The purpose of this study is to assess public awareness of the importance of HBSP in Kumasi.

Design/methodology/approach

The study combines qualitative and quantitative research methods. Primary data were collected through questionnaires and interviews based on a purposive sampling technique. Respondents were residents of Kumasi.

Findings

The study revealed that awareness of the importance of HBSP is dependent on the demographic variables. The young generation below 30 years seems more aware of the importance of HBSP.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited by the fact that respondents were not willing to reveal income levels. Laws governing cultural heritage, including HBSP at the MMDAs, was not studied in detail and could be an area for further research.

Practical implications

This study brings out the need to be aware of the importance of HBSP and train staff to enforce laws governing HBSP in six metropolitan, municipal and district assemblies (MMDAs) as part of Ghana's urban regeneration. This study further raises awareness among residents for sustainable architectural heritage preservation in Ghana.

Originality/value

The concept of HBSP is not popular in Ghana. This academic paper apparently assesses the level of awareness of the importance of HBSP among residents in Kumasi with an aim to identify and train staff of MMDAs on laws governing HBSP.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 November 2020

Rachel Paschoalin and Nigel Isaacs

Holistic renovation of historic and heritage buildings involving different stakeholders has the potential to reduce environmental impact. Climate change concerns are…

Abstract

Purpose

Holistic renovation of historic and heritage buildings involving different stakeholders has the potential to reduce environmental impact. Climate change concerns are emphasizing environmental issues of cultural built heritage leading to new policies, guidelines and methods dealing with the challenge on how to lessen the environmental impact of built heritage without damaging its cultural significance. The purpose of this paper is to review existing international and New Zealand holistic guidelines for renovation of historic and heritage buildings.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review is used to identify international projects, methods and criteria within the holistic approach. Secondly, the New Zealand context is explored and compared with best international practices.

Findings

For instance, in New Zealand one increasingly important issue is the many vacant heritage and historic buildings in provincial town centres that need action to deal with building code seismic changes. Upgrades and adaptive reuse are opportunities to make them more sustainable and climate change resilient. However, the lack of national holistic guidelines regarding the challenge of reducing environmental impact whilst keeping the heritage values is a critical gap which urgently needs to be resolved. The need is further increased within the context of the recently passed Zero Carbon Act 2019, which aims for national zero carbon emissions by 2050.

Originality/value

These shared responsibilities for conserving historic and heritage buildings to maintain life in provincial towns on one hand, and the need to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions on the other, have the potential to contribute to a sustainable development of cities and communities.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2015

Brit Anak Kayan

It is well recognised that Conservation Plan has attracted attention to the maintenance of historic buildings; despite diverse array of issues, particularly associated…

Abstract

Purpose

It is well recognised that Conservation Plan has attracted attention to the maintenance of historic buildings; despite diverse array of issues, particularly associated with “Green Maintenance” concept and methodology and sustainable repair approach. The theory of these three concepts currently exists, but fails to be realised in practical integration. The purpose of this paper to ask why this failure is occurring and how it influences sustainable historic environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is composed of a critical review of existing literature and an argument built based on the concept of a Conservation Plan, “Green Maintenance” concept and methodology and sustainable repair approach for historic buildings.

Findings

Despite the need of maintenance of historic buildings, this review suggests that a Conservation Plan often mitigates against its own association with “Green Maintenance”. Conversely, this could be improved by transforming the integration to be more pronounced in achieving sustainable repair for historic buildings.

Practical implications

An integration of the concept of a Conservation Plan, “Green Maintenance” and sustainable repair approach could be utilised to form the basis of decision-making process for achieving sustainable historic environment.

Social implications

An integration of Conservation Plan, “Green Maintenance” and sustainable repair approach will be positively welcomed as our society moves towards a low carbon economy and materials as well as “green” procurement.

