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Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2016

Denise A. Copelton

Celiac disease is an auto-immune disorder that requires strict lifelong adherence to a gluten-free diet. I explore how a celiac diagnosis affects gendered feeding work…

Abstract

Purpose

Celiac disease is an auto-immune disorder that requires strict lifelong adherence to a gluten-free diet. I explore how a celiac diagnosis affects gendered feeding work within families.

Methodology/approach

This chapter is based on a grounded theory analysis of field research with five celiac support groups and 80 in-depth interviews. I interviewed 15 adult men and 56 adult women with celiac, plus nine additional family members.

Findings

Gendered care work norms place the onus of responsibility for gluten-free feeding work on women, multiplying time spent planning, shopping, and preparing meals. Women employ distinct gendered strategies to accommodate the gluten-free diet. Following a strategy of integration, women tailor family meals to meet other diagnosed family members’ dietary needs and the entire family’s taste preferences. However, when women themselves have celiac, they follow a pattern of deferential subordination, not allowing their own dietary needs to alter family meals. Thus, women continue to prepare family meals as a form of care for others, even when their medical needs justify putting themselves first.

Originality/value

Social support is a key determinant of compliance with necessary lifestyle and dietary changes in chronic illness. However, little research explores the gendered dynamics within families accounting for the link between social support and dietary compliance. I show how gendered care work norms benefit husbands and children with celiac, while simultaneously disadvantaging women with celiac.

Details

Gender and Food: From Production to Consumption and After
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-054-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 January 2022

Azza A. Omran and Saad A. Mahgoub

Due to the need and interest of gluten-free products for celiac disease (CD) patients, the study aims to estimate the effect of the substitution of rice flour with millet…

Abstract

Purpose

Due to the need and interest of gluten-free products for celiac disease (CD) patients, the study aims to estimate the effect of the substitution of rice flour with millet flour in the presence of sweet lupin and sweet potato powder in gluten-free blends and the impact of the produced blends on gluten-free flat bread quality.

Design/methodology/approach

Seven gluten-free blends (B1, B2, B3, B4, B5, B6 and B7) were prepared with different percentages of rice flour (50–80%) and millet flour (5–35%), 10% sweet lupin and 5% sweet potato powder. Physicochemical analysis and particle size of gluten-free blends were evaluated. The resulted gluten-free bread samples were analyzed for chemical composition, color parameters and staling as well as sensory evaluation.

Findings

Results indicated that substitution of rice flour with millet flour increased protein, fat, ash, crude fiber, calcium, zinc and iron contents of flour blends, while total carbohydrates content, water holding capacity (WHC) and oil holding capacity (OHC), bulk density, L*, a* and b* values were decreased with increasing millet flour substitution. In addition, substitution with millet flour significantly increased (p < 0.05) protein, fat, ash and crude fiber contents and affected color parameters and staling of produced bread.

Research limitations/implications

As a researchers, the authors need more statistical data about type, needs, age and numbers of CD patients in worldwide and in Egypt to create a specific products for each of them. Besides, the collaboration between researchers, breeders, nutritionist and food manufactures are very vital to add new gluten-free crops.

Practical implications

New gluten-free products will be launched in markets with affordable price.

Social implications

The children with CD, especially Egyptians suffer from a shortage of varied, inexpensive and suitable gluten-free bread to achieve their needs. So the current work may help them to be satisfied.

Originality/value

Rice flour could be substituted up to 10% with millet flour without adverse effect on the sensory attributes of gluten-free bread and this may assist CD patients to discover a diversity of gluten-free blends.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2021

Müge Uyarcan, Emine Yayla, Deniz Akgül and Damla İşseven

According to the dietary needs of celiac people and very limited variety of commercially available foodstuff, the demand for gluten-free products is increasing every day…

Abstract

Purpose

According to the dietary needs of celiac people and very limited variety of commercially available foodstuff, the demand for gluten-free products is increasing every day. Keeping this in view, the present study aims to develop healthier gluten-free chicken products by using different cereal sources and to determine the effect of substitution of wheat flour with gluten-free flours on quality of chicken products.

