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Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2016

Denise A. Copelton

Celiac disease is an auto-immune disorder that requires strict lifelong adherence to a gluten-free diet. I explore how a celiac diagnosis affects gendered feeding work…

Abstract

Purpose

Celiac disease is an auto-immune disorder that requires strict lifelong adherence to a gluten-free diet. I explore how a celiac diagnosis affects gendered feeding work within families.

Methodology/approach

This chapter is based on a grounded theory analysis of field research with five celiac support groups and 80 in-depth interviews. I interviewed 15 adult men and 56 adult women with celiac, plus nine additional family members.

Findings

Gendered care work norms place the onus of responsibility for gluten-free feeding work on women, multiplying time spent planning, shopping, and preparing meals. Women employ distinct gendered strategies to accommodate the gluten-free diet. Following a strategy of integration, women tailor family meals to meet other diagnosed family members’ dietary needs and the entire family’s taste preferences. However, when women themselves have celiac, they follow a pattern of deferential subordination, not allowing their own dietary needs to alter family meals. Thus, women continue to prepare family meals as a form of care for others, even when their medical needs justify putting themselves first.

Originality/value

Social support is a key determinant of compliance with necessary lifestyle and dietary changes in chronic illness. However, little research explores the gendered dynamics within families accounting for the link between social support and dietary compliance. I show how gendered care work norms benefit husbands and children with celiac, while simultaneously disadvantaging women with celiac.

Details

Gender and Food: From Production to Consumption and After
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-054-1

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2014

Amanda Bagolin do Nascimento, Giovanna Medeiros Rataichesck Fiates, Adilson dos Anjos and Evanilda Teixeira

A gluten-free diet is the only possible treatment for coeliac disease, but studies about the nutritional content of gluten-free products and coeliac individual's diet…

Abstract

Purpose

A gluten-free diet is the only possible treatment for coeliac disease, but studies about the nutritional content of gluten-free products and coeliac individual's diet quality are scarce. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the availability, price, and nutritional composition of gluten-free products in retail stores of a Brazilian capital city.

Design/methodology/approach

All retail stores listed by the Brazilian Coeliac Association as gluten-free product selling places in the city of Florianópolis were visited. All available products were catalogued and their labels analysed for nutritional content. Similar gluten-containing products were systematically selected in order to allow comparisons. t-test, analyses of covariance, and cluster analysis were performed, all considering a 5 per cent significance level.

Findings

Availability and variety of gluten-free products was limited and prices were high. Cluster analysis found similarities in the nutritional content of gluten-free and conventional food products, suggesting that although raw materials different than wheat were being employed, the composition patterns are the same. Certain advantages in the composition of gluten-free products were observed, regarding mainly calories and sodium, however, protein and dietary fibre values were inferior.

Social implications

Results observed may negatively impact diet adherence and stimulate the intake of conventional products with harmful consequences to the quality of life and health of coeliac individuals.

Originality/value

This paper conducted a careful evaluation of nutrition composition of gluten-free products from different categories, available in retail stores, which is rare in researches on this topic. Moreover, results call attention to the need of better care in product formulation and dietary guidance for coeliac individuals.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Halina Mayer Chaves Araújo and Wilma Maria Coelho Araújo

Treatment of coeliac disease (CD) is essentially dietary and requires permanent changes in dietary habits. Glutenfree diet compliance affects every aspect of an…

Abstract

Purpose

Treatment of coeliac disease (CD) is essentially dietary and requires permanent changes in dietary habits. Glutenfree diet compliance affects every aspect of an individual's quality of life. This paper aims to analyse the difficulties associated with the food practices tried and reported by CD patients and their health and quality of life.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire with open, closed and multiple choice questions adapted from an already validated instrument was administered to a sample of 105 CD patients. The inclusion criteria were patients diagnosed with CD living in Distrito Federal (DF) who agreed to participate in the study.

Findings

The greatest concerns of CD patients were eating out (44.23 per cent), having to read food labels (50.00 per cent), believing that foods are not safe (52.88 per cent) and not having dietary alternatives (56.44 per cent). Some (39.42 per cent) patients have no difficulty following the diet, 42.3 per cent have some difficulty and 18.27 per cent find it very difficult to follow the diet.