Originality/value

Unless integration between of a Conservation Plan, “Green Maintenance” and sustainable repair is improved, much of our culturally significant historic buildings will not be repaired in sustainable ways and our future generation may lose their historic environment.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 March 2022

Itohan Esther Aigwi, Amarachukwu Nnadozie Nwadike, An Thi Hoan Le, Funmilayo Ebun Rotimi, Tanya Sorrell, Reza Jafarzadeh and James Rotimi

Currently trending as a practical approach to promote urban and seismic resilience, the adaptive reuse of historical buildings relies on expertise from various…

Abstract

Purpose

Currently trending as a practical approach to promote urban and seismic resilience, the adaptive reuse of historical buildings relies on expertise from various professional backgrounds ranging from conservation, urban planning, construction management, architecture, engineering to interior design. This paper explores the applicability of a performance-based multiple criteria decision assessment (MCDA) framework to prioritise underutilised historical buildings for adaptive reuse in Auckland, New Zealand while balancing the diverse interest of all relevant stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

A focus group workshop was conducted for relevant adaptive stakeholders in Auckland, New Zealand, to test the applicability of the performance-based MCDA framework developed by Aigwi et al. (2020) and prioritise four underutilised historical building alternatives for adaptive reuse interventions in Auckland, New Zealand.

Findings

Findings from this study revealed the significant potentials of the performance-based MCDA framework, both as an evidence-based measurement tool to prioritise underutilised earthquake-prone historical buildings in Auckland's central business district and as an effective decision-making strategy. Also, the framework allowed the inclusion of diverse stakeholders through the integration of collaborative rationality, ensuring consistency and transparency in the decision-making process.

Originality/value

The successful validation of the existing performance-based MCDA framework in Auckland, New Zealand, using multiple historical building alternatives, further strengthens its preceding validation by Aigwi et al. (2019) using only two historical buildings in Whanganui, New Zealand. The findings provide a theoretical platform for urban planning researchers to advance performance-based planning for adaptive reuse to other locations and fields. There are also interesting implications for local councils, heritage agencies, architects, urban planners, policymakers, building owners and developers in Auckland, New Zealand, as a guide to improving their understandings of: (1) the intangible values of optimal historical buildings perceived by the community as worthy of protection through adaptive reuse; and (2) the targeted needs of communities in the new functions of an optimal alternative from a group of representative historical building alternatives.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2021

Mohammadhossein Dehghan Pour Farashah, Ehsan Aslani, Solmaz Yadollahi and Zahed Ghaderi

In the early 2000s, a wave of new practices concerning the adaptive reuse (AR) of historic buildings into boutique hotels began in Yazd, Iran. This study presents the…

Abstract

Purpose

In the early 2000s, a wave of new practices concerning the adaptive reuse (AR) of historic buildings into boutique hotels began in Yazd, Iran. This study presents the findings of a postoccupancy evaluation (POE) of adaptively reused historic buildings into boutique hotels. It aims to explore and prioritize the main factors of architecture's physical aspects in the adapted buildings.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to carry out a POE, hotel guests' written reviews from online international and national travel platforms were analyzed. According to this preliminary analysis, a questionnaire was designed and randomly distributed among 300 hotel guests. The data obtained from the questionnaire were analyzed using SPSS software. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to reduce a set of indicators into the main components.

Findings

The findings revealed that “preliminary physical feasibility study and evaluation of building's functional potential” is the most important component with a weight of 0.709. Then, “adaptive reuse design” and “quality of building conservation” are placed with a weight of 0.232 and 0.058, respectively. The results show the mere attention of practitioners to architectural restoration rather than adapting historic buildings into boutique hotels in Yazd. Also, the lack of a specific framework for this purpose is felt in Iran.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could evaluate the architectural aspects of historic buildings that have been converted into various functions from the main users' views.

Practical implications

This research's main contribution is to recommend guidelines for more user-friendly boutique hotels. This includes principal components and their sub-indicators that should be considered in the AR process of historic buildings by conservators, investors and hoteliers. Also, the extracted factors can be implemented for boutique hotels' improvements in operation because they determine the order of priority from the users' viewpoint.

Originality/value

This study introduces a new application of POE in the field of conservation of heritage assets and the hospitality industry; it focuses on the evaluation of the users' feedback regarding the architectural aspects of adaptively reused historic buildings into boutique hotels based on original empirical data.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 December 2021

Mahmoud Sodangi and Zaheer Abbas Kazmi

The paper is aimed at identifying, analysing and prioritizing the critical constraints affecting efficient management of historic buildings in remote areas of Saudi Arabia.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper is aimed at identifying, analysing and prioritizing the critical constraints affecting efficient management of historic buildings in remote areas of Saudi Arabia.

Design/methodology/approach

Thematic content analysis and expert-based evaluation approaches were used to identify and evaluate the constraints. The DEMATEL technique was deployed to define the interrelationship complexities between the constraints and evaluate the impact of these interrelationships to ascertain the influential constraints.

