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Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2016

Denise A. Copelton

Celiac disease is an auto-immune disorder that requires strict lifelong adherence to a gluten-free diet. I explore how a celiac diagnosis affects gendered feeding work…

Abstract

Purpose

Celiac disease is an auto-immune disorder that requires strict lifelong adherence to a gluten-free diet. I explore how a celiac diagnosis affects gendered feeding work within families.

Methodology/approach

This chapter is based on a grounded theory analysis of field research with five celiac support groups and 80 in-depth interviews. I interviewed 15 adult men and 56 adult women with celiac, plus nine additional family members.

Findings

Gendered care work norms place the onus of responsibility for gluten-free feeding work on women, multiplying time spent planning, shopping, and preparing meals. Women employ distinct gendered strategies to accommodate the gluten-free diet. Following a strategy of integration, women tailor family meals to meet other diagnosed family members’ dietary needs and the entire family’s taste preferences. However, when women themselves have celiac, they follow a pattern of deferential subordination, not allowing their own dietary needs to alter family meals. Thus, women continue to prepare family meals as a form of care for others, even when their medical needs justify putting themselves first.

Originality/value

Social support is a key determinant of compliance with necessary lifestyle and dietary changes in chronic illness. However, little research explores the gendered dynamics within families accounting for the link between social support and dietary compliance. I show how gendered care work norms benefit husbands and children with celiac, while simultaneously disadvantaging women with celiac.

Details

Gender and Food: From Production to Consumption and After
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-054-1

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2021

ML Wei

Markets for free from foods have undergone extensive growth as consumers attempt to manage their health in increasingly novel ways. This research explores the making of…

Abstract

Purpose

Markets for free from foods have undergone extensive growth as consumers attempt to manage their health in increasingly novel ways. This research explores the making of consumer perceptions about the health of gluten-free foods.

Design/methodology/approach

This research employs qualitative methods including in-depth interviews with consumers of gluten-free foods and content analysis of online consumer comments.

Findings

Findings illustrate how consumers leverage personal responsibility, social commentary and political criticism in ways that forge essential connections with traditional medical authority. In particular, consumers blend diverse views together by expressing reverence, positioning complementarity and framing temporality.

Research limitations/implications

This research highlights the productive role of consumers in shaping what constitutes health-related concerns and widens the scope of explanatory factors beyond product- and individual-level differences. This research is set in the context of gluten-free foods and draws on interview data from a single set of consumers. Future research could consider other free from markets including, for example, soy-free foods and corn-free foods, both of which implicate some of the most common ingredients in food products and potential regional differences both within and outside of North America.

Practical implications

This research offers insights into the marketing of gluten-free foods and free from foods in general, specifically the participation of consumers in legitimising the need for these foods on the basis of health.

Originality/value

I weave together multiple streams of work across disciplines including food marketing, contested illnesses and institutional logics to further our understanding of the dynamic nature of contemporary markets for free from foods.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2014

Amanda Bagolin do Nascimento, Giovanna Medeiros Rataichesck Fiates, Adilson dos Anjos and Evanilda Teixeira

A gluten-free diet is the only possible treatment for coeliac disease, but studies about the nutritional content of gluten-free products and coeliac individual's diet…

Abstract

Purpose

A gluten-free diet is the only possible treatment for coeliac disease, but studies about the nutritional content of gluten-free products and coeliac individual's diet quality are scarce. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the availability, price, and nutritional composition of gluten-free products in retail stores of a Brazilian capital city.

Design/methodology/approach

All retail stores listed by the Brazilian Coeliac Association as gluten-free product selling places in the city of Florianópolis were visited. All available products were catalogued and their labels analysed for nutritional content. Similar gluten-containing products were systematically selected in order to allow comparisons. t-test, analyses of covariance, and cluster analysis were performed, all considering a 5 per cent significance level.

Findings

Availability and variety of gluten-free products was limited and prices were high. Cluster analysis found similarities in the nutritional content of gluten-free and conventional food products, suggesting that although raw materials different than wheat were being employed, the composition patterns are the same. Certain advantages in the composition of gluten-free products were observed, regarding mainly calories and sodium, however, protein and dietary fibre values were inferior.

