Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 November 2011

Peter A. Bullen and Peter E.D. Love

There is growing acceptance that heritage buildings are an important element of Australia's social capital and that heritage conservation provides economic, cultural and…

Downloads
13924

Abstract

Purpose

There is growing acceptance that heritage buildings are an important element of Australia's social capital and that heritage conservation provides economic, cultural and social benefits to urban communities. The decision whether to reuse a building entails a complex set of considerations including location, heritage, architectural assets, and market trends. The role of building conservation has changed from preservation to being part of a broader strategy for urban regeneration and sustainability. A growing body of opinion supports the view that adaptive reuse is a powerful strategy for handling this change. Urban development and subsequent redevelopment has a significant impact on the environment and the purpose of this paper is to investigate how the conservation of heritage buildings may contribute to a more sustainable urban environment.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines the views and experiences of architects, developers and building managers who have been involved with the adaptive reuse of heritage buildings. In total, 60 semi‐structured interviews were drawn from this stakeholder group to investigate their current understanding of the sustainability issues associated with the adaptive reuse of heritage buildings.

Findings

The subsequent data show that despite many positive outcomes in terms of sustainability, the adaptive reuse of heritage buildings is considered to create many problems; not the least of which is whether heritage buildings are icons that should be conserved or whether they are in fact eyesores and unviable for adaptive reuse.

Originality/value

The contribution of heritage buildings to the three tenets of sustainability has not previously been explored comprehensively and as a result there is a conflict of interest between the preservation of heritage values and progression of the sustainable urban design agenda.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 March 2017

Rayman Mohamed, Robin Boyle, Allan Yilun Yang and Joseph Tangari

There is a resurgence in the adaptive reuse of buildings. However, there is a lack of literature that pulls all the strands of adaptive reuse together. Furthermore…

Downloads
1160

Abstract

Purpose

There is a resurgence in the adaptive reuse of buildings. However, there is a lack of literature that pulls all the strands of adaptive reuse together. Furthermore, despite claims that it is motivated by the 3 Es of the sustainability triangle, the authors could find no research that critiques adaptive reuse from this perspective. The purpose of this study is to review the literature to collect pertinent information in a single place and to critically examine whether adaptive reuse incorporates the 3 Es of sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodological approach of this study is a literature review and a critical analysis of the practice of adaptive review.

Findings

Adaptive reuse is concentrated at the environment and economic development corners of the sustainability triangle. There are positive interactions along this edge. The authors attribute this to the fact that the same actors – the private and public sectors – are located at both corners of the triangle, and they have shared interests. This is different from the wider sustainability literature, where major actors at each corner are different and tensions along each edge are resolved through mediation. In adaptive reuse, there are no actors at the equity corner of the triangle, and there are minimal attempts to address concerns along the equity–environment and equity–economic development edges of the triangle.

Research limitations/implications

This study focuses on the USA.

Practical implications

This study suggests policy interventions that address the equity issue in adaptive reuse.

Originality/value

This is the first study to provide a succinct review of contemporary adaptive reuse and that places the practice within the framework of the 3 Es of sustainability.

Details

Facilities, vol. 35 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 August 2018

Itohan Esther Aigwi, Temitope Egbelakin and Jason Ingham

Most provincial town centres in New Zealand typically feature old and vacant historical buildings, the majority of which possess heritage values. The growing perception…

Downloads
1304

Abstract

Purpose

Most provincial town centres in New Zealand typically feature old and vacant historical buildings, the majority of which possess heritage values. The growing perception that it is cheaper to repurpose vacant historical buildings rather than demolishing and rebuilding them is one of the factors that have made the adaptive reuse approach so popular. However, will this also be the case for provincial town centres in New Zealand? The purpose of this paper is to identify and explore the key factors that could influence the efficacy of adaptive reuse, and check for significant differences in the effect that each perceived factor would have on the adaptive reuse efficacy as a justifiable resilient and sustainable approach towards the regeneration of a major provincial town centre in New Zealand that is currently experiencing inner-city shrinkage.

Design/methodology/approach

A focus group workshop was conducted with 22 stakeholders involved in an existing town centre regeneration agenda for Whanganui. Closed-ended questionnaires were administered to the workshop participants to measure their opinions regarding the efficacy of the adaptive reuse approach for the regeneration of Whanganui’s town centre. The participant mix comprised a combination of structural engineers, quantity surveyors, architects, estate valuers, building owners/developers, legal representatives, heritage representatives and local government council representatives.

Findings

The study reported a high proportion of respondents that strongly agreed to the positive impacts of adaptive reuse with regards to the discussed priority aspects, hence, justifying the efficacy of the approach, towards delivering a vibrant town centre for Whanganui. Also, the Friedman’s analysis suggests that no significant differences existed among all perceived adaptive reuse efficacy criteria by the workshop participants, therefore justifying the approach.