Findings

The results identify “lack of clearly defined roles for the multiple government agencies” as the most influential constraint for managing historic sites and buildings in remote areas of Saudi Arabia.

Research limitations/implications

The contextual interrelationship between the constraints is due to the experts' perceptions, which may be biased due to their proficiencies and professional backgrounds. Since the evidence on which the findings of this paper are established is predominantly from experiences related to historic sites and buildings in remote areas of Saudi Arabia, the results of this paper may not be entirely applicable elsewhere.

Practical implications

The paper provides invaluable methodology that can support practitioners and policymakers to establish sustainable strategies that can enhance the management and protection of historic buildings in remote areas of Saudi Arabia.

Originality/value

This study noticeably contributes to knowledge by providing comprehensive understanding of the major impediments to the successful management of historic buildings in remote areas of Saudi Arabia, which can assist in mitigating the potential impacts of these constraints and to advocate for the achievement of efficient management and protection of the historic sites and buildings.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2021

Erica Avrami, Jennifer L. Most, Anna Gasha and Shreya M. Ghoshal

This research informs the intersection of climate and heritage policy development by examining the history of US energy policy as it relates to historic buildings

Abstract

Purpose

This research informs the intersection of climate and heritage policy development by examining the history of US energy policy as it relates to historic buildings, emerging policy tools to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and the implications of a changing legislative landscape on historic buildings through the case of New York City.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs a multi-method approach, including a review of US energy codes; discourse analysis of government records, energy studies, and reports related to historic buildings and energy; select research into energy-related heritage policy at the municipal level; and geospatial and statistical methods to analyze policy implications in the case study of New York City.

Findings

Historic buildings have long been afforded exemptions from energy code compliance in the US, and these waivers are widespread. Contemporary operating energy and greenhouse gas data, as well as energy justice findings about whom these waivers privilege, challenge these exemptions and signal a need for significant policy reform in light of climate change.

Originality/value

This study questions longstanding rhetoric about historic buildings being inherently green and supports the need for more evidence-based research to undergird heritage policy reform that is equitable and climate-responsive.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Fang Wang, Xiaoning Xue and Yingying Wang

Maintaining a city’s identity and locality is an urgent problem in urban construction. Historical districts are very important parts of a city. However, non-heritage…

Abstract

Purpose

Maintaining a city’s identity and locality is an urgent problem in urban construction. Historical districts are very important parts of a city. However, non-heritage buildings, which make a significant contribution to the character and appearance of historical areas, are facing arbitrary demolition. They are more often ignored compared with buildings on the protection list. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper chooses two historic blocks in Wuxi, in which 256 non-heritage buildings were examined, the SPSS method and the AHP method are used to find renewal modes for the buildings that had not finished updates, and the two blocks are then used as practical cases to validate the matching results.

Findings

In conclusion, on the one hand, according to different building categories, different renewal modes are found. On the other hand, this study finds differences in the renewal modes of different historic districts.

Originality/value

The study shows a renewal method for non-heritage buildings, which require attention due to their dangerous situation, as these buildings in historical districts also contribute to a city’s uniqueness and locality. These results should be helpful in the planning and practices for urban historical districts.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2013

Esther H.K. Yung and Edwin H.W. Chan

This study aims to examine whether there are significant differences between laymen's, professionals' and policy makers' evaluations of the conservation of historic buildings.

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine whether there are significant differences between laymen's, professionals' and policy makers' evaluations of the conservation of historic buildings.

Design/methodology/approach

The research began with interview surveys using a sample of laymen and professionals in the built environment and it examined their evaluation standards of a sample of 25 historic buildings in Hong Kong. The research also used the controversial Queen's Pier case to examine the extent to which different preferences of conservation between laymen and professionals and policy makers has led to its conservation campaign.

Findings

The results indicate that laymen and professional groups evaluate historic buildings based on slightly different criteria. The research also reveals that their preference for what is worth conserving is different from policy makers. The debate over the conservation of the Queen's Pier illustrates a wide range of issues other than differences of preference that may have stimulated the campaign.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size of the respondents and the sample buildings are limited due to manpower resource and funding. Further study can expand the sampling size.

Originality/value

The study is original research which illustrates the differences between laymen's, professionals' and policy makers' evaluation criteria and assessment of historic buildings. It recommends a greater understanding of all stakeholders' interests in heritage conservation and the incorporation of the public's view into legislative and administrative procedures in designating and listing historic buildings.

Details

Facilities, vol. 31 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 50000