Social implications

Results observed may negatively impact diet adherence and stimulate the intake of conventional products with harmful consequences to the quality of life and health of coeliac individuals.

Originality/value

This paper conducted a careful evaluation of nutrition composition of gluten-free products from different categories, available in retail stores, which is rare in researches on this topic. Moreover, results call attention to the need of better care in product formulation and dietary guidance for coeliac individuals.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Halina Mayer Chaves Araújo and Wilma Maria Coelho Araújo

Treatment of coeliac disease (CD) is essentially dietary and requires permanent changes in dietary habits. Gluten‐free diet compliance affects every aspect of an…

Abstract

Purpose

Treatment of coeliac disease (CD) is essentially dietary and requires permanent changes in dietary habits. Gluten‐free diet compliance affects every aspect of an individual's quality of life. This paper aims to analyse the difficulties associated with the food practices tried and reported by CD patients and their health and quality of life.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire with open, closed and multiple choice questions adapted from an already validated instrument was administered to a sample of 105 CD patients. The inclusion criteria were patients diagnosed with CD living in Distrito Federal (DF) who agreed to participate in the study.

Findings

The greatest concerns of CD patients were eating out (44.23 per cent), having to read food labels (50.00 per cent), believing that foods are not safe (52.88 per cent) and not having dietary alternatives (56.44 per cent). Some (39.42 per cent) patients have no difficulty following the diet, 42.3 per cent have some difficulty and 18.27 per cent find it very difficult to follow the diet.

Originality/value

This study discloses some of the social difficulties faced by CD patients, such as eating with relatives and friends, and discusses the impact of these challenges on their quality of life. The data show that information can help CD patients to maintain their quality of life.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Nicky Mendoza and Norma McGough

This paper gives an overview of the prevalence, symptoms, diagnosis and management of coeliac disease and associated disorders. It also gives some background to gluten…

Abstract

Purpose of the paper

This paper gives an overview of the prevalence, symptoms, diagnosis and management of coeliac disease and associated disorders. It also gives some background to gluten testing in foods and developments in identification of gluten‐free foods at consumer level.

Design/methodology/approach

The most up‐to‐date literature on various aspects of the disease have been considered and included in the report.

Findings

Coeliac disease is now known to affect one in 100 of the population, including both adults and children. As more is understood about the pathophysiology of the disease and antibody screening techniques improve rates of diagnosis are increasing. The biopsy is still required for a firm diagnosis. The range of symptoms that is now recognised is far wider than previously thought, but symptoms are still often missed, or mis‐diagnosed as IBS. The treatment for coeliac disease is the gluten‐free diet, which controls the symptoms and reduces the risk of complications such as osteoporosis and gut cancer. Prescriptions of gluten‐free foods are known to improve adherence to the diet, and with the range of suitable foods in supermarkets increasing rapidly, gluten‐free living is becoming easier.

Originality/value

Information on several aspects of coeliac disease are presented in this paper to give the non‐expert a general, up‐to‐date overview of the disease.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Bazila Naseer, Haroon Rashid Naik, Syed Zameer Hussain, Tashooq Bhat and Abdul Rouf

Low glycemic index gluten-free cookies from high amylose rice flour were prepared by modifying baking conditions and ingredient composition.

Abstract

Purpose

Low glycemic index gluten-free cookies from high amylose rice flour were prepared by modifying baking conditions and ingredient composition.

Design/methodology/approach

Baking temperature, baking time, and concentration of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were varied between 170 and 190° C, 12–25 min, and 0.2–1%, respectively, using central composite rotatable design. The developed cookies were packed in metalized polyester pouches and stored under ambient conditions for a period of 90 days.

Findings

Width and bulk density of cookies increased significantly (p < 0.05) with an increase in baking temperature, while thickness, baking loss and yield decreased with an increase in baking temperature. Puffiness increased predominantly with the increase in the concentration of CMC. Design expert predicted baking temperature of 185° C, baking time of 22 min, and 0.8% concentration of CMC as desirable conditions for the development of gluten-free cookies from rice flour. Cookies developed after following optimized conditions recorded dietary fiber of 4.66%, resistant starch (RS) content of 7.20% and predicted glycemic index (pGI) of 44.60. RS, pGI, moisture, water activity, free fatty acids and peroxide value increased significantly, whereas hardness and overall acceptability decreased during storage.

