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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2016

David Kutasi

There are plenty of historic buildings bearing different stylistics in Budapest and many of them have residential function. In the city center of Pest, most of the…

Abstract

There are plenty of historic buildings bearing different stylistics in Budapest and many of them have residential function. In the city center of Pest, most of the properties are historic buildings constructed between the period of the Austro-Hungarian Compromise in 1876 and the World War II, but Buda also has some residential dwellings with historic value. Estimation of the value of the Budapest residential housing is an important issue for owners, real estate developers and investors, nevertheless not many studies have focused on the value components of those buildings in Central Eastern Europe or Hungary.

In this paper the value components of Budapest residential flats were identified using the hedonic regression method. On a sample of more than 1800 residential properties of Budapest the differences between historic, panel and other buildings were compared. The conclusion can be drawn that altering aspects are relevant for each segment. Even the categories determine large differences between panel buildings and non-panel buildings regarding the value. For the historic properties, the existence of balcony, the up-to-date type of heating, the good condition of the flat, the unique panorama, the location in Pest City, the vicinity of parks and the distance from noisy facilities are the most important factors. Meanwhile for panels the allocation on lower floors, the better heating system, the good condition, the location in Buda and the vicinity of market are the factors that have the major positive effect on the value. For the non-historic and non-panel buildings the balcony, the up-to-date heating system, the good condition, the luxurious Buda district location, vicinity of parks and remoteness of noisy facilities are the most important components of value.

Details

Open House International, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2020

Rachel Paschoalin and Nigel Isaacs

Holistic renovation of historic and heritage buildings involving different stakeholders has the potential to reduce environmental impact. Climate change concerns are…

Abstract

Purpose

Holistic renovation of historic and heritage buildings involving different stakeholders has the potential to reduce environmental impact. Climate change concerns are emphasizing environmental issues of cultural built heritage leading to new policies, guidelines and methods dealing with the challenge on how to lessen the environmental impact of built heritage without damaging its cultural significance. The purpose of this paper is to review existing international and New Zealand holistic guidelines for renovation of historic and heritage buildings.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review is used to identify international projects, methods and criteria within the holistic approach. Secondly, the New Zealand context is explored and compared with best international practices.

Findings

For instance, in New Zealand one increasingly important issue is the many vacant heritage and historic buildings in provincial town centres that need action to deal with building code seismic changes. Upgrades and adaptive reuse are opportunities to make them more sustainable and climate change resilient. However, the lack of national holistic guidelines regarding the challenge of reducing environmental impact whilst keeping the heritage values is a critical gap which urgently needs to be resolved. The need is further increased within the context of the recently passed Zero Carbon Act 2019, which aims for national zero carbon emissions by 2050.

Originality/value

These shared responsibilities for conserving historic and heritage buildings to maintain life in provincial towns on one hand, and the need to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions on the other, have the potential to contribute to a sustainable development of cities and communities.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2015

Brit Anak Kayan

It is well recognised that Conservation Plan has attracted attention to the maintenance of historic buildings; despite diverse array of issues, particularly associated…

Abstract

Purpose

It is well recognised that Conservation Plan has attracted attention to the maintenance of historic buildings; despite diverse array of issues, particularly associated with “Green Maintenance” concept and methodology and sustainable repair approach. The theory of these three concepts currently exists, but fails to be realised in practical integration. The purpose of this paper to ask why this failure is occurring and how it influences sustainable historic environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is composed of a critical review of existing literature and an argument built based on the concept of a Conservation Plan, “Green Maintenance” concept and methodology and sustainable repair approach for historic buildings.

Findings

Despite the need of maintenance of historic buildings, this review suggests that a Conservation Plan often mitigates against its own association with “Green Maintenance”. Conversely, this could be improved by transforming the integration to be more pronounced in achieving sustainable repair for historic buildings.

Practical implications

An integration of the concept of a Conservation Plan, “Green Maintenance” and sustainable repair approach could be utilised to form the basis of decision-making process for achieving sustainable historic environment.

Social implications

An integration of Conservation Plan, “Green Maintenance” and sustainable repair approach will be positively welcomed as our society moves towards a low carbon economy and materials as well as “green” procurement.

Originality/value

Unless integration between of a Conservation Plan, “Green Maintenance” and sustainable repair is improved, much of our culturally significant historic buildings will not be repaired in sustainable ways and our future generation may lose their historic environment.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Fang Wang, Xiaoning Xue and Yingying Wang

Maintaining a city’s identity and locality is an urgent problem in urban construction. Historical districts are very important parts of a city. However, non-heritage…

Abstract

Purpose

Maintaining a city’s identity and locality is an urgent problem in urban construction. Historical districts are very important parts of a city. However, non-heritage buildings, which make a significant contribution to the character and appearance of historical areas, are facing arbitrary demolition. They are more often ignored compared with buildings on the protection list. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper chooses two historic blocks in Wuxi, in which 256 non-heritage buildings were examined, the SPSS method and the AHP method are used to find renewal modes for the buildings that had not finished updates, and the two blocks are then used as practical cases to validate the matching results.