Originality/value

This study discloses some of the social difficulties faced by CD patients, such as eating with relatives and friends, and discusses the impact of these challenges on their quality of life. The data show that information can help CD patients to maintain their quality of life.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Nicky Mendoza and Norma McGough

This paper gives an overview of the prevalence, symptoms, diagnosis and management of coeliac disease and associated disorders. It also gives some background to gluten

Abstract

Purpose of the paper

This paper gives an overview of the prevalence, symptoms, diagnosis and management of coeliac disease and associated disorders. It also gives some background to gluten testing in foods and developments in identification of glutenfree foods at consumer level.

Design/methodology/approach

The most up‐to‐date literature on various aspects of the disease have been considered and included in the report.

Findings

Coeliac disease is now known to affect one in 100 of the population, including both adults and children. As more is understood about the pathophysiology of the disease and antibody screening techniques improve rates of diagnosis are increasing. The biopsy is still required for a firm diagnosis. The range of symptoms that is now recognised is far wider than previously thought, but symptoms are still often missed, or mis‐diagnosed as IBS. The treatment for coeliac disease is the glutenfree diet, which controls the symptoms and reduces the risk of complications such as osteoporosis and gut cancer. Prescriptions of glutenfree foods are known to improve adherence to the diet, and with the range of suitable foods in supermarkets increasing rapidly, glutenfree living is becoming easier.

Originality/value

Information on several aspects of coeliac disease are presented in this paper to give the non‐expert a general, up‐to‐date overview of the disease.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 22 December 2020

Morad Guennouni, Noureddine El Khoudri, Aicha Bourrouhouate and Abderraouf Hilali

The prevalence of celiac disease is increasing alarmingly. The only and effective treatment for this disease is a strict gluten-free diet Efforts have been made by…

Abstract

Purpose

The prevalence of celiac disease is increasing alarmingly. The only and effective treatment for this disease is a strict gluten-free diet Efforts have been made by industrialists to produce gluten-free products (GFPs); however, their low availability and high cost, compared to gluten-containing products (GCPs) still remain among the factors that cause gluten-free adherence failure. The objective of this survey is to compare the availability and cost of GFPs in supermarkets in two Moroccan cities, Marrakech and Casablanca, and on e-commerce platforms and see how they compare to GCPs.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a cross-sectional study that targets supermarkets and e-commerce websites that sell GFPs food and their GCPs equivalents. The price of each product is recorded per 100 g.

Findings

The study surveys 271 GFPs and their 579 GCPs equivalents that were subsequently divided into six categories. The “GF Cookie and Cakes” category came on top of the list of products. GFPs were more available on e-commerce websites than at supermarkets in two Moroccan cities (p = 0.003). The GFPs are 364% (115–1309%) more expensive than their GCPs counterparts. Also, the authors recorded a significant price difference between GFPs sold in supermarkets and those sold on online.

Originality/value

This study reveals that labeled GFPs are less available and more expensive than their equivalents GCPs in Morocco. This affects GF diet adherence and quality of life of celiac patients. The patients who use GFPs need financial compensation from the national government.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Leonardi Louis, Ruth Fairchild and Anita Setarehnejad

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effects of alternative ingredients in three different gluten-free breads (GFBs) available in the UK market with regard to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effects of alternative ingredients in three different gluten-free breads (GFBs) available in the UK market with regard to their quality attributes and consumer preference.

Design/methodology/approach

Three different GFB samples purchased from a UK retailer were visually assessed. Their quality attributes and consumer acceptability were analysed via an untrained taste panel (n=35) on Day 1. Texture was compared using a texture analyser on Days 1 and 8, to examine the differences between samples and the effects of ingredients towards staling.

Findings

Results from visual inspection showed that ingredients affected the appearance of samples, in terms of crumb structure, and both crumb and crust colour. Firmness and springiness were significantly different (p<0.05, p=0.007) between samples on Days 1 and 8 although no significant difference existed within each individual sample. Sensory analysis showed no significant differences between samples with respect to denseness, chewiness, crumbliness, dryness and overall preference.

Research limitations/implications

The ingredient combination in each bread differed, and thus it is not clear if the results are due to the incorporation of individual ingredient or a combination of them.