RPractical implications

Gluten-free (GF) foods are in high demand globally due to the prevalence of celiac disease. Rice lacks gluten protein, and thus, can serve as a potential raw material for the development of GF cookies. In the present study, the ingredient modification and freezing interventions during baking were found to be crucial if the development of low GI gluten-free cookies having good RS content is targeted. Optimized GF cookies prepared via technological intervention and packed in metalized polyester were shelf stable for up to 3 months under ambient conditions. Furthermore, resistant starch content was enhanced while the predicted glycemic index was decreased during storage. Adoption of baking conditions and CMC level optimized in the present study can help to develop shelf-stable GF bakery products for people suffering from comorbidities like celiac disease and diabetes.

Originality/value

Resistant starch content was enhanced while predicted glycemic index was decreased during storage of gluten-free cookies prepared from high amylose rice flour. The developed cookies can be a complementary diet to people suffering from comorbidities like celiac disease and diabetes.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Abstract

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 22 December 2020

Morad Guennouni, Noureddine El Khoudri, Aicha Bourrouhouate and Abderraouf Hilali

The prevalence of celiac disease is increasing alarmingly. The only and effective treatment for this disease is a strict gluten-free diet Efforts have been made by…

Abstract

Purpose

The prevalence of celiac disease is increasing alarmingly. The only and effective treatment for this disease is a strict gluten-free diet Efforts have been made by industrialists to produce gluten-free products (GFPs); however, their low availability and high cost, compared to gluten-containing products (GCPs) still remain among the factors that cause gluten-free adherence failure. The objective of this survey is to compare the availability and cost of GFPs in supermarkets in two Moroccan cities, Marrakech and Casablanca, and on e-commerce platforms and see how they compare to GCPs.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a cross-sectional study that targets supermarkets and e-commerce websites that sell GFPs food and their GCPs equivalents. The price of each product is recorded per 100 g.

Findings

The study surveys 271 GFPs and their 579 GCPs equivalents that were subsequently divided into six categories. The “GF Cookie and Cakes” category came on top of the list of products. GFPs were more available on e-commerce websites than at supermarkets in two Moroccan cities (p = 0.003). The GFPs are 364% (115–1309%) more expensive than their GCPs counterparts. Also, the authors recorded a significant price difference between GFPs sold in supermarkets and those sold on online.

Originality/value

This study reveals that labeled GFPs are less available and more expensive than their equivalents GCPs in Morocco. This affects GF diet adherence and quality of life of celiac patients. The patients who use GFPs need financial compensation from the national government.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 24 December 2020

Estefania Julia Dierings de Souza, Aline Machado Pereira, Mauro Fontana, Nathan Levien Vanier and Marcia Arocha Gularte

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of rice flour obtained from rice grains with different levels of amylose on technological, nutritional and sensory…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of rice flour obtained from rice grains with different levels of amylose on technological, nutritional and sensory properties of cookies made with a blend of rice and cowpea flour.

Design/methodology/approach

The cookies preparation was set at a ratio of rice flour and cowpea beans 70:30. The studied formulations were: LA: low amylose rice flour; MA: medium-amylose rice flour; HA: high amylose rice flour. The quality of the obtained cookies was analyzed for proximate composition, in vitro protein digestibility, thickness, diameter, dispersion factor, texture, color, amino acid profile and sensory properties.

Findings

Proximate composition and in vitro protein digestibility showed no differences between the three studied formulations. The medium and low amylose rice flour cookies showed the lowest hardness values. The combination of rice and beans allowed a good balance of essential amino acids. The cookies formulated with high amylose rice flour presented lighter coloration, low hardness and greater sensory preference.

Originality/value

Rice and cowpea flours are an alternative source for the preparation of gluten-free bakery products, such as cookies. The high amylose content of rice flour has less negative interference in the texture characteristics of the cookies. The combination of rice and beans flour provides a balance of essential amino acids.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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