Findings

In conclusion, on the one hand, according to different building categories, different renewal modes are found. On the other hand, this study finds differences in the renewal modes of different historic districts.

Originality/value

The study shows a renewal method for non-heritage buildings, which require attention due to their dangerous situation, as these buildings in historical districts also contribute to a city’s uniqueness and locality. These results should be helpful in the planning and practices for urban historical districts.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2013

Esther H.K. Yung and Edwin H.W. Chan

This study aims to examine whether there are significant differences between laymen's, professionals' and policy makers' evaluations of the conservation of historic buildings.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine whether there are significant differences between laymen's, professionals' and policy makers' evaluations of the conservation of historic buildings.

Design/methodology/approach

The research began with interview surveys using a sample of laymen and professionals in the built environment and it examined their evaluation standards of a sample of 25 historic buildings in Hong Kong. The research also used the controversial Queen's Pier case to examine the extent to which different preferences of conservation between laymen and professionals and policy makers has led to its conservation campaign.

Findings

The results indicate that laymen and professional groups evaluate historic buildings based on slightly different criteria. The research also reveals that their preference for what is worth conserving is different from policy makers. The debate over the conservation of the Queen's Pier illustrates a wide range of issues other than differences of preference that may have stimulated the campaign.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size of the respondents and the sample buildings are limited due to manpower resource and funding. Further study can expand the sampling size.

Originality/value

The study is original research which illustrates the differences between laymen's, professionals' and policy makers' evaluation criteria and assessment of historic buildings. It recommends a greater understanding of all stakeholders' interests in heritage conservation and the incorporation of the public's view into legislative and administrative procedures in designating and listing historic buildings.

Details

Facilities, vol. 31 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2019

Daniel Herrera-Avellanosa, Franziska Haas, Gustaf Leijonhufvud, Tor Brostrom, Alessia Buda, Valeria Pracchi, Amanda Laurel Webb, Walter Hüttler and Alexandra Troi

Improving the energy performance of historic buildings has the potential to reduce carbon emissions while protecting built heritage through its continued use. However…

Abstract

Purpose

Improving the energy performance of historic buildings has the potential to reduce carbon emissions while protecting built heritage through its continued use. However, implementing energy retrofits in these buildings faces social, economic, and technical barriers. The purpose of this conceptual paper is to present the approach of IEA-SHC Task 59 to address some of these barriers.

Design/methodology/approach

Task 59 aims to achieve the lowest possible energy demand for historic buildings. This paper proposes a definition for this concept and identifies three key socio-technical barriers to achieving this goal: the decision-makers’ lack of engagement in the renovation of historic buildings, a lack of support during the design process and limited access to proven retrofit solutions. Two methods – dissemination of best-practice and guidelines – are discussed in this paper as critical approaches for addressing the first two barriers.

Findings

An assessment of existing databases indicates a lack of best-practice examples focused specifically on historic buildings and the need for tailored information describing these case studies. Similarly, an initial evaluation of guidelines highlighted the need for process-oriented guidance and its evaluation in practice.

Originality/value

This paper provides a novel definition of lowest possible energy demand for historic buildings that is broadly applicable in both practice and research. Both best-practices and guidelines are intended to be widely disseminated throughout the field.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Scott McGibbon and Mohamed Abdel-Wahab

Scotland’s built heritage (pre-1919 building stock) is exhibiting varying levels of disrepair, in particular for stonemasonry works, despite the government’s on-going…

Abstract

Purpose

Scotland’s built heritage (pre-1919 building stock) is exhibiting varying levels of disrepair, in particular for stonemasonry works, despite the government’s on-going efforts for promoting higher standards of repair and maintenance (R & M) of historic buildings. The purpose of this paper is to examine the problems associated with the R & M of historic buildings.

Design/methodology/approach

Two case studies (Projects A and B) exhibiting critical disrepair are reported. Site surveying was carried-out on both projects, to identify site features and R & M problems along with proposed solutions drawing on the lead author’s extensive industry experience as a stonemasonry consultant. Three semi-structured interviews were conducted with professionals involved in each project to elicit views on the challenges faced. Additionally, three industry experts were interviewed to provide a wider perspective of the R & M challenges facing historic buildings.

Findings

Neglect and poor practice resulted in both projects becoming more challenging and expensive than they needed to be, which was attributed to generic and advanced skills 6deficiencies of the workforce. There is an urgent need for a multi-disciplinary approach to the development of a method statement for R & M, drawing on the expertise of professionals and contractors, particularly when specifying repairs to structural elements.

Originality/value

This paper has provided original and valuable information on R & M problems, highlighting the importance of continued investment in skills development for historic building R & M to enhance existing current training provision and practice. There is a need for further similar project-based data to inform skills development strategies for the R & M of historic buildings as well as enhancing existing qualification frameworks.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Noriza Revaula Tibon and Raniel Mejia Suiza

Structures such as buildings are at risk to the natural hazards such as earthquakes. Damage and loss of these structures may cause not just human lives but cultural…

Abstract

Purpose

Structures such as buildings are at risk to the natural hazards such as earthquakes. Damage and loss of these structures may cause not just human lives but cultural heritage to be lost as well. This study aims to look into the exposure and vulnerability that deal with how many historic buildings there are in Metro Manila, how they are classified and how susceptible these buildings are to damage because of a certain amount of ground motion.