Originality/value

This paper’s originality pertains to the practicality of changing the use of vacant historical buildings in Whanganui, which is one of New Zealand’s major provincial town centres, to renegotiate resilience and sustainable urban regeneration for the area.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 June 2021

Mohammad B. Hamida and Mohammad A. Hassanain

This paper aims to present a generic lifecycle framework model for guiding architects, engineers, contractors and facilities managers (AEC/FM) practitioners on the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a generic lifecycle framework model for guiding architects, engineers, contractors and facilities managers (AEC/FM) practitioners on the effective implementation of adaptive reuse projects.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed approach of qualitative and quantitative techniques was followed in the development of the framework model. A literature review was conducted to comprehend the processes involved in adaptive reuse projects. In total, 90 AEC/FM practitioners were surveyed to identify the current practices in these projects. A generic framework model was then developed to standardize the processes involved, using integration definition for function modeling process modeling methodology. Face-to-face interviews with a targeted group of 30 AEC/FM practitioners were conducted, to validate the developed framework model, by assessing the importance and the frequency of implementing each function in the developed framework model.

Findings

The framework model consisted of four sequential processes, namely, assess the feasibility of the adaptive reuse project, design the adaptive reuse project, construct the adaptive reuse project and operate and maintain the adaptive reuse project. The validation confirmed the importance of all the framework functions and the frequency of their implementation.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the literature and the AEC/FM professions, through developing a lifecycle and knowledge-oriented framework model for building adaptive reuse. The framework presents clear documentation of adaptive reuse processes. Thus, it holds the potential of endeavoring on adaptive reuse projects to be more efficient.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 July 2019

Visar Hoxha

The purpose of this paper is to study the sustainable impact of adaptive reuse of shopping malls built during communism in Kosovo.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the sustainable impact of adaptive reuse of shopping malls built during communism in Kosovo.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study uses qualitative research using semi-structured interviews with architects, civil engineers, real estate developers and facility managers.

Findings

The study found that it is the predominant opinion of respondents that the economic impact of adaptive reuse of old shopping malls in Kosovo is reflected through extension of useful life of the malls, lower cost of reuse vs demolition, economic and tourism development of the neighborhood, job creation and increase of property prices in the surrounding area. In addition, the study found that it is the predominant opinion of respondents that by adaptive reuse of old shopping malls, the revitalization and social dynamism of the surrounding area will be improved and collective memory and identity of these shopping malls will be extended, including the increased traffic, space utilization and security. The study concludes that operational CO2 emission of the old shopping malls will be reduced after their sustainable adaptation and also the embodied energy of the building materials will be reused.

Research limitations/implications

The study has several implications. For real estate developers, it shows that is less costly to adapt and refurbish rather than redevelop. For authorities, it shows that by adapting old communist shopping malls, they would extend the collective memory of those locations, improve the social life and utilization of public spaces in the surrounding areas. The final implication is for municipal authorities and environmentalists that but allowing adaptation rather than demolition and redevelopment the embodied CO2 emission will be significantly reduced.

Originality/value

The study is the first qualitative study about the impact of adaptive reuse of old communist style commercial centers in Kosovo.

Details

Property Management, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 April 2021

Mohammad B. Hamida and Mohammad A. Hassanain

This paper investigates the current practices of adaptive reuse projects, within the context of architecture, engineering, construction and facilities management (ACE/FM…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates the current practices of adaptive reuse projects, within the context of architecture, engineering, construction and facilities management (ACE/FM) industries.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed research methodology, combining qualitative and quantitative techniques, was followed. Literature review was performed to comprehend various aspects pertaining to building adaptive reuse. Three questionnaire surveys were administered on 90 AEC/FM practitioners, to investigate the current practices of adaptive reuse projects in Saudi Arabia. The questionnaire surveys were directed to 30 architects/engineers (A/Es), 30 contractors and 30 facilities managers, respectively, through face-to-face interviews. The qualitative and quantitative findings of each questionnaire survey were analyzed. Recommendations were proposed for each of the professional domains, to enhance the overall AEC/FM performance in future adaptive reuse projects.

Findings

The findings pointed out the necessity of accurately planning and designing the adaptive reuse in accordance with the spatial, technical, legislative, economic and functional considerations. The findings revealed the significance of contractors' role in conducting effective supervision over the managerial and technical processes during the implementation of the change of use. It also indicated the importance of the facilities managers' role in performing all daily operational activities, to maintain satisfactory performance of the adaptively reused buildings.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the relevant literature to the building adaptation, through investigating the perspectives of AEC/FM practitioners on adaptive reuse projects. The findings would enable AEC/FM practitioners to improve their professional practices in future adaptive reuse projects, in an integrated manner.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 September 2020

Mohammad B. Hamida, Mohammad A. Hassanain and Abdul-Mohsen Al-Hammad

This paper intends to review and assess the factors influencing adaptive reuse of commercial projects, throughout their life cycle, in Saudi Arabia.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper intends to review and assess the factors influencing adaptive reuse of commercial projects, throughout their life cycle, in Saudi Arabia.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed approach of literature review, pilot-testing and questionnaire survey was utilized to identify and assess the factors affecting adaptive reuse of commercial projects. Thirty-eight factors were identified and categorized under four groups, corresponding to the key phases of the project life cycle. The questionnaire survey was administered to a targeted group of 90 architecture/engineering, construction and facilities management (AEC/FM) practitioners of building adaptive reuse, in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. The relative importance index (RII) for each factor was calculated. Three levels of agreement, based on the ranking of the factors, among the respondents were determined.

