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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2019

Jun Yao, Ju Wang and Huidan Zhang

To protect industrial cultural heritage, the methods of overall protection and utilization of industrial heritage were put forward in the transformation and development of…

Abstract

To protect industrial cultural heritage, the methods of overall protection and utilization of industrial heritage were put forward in the transformation and development of resource-based cities. Taking Chongqing, a famous old industrial city in China, as the research object, from the cultural heritage, history, architecture, urban planning and other disciplines, the construction of Chongqing industrial heritage protection theory and practice methods were explored to guide the protection and utilization of Chongqing industrial heritage. A progressive evaluation method from the whole to the local was established. Industrial cities, typical corporate and architectural heritage were evaluated. The overall characteristics of urban industrial development were reflected. The renewal of old industrial areas and the protection of industrial heritage were elaborated through the overall co-ordination of urban design and detailed planning. The results showed that it was the key to integrate the protection elements and requirements into the detailed urban control planning. Therefore, special planning plays an important role in protecting industrial heritage.

Details

Open House International, vol. 44 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 March 2021

Parsa Arbab and Gelareh Alborzi

Regeneration of industrial heritage aims to display the patrimony assets by launching measures to convert them into cultural spaces associated with sustainable initiatives…

Abstract

Purpose

Regeneration of industrial heritage aims to display the patrimony assets by launching measures to convert them into cultural spaces associated with sustainable initiatives for satisfying environmental, social and economic demands in the city. The adaptive transformation and reusing process of industrial heritage constitutes a crucial cultural objective and consequently must be identified in a way that simultaneously integrates preservation with conversion and conservation with refurbishment. Hence, this paper explores to develop a framework for the sustainable regeneration of industrial heritage in cities.

Design/methodology/approach

By reviewing the current literature, research and experiences on urban industrial heritage, including existing approaches, frameworks, and case studies, this study brings a theoretical and conceptual approach to sustainable regeneration of industrial heritage, which is a fundamental start point for conducting further research and performing practical projects.

Findings

Three key phases of the Initiation as decision context, including understand the characteristics and assess the significance, the Planning as decision problem, including study the feasibility, develop a policy, and prepare a proposed reuse plan, and the Execution as decision output, including implement the plan, monitor the results and review the plan should be considered regarding the sustainable regeneration of urban industrial heritage.

Originality/value

The suggested framework considers sustainable regeneration of industrial heritage in cities as a decision-making process, which requires defining the decision context, analyzing the decision problem, and finally, results in the decision output. Accordingly, it seems to help bridge the gap between various discourses and planning perspectives and make all stakeholders' involvement easier, more effective and efficient regarding the sustainable regeneration of industrial heritage in cities.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Jie Chen, Bruce Judd and Scott Hawken

With the dramatic transformation of China’s industrial landscape, since the late 1990s, adaptive reuse of industrial heritage for cultural purposes has become a widely…

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Abstract

Purpose

With the dramatic transformation of China’s industrial landscape, since the late 1990s, adaptive reuse of industrial heritage for cultural purposes has become a widely occurring phenomenon in major Chinese cities. The existing literature mainly focusses on specific cases, yet sees heritage conservation similarly at both national and regional scale and rarely identifies the main factors behind the production of China’s industrial-heritage reuse. The purpose of this paper is to examine the differences in heritage reuse outcomes among three Chinese mega-cities and explore the driving factors influencing the differences.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper compares selected industrial-heritage cultural precincts in Beijing, Shanghai and Chongqing, and explores the local intervening factors influencing differences in their reuse patterns, including the history of industrial development, the availability of the nineteenth and/or twentieth century industrial buildings, the existence of cultural capital and the prevalence of supportive regional government policy.

Findings

The industrial-heritage reuse in the three cities is highly regional. In Beijing, the adaptation of industrial heritage has resulted from the activities of large-scale artist communities and the local government’s promotion of the city’s cultural influence; while in Shanghai, successful and more commercially oriented “sea culture” artists, private developers in creative industries and the “creative industry cluster” policy make important contributions. Chongqing in contrast, is still at the early stage of heritage conservation, as demonstrated by its adaptive reuse outcomes. Considering its less-developed local cultural economy, Chongqing needs to adopt a broader range of development strategies.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to knowledge by revealing that the production of industrial-heritage cultural precincts in Chinese mega-cities is influenced by regional level factors, including the types of industrial heritage, the spontaneous participation of artist communities and the encouragement of cultural policy.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 34 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 July 2021

Edward Boyle

This article examines the borders of memory inherent to a Japanese World Heritage site, and their significance for the 2020 opening of the Industrial Heritage Information…

Abstract

Purpose

This article examines the borders of memory inherent to a Japanese World Heritage site, and their significance for the 2020 opening of the Industrial Heritage Information Center in Tokyo. The Center was constructed to disseminate information regarding the widely dispersed “Sites of Japan's Meiji Industrial Revolution”, which was recognized as a “serial site” by UNESCO in 2015. As with the original nomination, the opening of this Centre resulted in stringent protests from South Korea, who sought to have UNESCO consider revoking its original listing of these 23 Industrial Sites as collectively constituting the heritage of the world. This Center materializes a “border of memory” between Japan and South Korea that is the outcome of the displacement and re-siting of the heritage associated with Japan's Meiji Industrial Sites.