Practical implications

Results of this study will help food industry to make an easier decision on gluten-free ingredients.

Social implications

It will help people with coeliac disease and those who wish to remove gluten from their diets.

Originality/value

Overall, the study showed that the use of different ingredients affected the appearance, firmness and springiness of three GFBs available in the UK market. However, it did not affect denseness, chewiness, crumbliness, dryness or consumer preference. This indicates that a number of ingredient combinations are possible in the manufacturing of acceptable GFB.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2019

Sarah Hopkins and Jan Mei Soon

Coeliac disease (CD) is a life-long condition requiring strict adherence to a gluten-free (GF) diet. Due to wide claims of availability and lower costs of gluten-free food…

Abstract

Purpose

Coeliac disease (CD) is a life-long condition requiring strict adherence to a gluten-free (GF) diet. Due to wide claims of availability and lower costs of gluten-free food (GFF) and clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in England needing to save costs, access to prescriptions for patients with CD is being limited in England. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the availability and cost of GFF in an area where patients with CD have restricted access to prescriptions and to assess the nutritional composition of GFFs available in comparison with foods containing gluten (FCG).

Design/methodology/approach

Eight food categories that were representative of a range of commonly purchased GFFs were selected. Availability and cost of the cheapest and most expensive branded and non-branded GFFs and gluten containing equivalents were surveyed at physical stores (n=19) and online stores (n=8). The nutritional composition of some of the widely available GFFs identified (n=190) and comparable FCGs (n=218) were calculated using MyFitnessPal.

Findings

None of the budget stores or corner shops surveyed stocked any of the surveyed cereal-based GFFs. Online stores had more availability than physical stores; however, there was no significant difference in cost. GFFs cost, on average, 2.18 times more than FCG. When making nutritional comparisons with gluten-containing food, protein content was lower across 55 per cent of GFF categories. There was significantly less sugar in GF brown bread, crackers, and wholegrain pasta compared with those containing gluten (CG). Another main finding was GF ready-meals contained significantly less salt than ready-meals CG.

Originality/value

Limited resources and perceived wide availability of GF products resulted in reduced GF prescriptions to patients in England. The findings in this study revealed that there is no availability of cereal-based GFFs in budget stores, high cost and limited access to prescriptions can influence adherence to a GF diet and is most likely to affect patients from deprived groups. This study recommends that the prescription of GFF to patients with CD should be continued.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Abstract

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2019

Ronald B. Larson

Socio-demographic control variables are added to food attitude analyses to improve the understanding of consumer preferences. However, socio-demographics can provide an…

Abstract

Purpose

Socio-demographic control variables are added to food attitude analyses to improve the understanding of consumer preferences. However, socio-demographics can provide an incomplete picture of prospective buyers. Including other variables in a food analysis may offer businesses, researchers and policymakers more insights into consumer food preferences. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

An internet survey of 725 adults in the USA was used to examine interest in four food traits that may be included in marketing claims: antibiotic-free meat, Humanely-raised meat, produce that could be traced back to the farm and gluten-free food. Besides standard socio-demographics, environmental preferences, impulsive buying, religiosity, spirituality, privacy concerns and social desirability bias (SDB) measures were used to predict buyer interest.

Findings

Some standard socio-demographics (e.g. gender, age and income), green attitudes, impulsive traits and concern for information privacy were associated with preferences for three of the food attributes. These linkages can help define useful segments. The results for the fourth food trait, gluten-free, should generate additional medical research. In addition, the SDB measure was significant, suggesting that social norms may favour these traits.

Originality/value

The four food traits studied in this research appear to be growing in the market and have had limited attention in prior research. Many of the independent variables (e.g. green attitudes, impulsive traits, privacy concerns) included in the models provided more information about consumer preferences and may be helpful in other food studies. The findings on gluten-free products should receive further study.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Edward D. Hess

This case could be used in entrepreneurship, strategy, and small-business courses. It presents classic issues regarding successful start-ups such as how to choose from a…

Abstract

This case could be used in entrepreneurship, strategy, and small-business courses. It presents classic issues regarding successful start-ups such as how to choose from a multitude of growth opportunities; how to pace growth so as not to dilute quality control and financial risk tolerance; and how to choose a strategic focus.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

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