Design/methodology/approach

Inventories for exposure were conducted according to structural material, height and vintage. The building typologies of HAZARDS US Multi-hazard and UPD Institute of Civil Engineering were used and modified in this study. Three buildings, specifically the Central United Methodist Church (CUMC), Ellinwood Malate Church and Ermita Church, were modeled and analyzed with the aid of ETABS. Using the performance points and capacity curves derived from the nonlinear analysis, vulnerability was quantified by coming up with a vulnerability curve that expresses damage as a function of ground motion.

Findings

It was concluded that there are 54 historic buildings present in Metro Manila as of 2012. Reinforced concrete moment frames comprised the majority of historic buildings at 44.5 per cent of the population. Among the three buildings, CUMC responded as the strongest and Ermita Church responded as the weakest.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils the need to quantify the seismic exposure and vulnerability of the historic buildings in Metro Manila, as the more vulnerable these structures are, the more they need to be strengthened against potential hazards.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Article
Publication date: 23 July 2021

Ana Carolina Franco De Oliveira, Cristiano Saad Travassos do Carmo, Alexandre Santana Cruz and Renata Gonçalves Faisca

In developing countries, such as Brazil, the construction sector is consistently focused on the construction of new buildings, and there is no dissemination of the…

Abstract

Purpose

In developing countries, such as Brazil, the construction sector is consistently focused on the construction of new buildings, and there is no dissemination of the preservation, restoration and maintenance of historic buildings. Idle buildings, due to the use and lack of maintenance, present pathological manifestations, such as moisture problems that compromise specially their thermal and energy performance. With this in mind, the purpose of this work is to create a digital model using terrestrial photogrammetry and suggest retrofit interventions based on computer simulation to improve the thermal and energy performance of a historical building.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed methodology combined terrestrial photogrammetry using common smartphones and commercial software for historical buildings with building information modeling (historic building information modeling (HBIM)) and building energy modeling (BEM). The approach follows five steps: planning, site visit, data processing, data modeling and results. Also, as a case study, the School of Architecture and Urbanism of the Fluminense Federal University, built in 1888, was chosen to validate the approach.

Findings

A digital map of pathological manifestations in the HBIM model was developed, and interventions considering the application of expanded polystyrene in the envelope to reduce energy consumption were outlined. From the synergy between HBIM and BEM, it was concluded that the information modeled using photogrammetry was fundamental to create the energy model, and simulations were needed to optimize the possible solutions in terms of energy consumption.

Originality/value

Firstly, the work proposes a reasonable methodology to be applied in development countries without sophisticated technologies, but with acceptable precision for the study purpose. Secondly, the presented study shows that the use of HBIM for energy modeling proved to be useful to simulate possible solutions that optimize the thermal and energy performance.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2018

Itohan Esther Aigwi, Temitope Egbelakin and Jason Ingham

Most provincial town centres in New Zealand typically feature old and vacant historical buildings, the majority of which possess heritage values. The growing perception…

Abstract

Purpose

Most provincial town centres in New Zealand typically feature old and vacant historical buildings, the majority of which possess heritage values. The growing perception that it is cheaper to repurpose vacant historical buildings rather than demolishing and rebuilding them is one of the factors that have made the adaptive reuse approach so popular. However, will this also be the case for provincial town centres in New Zealand? The purpose of this paper is to identify and explore the key factors that could influence the efficacy of adaptive reuse, and check for significant differences in the effect that each perceived factor would have on the adaptive reuse efficacy as a justifiable resilient and sustainable approach towards the regeneration of a major provincial town centre in New Zealand that is currently experiencing inner-city shrinkage.

Design/methodology/approach

A focus group workshop was conducted with 22 stakeholders involved in an existing town centre regeneration agenda for Whanganui. Closed-ended questionnaires were administered to the workshop participants to measure their opinions regarding the efficacy of the adaptive reuse approach for the regeneration of Whanganui’s town centre. The participant mix comprised a combination of structural engineers, quantity surveyors, architects, estate valuers, building owners/developers, legal representatives, heritage representatives and local government council representatives.

Findings

The study reported a high proportion of respondents that strongly agreed to the positive impacts of adaptive reuse with regards to the discussed priority aspects, hence, justifying the efficacy of the approach, towards delivering a vibrant town centre for Whanganui. Also, the Friedman’s analysis suggests that no significant differences existed among all perceived adaptive reuse efficacy criteria by the workshop participants, therefore justifying the approach.

Originality/value

This paper’s originality pertains to the practicality of changing the use of vacant historical buildings in Whanganui, which is one of New Zealand’s major provincial town centres, to renegotiate resilience and sustainable urban regeneration for the area.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

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