Findings

The most important factors affecting adaptive reuse of commercial projects are: structural integrity of the building, municipal approval for the land use change, enforcement of safety procedures at the project site, compliance with health and safety measures and accuracy and completeness of the contract documents. A high level of agreement was observed among the three groups of respondents, on the ranking of the factors.

Originality/value

This research expands the body of knowledge, through providing AEC/FM practitioners, with the type, importance and ranking of the influential factors on adaptive reuse of commercial projects, throughout their life cycle.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Sheila Conejos, Craig Langston and Jim Smith

This paper aims to make the case for the development of an adaptive reuse rating tool targeted to new building design that maximises the embedded adaptive reuse potential…

Downloads
1391

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to make the case for the development of an adaptive reuse rating tool targeted to new building design that maximises the embedded adaptive reuse potential of these buildings later in their life, thereby adding to built environment sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory study retrospectively analyses successful adaptive reuse projects to establish and test a multi-criteria decision-making model for new design projects. This paper contains a report on the final stages of the research methodology (quantitative approach) used in the development of the adaptSTAR model that critically assesses the list of design criteria identified in the first stage of the study. Improvements to the case studies that would have further enhanced their reuse potential later in life are proposed. The results are compared to an established decision tool (adaptive reuse potential [ARP] model) to determine their level of consistency.

Findings

The findings of this research show that design criteria can be identified and weighted according to seven categories to calculate a building’s adaptive reuse star rating. Both the adaptSTAR and ARP models exhibit a strong relationship and are positively correlated.

Originality/value

The research demonstrates that by applying adaptSTAR to new designs, it will contribute to greater sustainability for the built environment in the long term via reducing the rate of building obsolescence.

Details

Facilities, vol. 33 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Michael Paul Louw

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the feasibility of the adaptive reuse of a particular case study, and the evaluation of it within the context of international…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the feasibility of the adaptive reuse of a particular case study, and the evaluation of it within the context of international research done on similar projects. It aims to highlight the reuse potential of industrial structures by private developers, and the financial, environmental and social advantages that they could hold.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review that explores these themes is followed by the post-occupancy analysis of the case study. Data were gathered primarily through interviews with key role players in the project, site visits and an analysis of the relevant project documentation.

Findings

While there are a number of international examples of the reuse of power stations in particular, these are mostly on a large scale, dependent mostly on government funding, lottery funding and donations and generally stripped of most of their machinery. The case study is a smaller-scale example which demonstrates that a project of this nature can be entirely funded by a private developer, that it can be sustainable and that it can be done while keeping most of the original machinery in place. The case study confirms a number of findings that are revealed in current research in the field, and it also shows the relative advantages of adaptive reuse when compared to new-build projects.

Research limitations/implications

There is fairly limited information and published research about adaptive reuse, especially in South Africa, so the paper builds on international knowledge on the subject while exposing a suitable local example. It is hoped that the study will not only lead to further research and post-occupancy analysis of similar projects in South Africa in particular, but also support international research that indicates the feasibility of adaptive reuse.

Originality/value

The Thesen Islands power station (or the Turbine Hotel as it is now known) could potentially be used as a precedent for similar redevelopments, and it could shed some light on the opportunities and constraints related to the management of fixed engineering assets.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2011

Quazi M. Mahtab-uz-Zaman

At a time, when there are world-wide calls for sustainable building design and construction focusing on building adaptation and remodeling rather than demolition and…

Abstract

At a time, when there are world-wide calls for sustainable building design and construction focusing on building adaptation and remodeling rather than demolition and replacement, a local system of remodeling and functional adaptation has been applied in many residential and commercial buildings in Bangladesh. Focusing on case studies in Dhaka city where major urban regeneration takes place, building adaptation is an emerging practice where economy has a critical role to play in convincing client, users, designers and builders to encourage the local method of adaptation process to suit the changing need of the occupants.

A case of adaptation of a residential building has been studied to generate an understanding of the local adaptation process. This process is found in many parts of the inner city built environment, which collectively affects urban regeneration process and reshape the urban form of the city and its edge condition. Findings from the exploratory studies suggest that despite the absence of Habraken's support-infill knowledge, the local practice of adaptation can be institutionalized as a sustainable building development process that is more economic and place-responsive approach than rebuilding.

Details

Open House International, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000