Design/methodology/approach

Buckwheat, chickpea and rice flours were used as gluten-free flours for the production of chicken products. The physical (yield parameters, crust colour), chemical (proximate composition, caloric value, pH) and sensorial properties of coated chicken products were measured. Duncan's multiple range test and principles component analysis were performed.

Findings

Gluten-free flours were significantly effective on yield parameters, colour, moisture, protein, lipid and caloric value of the samples (p < 0.05). The results showed that gluten-free chicken products had better pickup, lighter appearance, higher cooking yield and moisture, lower cooking loss, oil absorption, lipid and caloric values compared to commercial wheat flour coated control. Regarding the overall impression rank sums, the panellists were more preferred gluten-free products than control group. The samples coated with chickpea flour were best rated by the panellists. The results of the study suggested that the use of chickpea coating flour could be best nutritionally and sensorially suitable option for producing gluten-free chicken product.

Originality/value

This study offers potential healthy alternatives to increase the variety of gluten-free products that celiac people desperately need today.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 124 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 January 2021

ML Wei

Markets for free from foods have undergone extensive growth as consumers attempt to manage their health in increasingly novel ways. This research explores the making of…

Abstract

Purpose

Markets for free from foods have undergone extensive growth as consumers attempt to manage their health in increasingly novel ways. This research explores the making of consumer perceptions about the health of gluten-free foods.

Design/methodology/approach

This research employs qualitative methods including in-depth interviews with consumers of gluten-free foods and content analysis of online consumer comments.

Findings

Findings illustrate how consumers leverage personal responsibility, social commentary and political criticism in ways that forge essential connections with traditional medical authority. In particular, consumers blend diverse views together by expressing reverence, positioning complementarity and framing temporality.

Research limitations/implications

This research highlights the productive role of consumers in shaping what constitutes health-related concerns and widens the scope of explanatory factors beyond product- and individual-level differences. This research is set in the context of gluten-free foods and draws on interview data from a single set of consumers. Future research could consider other free from markets including, for example, soy-free foods and corn-free foods, both of which implicate some of the most common ingredients in food products and potential regional differences both within and outside of North America.

Practical implications

This research offers insights into the marketing of gluten-free foods and free from foods in general, specifically the participation of consumers in legitimising the need for these foods on the basis of health.

Originality/value

I weave together multiple streams of work across disciplines including food marketing, contested illnesses and institutional logics to further our understanding of the dynamic nature of contemporary markets for free from foods.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 November 2014

Amanda Bagolin do Nascimento, Giovanna Medeiros Rataichesck Fiates, Adilson dos Anjos and Evanilda Teixeira

A gluten-free diet is the only possible treatment for coeliac disease, but studies about the nutritional content of gluten-free products and coeliac individual's diet…

1630

Abstract

Purpose

A gluten-free diet is the only possible treatment for coeliac disease, but studies about the nutritional content of gluten-free products and coeliac individual's diet quality are scarce. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the availability, price, and nutritional composition of gluten-free products in retail stores of a Brazilian capital city.

Design/methodology/approach

All retail stores listed by the Brazilian Coeliac Association as gluten-free product selling places in the city of Florianópolis were visited. All available products were catalogued and their labels analysed for nutritional content. Similar gluten-containing products were systematically selected in order to allow comparisons. t-test, analyses of covariance, and cluster analysis were performed, all considering a 5 per cent significance level.

Findings

Availability and variety of gluten-free products was limited and prices were high. Cluster analysis found similarities in the nutritional content of gluten-free and conventional food products, suggesting that although raw materials different than wheat were being employed, the composition patterns are the same. Certain advantages in the composition of gluten-free products were observed, regarding mainly calories and sodium, however, protein and dietary fibre values were inferior.

Social implications

Results observed may negatively impact diet adherence and stimulate the intake of conventional products with harmful consequences to the quality of life and health of coeliac individuals.

Originality/value

This paper conducted a careful evaluation of nutrition composition of gluten-free products from different categories, available in retail stores, which is rare in researches on this topic. Moreover, results call attention to the need of better care in product formulation and dietary guidance for coeliac individuals.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2021

Burcu Türker and Nazlı Savlak

This study aims to develop nutritious and functional gluten-free cakes for celiac patients by substituting rice flour with unripe banana peel flour (UBPF) (0%, 5%, 10%…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop nutritious and functional gluten-free cakes for celiac patients by substituting rice flour with unripe banana peel flour (UBPF) (0%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%) and to propound some chemical, textural and sensorial properties of cakes. A secondary purpose was also to contribute to waste management of the banana products industry by reevaluating the peel.