Design/methodology/approach

Research material is derived from nomination documents, site visits, and newspaper reports in order to contextualize and analyse the disputes associated with this particular World Heritage nomination.

Findings

The paper points to how the borders of memory present at heritage sites may shift through contestation. Efforts to fix the meaning of heritage find themselves subverted by connections across such borders of memory.

Originality/value

The paper traces the process by which the geographically-dispersed “Sites of Japan's Meiji Industrial Revolution” have been collectivized through UNESCO's recognition into a single “border of memory” between Japan and Korea, one which the Information Center subsequently succeeded in materializing and reproducing within Japan's national capital.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 October 2019

Heike Oevermann

The purpose of this paper is to identify criteria and examples of good practice in heritage management within the specific field of UNESCO industrial heritage sites. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify criteria and examples of good practice in heritage management within the specific field of UNESCO industrial heritage sites. The paper is part of a transfer-of-knowledge project between Humboldt Universität and the Zollverein Foundation (Stiftung Zollverein), responsible for the heritage management of the UNESCO Zollverein site.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed document analysis, interviews, expert discussions and application to the field.

Findings

First, a systematization, termed the Good Practice Wheel, shows eight criteria that must be considered for good practice in heritage management. Second, indicators of good practice, discussed in the academic field, can be embedded in the suggested systematization and provide further details of how to evaluate good practice. Third, the Zollverein case shows that the systematization can be applied to practice.

Research limitations/implications

The study offers a systematization to identify and discuss good practice.

Practical implications

The practical implication is to understand better how to turn the demands of UNESCO into opportunities.

Social implications

The Good Practice Wheel includes social aspects, within community engagement and the criterion of sustainability.

Originality/value

To date, this represents the only such systematic approach to identify and implement good practice in heritage management, specifically relevant for UNESCO industrial heritage sites.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 October 2013

Are Thorkildsen and Marianne Ekman

The purpose of this paper is to examine a pilot in a national R&D programme in Norway (2007-2010) to join the ongoing discussion on the different meanings and uses of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine a pilot in a national R&D programme in Norway (2007-2010) to join the ongoing discussion on the different meanings and uses of planning tools and approaches in cultural heritage across various disciplines. The study aimed to reveal how patterns of collaborative planning processes unfold in a complex cultural heritage setting, the key challenges, dilemmas and tensions in the different phases of the process and implications for future research and policy.

Design/methodology/approach

Longitudinal explorative dialogic action research was undertaken to investigate and capture the evolution of knowledge-creating processes. The qualitative data collection methods included 25 semi-structured interviews, focus group interviews, participatory observation and text and document analysis.

Findings

Experiential R&D activities can bridge and transcend the context-specific tensions that separate the involved actors and their activities. Furthermore, a pro-active cultural heritage authority is required at the national level to maintain supportive links to the local level, and it is necessary to manage and prevent potential opportunistic action from negatively affecting cultural heritage sites and processes.

Research limitations/implications

The single case study approach makes generalising beyond the current study difficult. However, the findings raise relevant issues for further research on the management of cultural heritage policy from a sustainable development perspective.

Originality/value

This paper identifies the need to study the evolving processes of linking cultural heritage, sustainable development and collaborative planning, as well as the dynamic relationship between the national, regional and local levels of heritage management.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 October 2013

Katarzyna Kosmala and Roman Sebastyanski

The main objective of this paper is to analyse the roles of the artists’ collective in the creation of socially shared knowledge, concerning Gdansk Shipyard's heritage

Abstract

Purpose

The main objective of this paper is to analyse the roles of the artists’ collective in the creation of socially shared knowledge, concerning Gdansk Shipyard's heritage protection during the urban regeneration process over last ten years, since 2002.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical section of the paper is based on a single case study concerning the artists collective’ ability to build a complex network of social relations, to research cultural heritage of the Gdansk Shipyard, to translate this knowledge into symbolic languages through art-based work and to transmit knowledge to the wider public with an aim to engage in an open dialogic public communication.

Findings

The case study draws on insights from participant observation carried out on the premises of the Gdansk Shipyard between years 2000 and 2008 and interviews with individual artists from the collective, conducted between years 2004 and 2006. Data was also drawn from archival research. The exposure in public media was also examined over last ten years, including Internet websites as well as newspapers and magazines’ content.