Design/methodology/approach

One-way analysis of variance and Duncan’s multiple comparison test (p < 0.05) were used to determine differences among the mean values. Proximate analysis, color, texture profile analysis, antioxidant activity, mineral composition and sensorial analysis were carried out. Data was analyzed using SAS software. Cake production was carried out in three replications.

Findings

UBPF in this study had high protein (11.2%) and dietary fiber (18.3%) as well as high antioxidant activity. In all, 5%–20% UBPF-substituted cakes had enhanced dietary fiber (2.5%–3.7% dry matter), ash content (1.6%–1.9% DM) in comparison to control cake (1.4% and 1.4%, respectively). 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity of enriched gluten-free cakes increased by 102%–534%, whereas ferric-reducing antioxidant power increased by 29.6%–143%. Up to 10% UBPF substitution resulted in texturally and sensorially acceptable, nutritious gluten-free cakes.

Practical implications

The developed product can be used practically for several applications as a healthy alternative. The use of unripe banana peel represents a promising strategy to increase the nutritional value and number of ready-to-eat food in the gluten-free market.

Social implications

This study propounds a nutritious, functional and sensorially acceptable gluten-free cake for celiac people to use practically while socialization. Cakes which are appreciated by panelists in sensory analysis will create product variety in kitchens, markets and social areas, in particular for those people suffering from celiac and gluten intolerance.

Originality/value

This is the first study to consider UBPF as an ingredient in gluten-free cake formulation. The product may positively contribute to the life quality of celiac people by propounding a gluten-free snack food for consumption in their social life. This study is also an example of the contribution of banana by-products toward the implementation of the circular economy.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 December 2021

Laura Fuentes-Moraleda, Ana Muñoz-Mazón, Coral Santiago-Rincón and Alicia Orea-Giner

This exploratory study aims to identify the main risk reduction strategies when individuals suffer from coeliac disease (CD) or non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS…

Abstract

Purpose

This exploratory study aims to identify the main risk reduction strategies when individuals suffer from coeliac disease (CD) or non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) travel. Based on Yeung and Yee's (2013; 2019) model, the paper offers a new framework for analysing the main travel risk reduction strategies for people with specific food needs. The empirical work focuses on the perspectives of different stakeholders (CD and NCGS community, restaurant managers/service providers and nutritionists).

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach based on thematic analysis is adopted. The results of 32 semi-structured in-depth interviews reveal different stakeholders' perspectives in order to understand the various strategies.

Findings

The findings confirm the high level of consensus that the main food risk reducers are: travel information, staff training in safety assurance, legislation and risk prevention protocols. The findings also show significant limitations in the information offered by restaurants, organisations and tourist destinations and the negative repercussions on the tourist experience and the reputation on a particular destination.

Practical implications

The results will help hospitality business managers and destination management organisations develop food risk reduction strategies to solve some of the most important food-related problems when people in this market segment travel.

Originality/value

This work contributes to the literature by providing a new framework on travel risk reduction strategies for people with specific food needs. The novelty of this research is mainly found in the study of risk reduction strategies related to the travel decision-making process for those with CD and NCGS from different perspectives.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 124 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Halina Mayer Chaves Araújo and Wilma Maria Coelho Araújo

Treatment of coeliac disease (CD) is essentially dietary and requires permanent changes in dietary habits. Gluten‐free diet compliance affects every aspect of an…

1291

Abstract

Purpose

Treatment of coeliac disease (CD) is essentially dietary and requires permanent changes in dietary habits. Gluten‐free diet compliance affects every aspect of an individual's quality of life. This paper aims to analyse the difficulties associated with the food practices tried and reported by CD patients and their health and quality of life.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire with open, closed and multiple choice questions adapted from an already validated instrument was administered to a sample of 105 CD patients. The inclusion criteria were patients diagnosed with CD living in Distrito Federal (DF) who agreed to participate in the study.

Findings

The greatest concerns of CD patients were eating out (44.23 per cent), having to read food labels (50.00 per cent), believing that foods are not safe (52.88 per cent) and not having dietary alternatives (56.44 per cent). Some (39.42 per cent) patients have no difficulty following the diet, 42.3 per cent have some difficulty and 18.27 per cent find it very difficult to follow the diet.

Originality/value

This study discloses some of the social difficulties faced by CD patients, such as eating with relatives and friends, and discusses the impact of these challenges on their quality of life. The data show that information can help CD patients to maintain their quality of life.

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Nicky Mendoza and Norma McGough

This paper gives an overview of the prevalence, symptoms, diagnosis and management of coeliac disease and associated disorders. It also gives some background to gluten…

4365

Abstract

Purpose of the paper

This paper gives an overview of the prevalence, symptoms, diagnosis and management of coeliac disease and associated disorders. It also gives some background to gluten testing in foods and developments in identification of gluten‐free foods at consumer level.

Design/methodology/approach

The most up‐to‐date literature on various aspects of the disease have been considered and included in the report.

Findings

Coeliac disease is now known to affect one in 100 of the population, including both adults and children. As more is understood about the pathophysiology of the disease and antibody screening techniques improve rates of diagnosis are increasing. The biopsy is still required for a firm diagnosis. The range of symptoms that is now recognised is far wider than previously thought, but symptoms are still often missed, or mis‐diagnosed as IBS. The treatment for coeliac disease is the gluten‐free diet, which controls the symptoms and reduces the risk of complications such as osteoporosis and gut cancer. Prescriptions of gluten‐free foods are known to improve adherence to the diet, and with the range of suitable foods in supermarkets increasing rapidly, gluten‐free living is becoming easier.

Originality/value

Information on several aspects of coeliac disease are presented in this paper to give the non‐expert a general, up‐to‐date overview of the disease.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Bazila Naseer, Haroon Rashid Naik, Syed Zameer Hussain, Tashooq Bhat and Abdul Rouf

Low glycemic index gluten-free cookies from high amylose rice flour were prepared by modifying baking conditions and ingredient composition.

Abstract

Purpose

Low glycemic index gluten-free cookies from high amylose rice flour were prepared by modifying baking conditions and ingredient composition.

Design/methodology/approach

Baking temperature, baking time, and concentration of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) were varied between 170 and 190° C, 12–25 min, and 0.2–1%, respectively, using central composite rotatable design. The developed cookies were packed in metalized polyester pouches and stored under ambient conditions for a period of 90 days.

Findings

Width and bulk density of cookies increased significantly (p < 0.05) with an increase in baking temperature, while thickness, baking loss and yield decreased with an increase in baking temperature. Puffiness increased predominantly with the increase in the concentration of CMC. Design expert predicted baking temperature of 185° C, baking time of 22 min, and 0.8% concentration of CMC as desirable conditions for the development of gluten-free cookies from rice flour. Cookies developed after following optimized conditions recorded dietary fiber of 4.66%, resistant starch (RS) content of 7.20% and predicted glycemic index (pGI) of 44.60. RS, pGI, moisture, water activity, free fatty acids and peroxide value increased significantly, whereas hardness and overall acceptability decreased during storage.

RPractical implications

Gluten-free (GF) foods are in high demand globally due to the prevalence of celiac disease. Rice lacks gluten protein, and thus, can serve as a potential raw material for the development of GF cookies. In the present study, the ingredient modification and freezing interventions during baking were found to be crucial if the development of low GI gluten-free cookies having good RS content is targeted. Optimized GF cookies prepared via technological intervention and packed in metalized polyester were shelf stable for up to 3 months under ambient conditions. Furthermore, resistant starch content was enhanced while the predicted glycemic index was decreased during storage. Adoption of baking conditions and CMC level optimized in the present study can help to develop shelf-stable GF bakery products for people suffering from comorbidities like celiac disease and diabetes.

Originality/value

Resistant starch content was enhanced while predicted glycemic index was decreased during storage of gluten-free cookies prepared from high amylose rice flour. The developed cookies can be a complementary diet to people suffering from comorbidities like celiac disease and diabetes.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 352