Research limitations/implications

The case study research indicates that methods and techniques applied by the artists’ collective in researching the shipyard's historical heritage and communicating their findings to the wider public have been more effective than the official planning methods of expert-led post-industrial urban regeneration. Over the last ten years, the artists have succeeded to transform the negative perceptions about the values of the shipyard's cultural heritage and engaged local citizens in the preservation of the historical identities of the place. In 2012, the Mayor of Gdansk has invited representatives of the artists’ collective to the newly established Young City Stakeholders’ Board in order to utilize their knowledge of the shipyard's cultural heritage and their capacity to mediate between various groups involved in urban regeneration planning process as well as to communicate with the wider public.

Practical implications

Despite persistent views in literature that equate public engagement in the planning process of urban regeneration with a kind of “modern utopia”, we argue that participatory process is not only possible in practice but also can be highly effective and democratically ethical.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Michael Paul Louw

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the feasibility of the adaptive reuse of a particular case study, and the evaluation of it within the context of international…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the feasibility of the adaptive reuse of a particular case study, and the evaluation of it within the context of international research done on similar projects. It aims to highlight the reuse potential of industrial structures by private developers, and the financial, environmental and social advantages that they could hold.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review that explores these themes is followed by the post-occupancy analysis of the case study. Data were gathered primarily through interviews with key role players in the project, site visits and an analysis of the relevant project documentation.

Findings

While there are a number of international examples of the reuse of power stations in particular, these are mostly on a large scale, dependent mostly on government funding, lottery funding and donations and generally stripped of most of their machinery. The case study is a smaller-scale example which demonstrates that a project of this nature can be entirely funded by a private developer, that it can be sustainable and that it can be done while keeping most of the original machinery in place. The case study confirms a number of findings that are revealed in current research in the field, and it also shows the relative advantages of adaptive reuse when compared to new-build projects.

Research limitations/implications

There is fairly limited information and published research about adaptive reuse, especially in South Africa, so the paper builds on international knowledge on the subject while exposing a suitable local example. It is hoped that the study will not only lead to further research and post-occupancy analysis of similar projects in South Africa in particular, but also support international research that indicates the feasibility of adaptive reuse.

Originality/value

The Thesen Islands power station (or the Turbine Hotel as it is now known) could potentially be used as a precedent for similar redevelopments, and it could shed some light on the opportunities and constraints related to the management of fixed engineering assets.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Gülferah Çorapçıoğlu

The purpose of this paper is to ensure the preservation and sustainability of traditional water mills in Turkey with their original function and to allow these water mills…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to ensure the preservation and sustainability of traditional water mills in Turkey with their original function and to allow these water mills to become heritage for future generations.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is the original examination of one sample water mill to be conserved, that is chosen from 11 water mills that were determined after the investigation of water mills in of Antalya, in Mediterranean Region. A preliminary study was first performed using the external observation method on 11 horizontal wheel water mills. The water mills to be accorded the highest priority with regards to conservation were selected based on their characteristics. Restoration techniques were then proposed to ensure the sustainability of the traditional production systems while retaining their original function.

Findings

The decision of water mill with the highest priority of conservation is based on the analysis of “structural damage,” “all seasons accessibility” and “supporting environmental factors.” This water mill was used primarily for grain production and is located on the Doyran River in Antalya. Current circumstance of the sample mill is analyzed, restoration techniques for the purpose of conservation and creation of recreational sites and that enable the presentation of traditional production methods are suggested.

Social implications

This paper includes implications for the contribution to the region’s cultural identity by developing the region’s infrastructure for cultural and ecological tourism and by ensuring the continuation of traditional production methods and craftsmanship.

Originality/value

This paper brings a new approach to the identification of water mills and the decision of the water mills to be conserved as a result of field studies.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2021

Wenzhuo Zhang

This paper critically analyses the urban memory and heritage interpretation of postcolonial Harbin, a city in China that was founded by the Russians in 1898. It…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper critically analyses the urban memory and heritage interpretation of postcolonial Harbin, a city in China that was founded by the Russians in 1898. It investigates the role and making of Russian colonial heritage in contemporary Harbin with a detailed case study of the Harbin Railway Station

Design/methodology/approach

Research methods include archival analysis, observation and semi-structured interview. In-depth interviews were conducted with local people, architect/urban planners and officials.

Findings

Local people of different generations with different backgrounds have different interpretations of the recently made colonial heritage of the Harbin Railway Station. The urban memory of Harbin has been consistently re-forming with both nostalgia and amnesia. Younger generations tend to regard the colonial heritage as their own heritage and a symbol of Harbin's cultural character without considering much about its related colonial history. In today's Harbin, colonial heritage as the “colonial past presencing” is more about a feel of the Europeanised space rather than the actual historical events of the period, and colonial heritage making becomes a tool for urban development and revitalisation at the institutional level. However, due to the paradigm shift in China's urban development, Harbin is facing new challenges in dealing with its colonial heritage.

Originality/value

Harbin is an under-researched case in terms of urban heritage studies. This paper offers a new entry point for understanding the westernisation and colonial heritage making in the contemporary China more deeply and thoroughly and helps to see the trend of China's urban development more clearly.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 8000